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Geekiest Tattoos of All Time

geektattoos

Not exactly “art” persay, but I wanted to share this article Huffington Post recently put together of the “geekiest tattoos of all time” featuring inks of hourglasses to Bill Gates. While I admit to being a lover and not a fighter of technology, some of these tats might be crossing my limit. Some of them are actually kind of clever though. What do you guys think? Ps, does anyone know of a good antonym for “Luddite”?

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Timothy HUnt Is Fickle Fate


British illustrator Fickle Fate’s (AKA Timothy Hunt) quirky and minimal style boils down ideas to the bare basic shapes,thoughts, and visuals to create fantastic graphics that will have you saying “Oh I get it!”  Now I just wonder what sort of clever wordplay and graphics can be found on his business cards?

 

 

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Nathan Vincent’s Six Foot Crocheted Doily Warns ‘Be Good For Goodness Sake’

Be Good for Goodnes Sake with viewer1

Be Good for Goodness Sake detail 1

Be Good For Goodness Sake detail 2

Be Good for Goodness Sake broadcast

Santa is not the only one you telling you to be good for goodness sakes. In today’s word, that is, in today’s virtual, and real life panopticon, you have no other choice but to be good for the sake or yourself, your life, your job, etc. Your success as a human being depends on your good (or bad?) pubic, and well documented, behavior. Everyone is watching, everyone is judging.

“Be Good for Goodness Sake”,a three-person show featuring works by Nathan Vincent, Iviva Olenick, and Kathy Halper at the Muriel Guepin Gallery in New York, explores ideas of surveillance and public performance in the age of the virtual panopticon (intagram, facebook, etc).

Taking its name from Vincent’s large-scale work installed in the gallery,  “Be Good for Goodness Sake” pushes audiences to question their stance on surveillance and privacy in the age of social media.

Nathan Vincent’s six-foot crocheted doily acts as Big Brother and it invites the spectators to to sit on a bench flanked by security cameras, while Kathy Halper and Iviva Olenick create embroideries that question the psychosocial impacts of intimate over-sharing via social media. Inspired by her own Facebook feed, Olenick uses embroidery and watercolor to render her own “selfies” and portraits of others. Halper’s work similarly questions the disappearing space between public and private online through embroidered drawings of found images from teens’ Twitter and Facebook accounts.

The exhibition, “Be Good for Goodness Sake” will be on view at the Muriel Guepin Gallery in New York until January 19th, 2014.

Daniel Eatock’s Common Object Sculptures

By stacking two otherwise banal objects and calling it art, Daniel Eatock‘s sculptures both make us laugh as well as re-view the objects around us as first and foremost formal objects and secondly as things we can use to, say, move a pile of dirt around. Try it! Look at all those little smooth squares your fingers are pushing. Look around you!

In his words ” […] I propose systems, templates, invitations and opportunities for collaboration, creating social networks where contributers shape the outcome and participate in the building of works. I embrace contradictions, and dilemmas. I like gray areas, oxymorons and the feeling of falling backwards. My favorite colour is the purple found in a soap bubble. I prefer to swap and exchange things rather than use money. I seek alignments, paradoxes, chance circumstance, loops, impossibilities and wit encountered in everyday life. I often change my mind, go full circle, and arrive at the beginning.” – Daniel Eatock

The Wayfarer’s Chapel

I will start this off by saying, I know it’s a bit cliche for a 25 year old woman to begin posting about wedding chapels on art blogs.  Regardless, I do have other things on the brain, like art!

Honestly, I feel like I never really appreciated the mighty, widely conferred “greatness” bestowed upon the behemoth architect Frank Lloyd Wright until seeing this 1948 Wayfarer’s Chapel. I know that’s like a musician “suddenly” getting the Beatles, but this is magestic and awe-inspiring! The setting itself looks like a wizard’s mighty abode; constructed entirely out of glass, towering redwoods act as the pilasters of the church itself. It’s like a living, breathing ancient relic from The Hobbit- can’t you just see the Elvin-Mortal weddings taking place here? Not to mention, it’s dedicated to Swedenborg,the mystic who wrote the canonical (later very influential on occultists, who blended the text with alchemy and divination) text “Heaven and Hell,” detailing all manner of demons and spirits that he purported to have witnessed himself. It’s quite a crystal ball, I feel the energy could channel some very supernatural thoughts indeed.

Photographs Turn Hong Kong Streets Into A 2D Video Game

Christian Åslund

Christian Åslund Christian Åslund

Swedish photographer Christian Åslund realized that the city streets of Hong Kong looked like a giant video game while hanging out on a friends rooftop. So with the help of a few fun loving friends, his camera, and walkie talkies he orchestrated this playful and disorienting photo series that reminds us of the golden days of video games where Super Mario was king and the Power Glove was all the rage. (via)

Toban Nichols’ Computer Crash

 

Toban Nichols’ photographs based on computer crashes interrupt and reinterpret traditional landscape photography.

Stefan Glerum’s Vintage Advantage

I love Stefan Glerum’s mix of contemporary typography with vintage textures and colors. His illustrations are bold, playful and have a dash of sophistication that you don’t see too often these days. Make sure to check out the last graphic. Not sure what it was originally done for but it would be a great illustration for my next set of  business cards.