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Jyo John Mulloor Designed Customized Bike Helmets That Look Like Realistic Shaved Heads

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Looking for eye catching bike helmets might soon be a thing of the past if digital designer Jyo John Mulloor has anything to do with it. He has been experimenting with different ways to capture people’s attention on the roads, and has designed a set of four surreal looking helmets. While they are not yet available to purchase, or even more than digital prototypes, they are still an amusing idea, and a lighthearted approach to the serious issue of road safety.

One version comes complete with a man’s ears on the side, looking like a weird detachable scalp. Another has a pair of old-fashioned aviator goggles stretched over the top as if the wearer could pull them down while zooming down the road. The combination of the striking high resolution images with some serious head protection, Mulloor’s helmets are sure to be a crowd pleaser. And would no doubt make motorists more aware of the person inside of them. (Via Design Boom)

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Benoit Paillé has been attending Rainbow Family Gatherings for seven years, allowing him incredible access to communities that traditionally do not permit photography. Paillé’s extensive chronicles span continents and offer a softly lit view of gatherings in Canada, Spain and Mexico. Each photo captures relaxed — and quite beautiful — subjects in a world we wouldn’t ordinarily see.

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Haegue Yang’s Mysterious Orb Sculptures Covered With Thousands Of Bells Chiming In Motion

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Hundreds of small metal balls covering the surface of the sculpture series created by Korean, Berlin based Artist Haegue Yang. ‘Sonic Figures’ are geometric abstract creatures that come to life when they’re shaken by a human hand.

Haegue Yang speaks her own language. She has come up with her own vocabulary through abstraction. She doesn’t need the viewers to understand the meaning and influence of her work. She is offering an experience. The Sonic sculptures were created while she was working on another project during her residency in Glasgow. While listening to music, she imagined developing a piece that will ring in unison when moved around.

The artist is used to working with random household items. From that starting point, she produces sculptural assemblage. By playing with the vibrations and the chimes of the bells, she explores what it is to be human. She defies human basic senses such as sight, sound, smell, and touch. A multi sensory and mobile environment where the viewers can appreciate through her art their body and intellect. Focusing on sensory experiences, Haegue Yang not only liberates charming sounds and subtle chills from basic elements, she also triggers the viewer’s will to interact and experiment.

Making The Invisible Visible

This might be one of the most inventive works of advertising and street art that i’ve seen all year! Brothers and Sisters creative duo have teamed up with anonymous German street art collective Mentalgassi, to create art installations for Amnesty International. Called Making the Invisible Visible, the posters highlight the case of Troy Davis, a 42-year-old man who has been on death row for 19 years in the USA, despite serious doubts about his conviction.

Sculpture Clouded In Twine From Chiharu Shiota


Japanese artist Chiharu Shiota, who is based in Berlin, creates sculptural installations. Often surrounding miscellaneous items like clothing or furniture in tangled nets of twine, she places strict limits upon perception within her work. The stringy elements of her installations almost exist as clouds obstructing the objects that make up each piece. In this way, a work is viewed simultaneously as a singular object and as a product of its environment. Here, airy materials compound into an extremely weighted whole, repositioning our impressions of worldly material. (via)

Hickory Mertsching’s Picturesque Paintings On The Beauty Of Nature And Garbage

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Portland painter Hickory Mertsching has a penchant for life, death and nature: both wild and man-made. His still lifes, done in oil, showcase a confluence of symbolism with many conflicting elements. Throughout his work, one sees a running commentary of environmental negligence, and human impact through littering and deforestation. Animals juxtaposed with crushed beer cans and chainsaws showcase not only the symbolic reference of destruction but also the aesthetics of defacing the environment through litter and clear-cutting. The animals interact, oblivious to the objects, as in real life: nature cannot defend itself nor comment on our treatment of it.

It is hard to view Mertsching’s paintings without feeling a paroxysm of guilt toward existing and participating in a time of such extreme usability; within a culture that bulldozes through natural resources, sidelines scientific research in the name of profit and economic interests, everyone meets a moment where they have to wonder just how bad their impact is on the world and what they could be doing differently.

Even so, Mertsching’s paintings focus on a larger set of paradoxes than just that. There is the implied confusion within viewing the animals, of which it is uncertain whether they are alive or dead. Many of the landscapes, some on fire and under immediate threat, are not fully realized and hover curiously within the white, negative space of the canvas. The direct confrontation between life force and waste, is beautifully arranged and painted in such a light that the garbage gains an antique presence, a glowing look, one that only highlights the ridiculousness of how we treat our environment.

Mertsching’s words on his own work:

“My paintings are about illustrating and presenting unavoidable natural realities by utilizing mundane objects as symbols. The realities constantly challenge our existence and are powerful enough to be beyond our control, always offering more to wonder and question. Such as the rise and fall of a garden in the span of summer it offers sustenance but requires toil for any reward of consumption. Within this cycle all allegorical manners of life occur, crossing paths, pursuits of enlightenment, conflicts of survival, and the passing of time.”


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Raqib Shaw was born in Calcultta, India. He now lives in London where he graduated from Central St Martins School of Arts and based his house/studio in the South London neighborhood.

His work is mostly comprised of paintings. He uses a unique technique: he paints with a porcupine quill and car paint. Every motif is outlined in embossed gold, a technique similar to ‘cloisonné’ found in early Asian pottery, which is a source of inspiration.
The artist’s fantastical world is full of intricate details, rich colors, and jewel-like surfaces, masking an intense violent and sexual content. It’s an explosion of Western architecture (arches, columns, wall decorations), vibrant flora and unexpected animals that have human bodies (peacoks, ducks, roosters, reptiles).
The result from far is intoxicating; but as the viewer, you want to come closer and admire the beauty of the details. The paintings, which at first can feel overwhelming become fascinating in terms of color, shapes and harmony. Underneath the bizarre combinations of the figures, there is the celebration of a society free of moral restraint.

Raqib Shaw has added new paintings in this recent parisian exhibition. Three of them are self portraits, showing the artist in his house/studio. Although his own image never clearly appears, he made sure his favorite personal elements were recognizable: his dogs, views from his studio’s window, champagne bottles and his new bronze sculptures.

Raqib Shaw’s second solo exhibition is currently at the Thaddaeus Ropac Gallery in Paris, Marais location, until July 25th 2015.