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Daniel Seung Lee & Dawn Kim’s Crayola Theory

Los Angeles photographer Daniel Seung Lee teamed up with New York art director Dawn Kim for a stellar little series entitled Crayola Theory. As you might have guessed, the series interprets the objects and environments in Crayola’s crayon names to make still life photographs that are a tons of fun. Not only does the project work in the direction of bringing objects to the names of colors, it inspires the converse as you wander around the city, applying names to the objects around you — voting envelope fuchsia, stereo silver, toilet paper white, suburb beige, tanning booth orange. Thank you Daniel & Dawn for reminding us that we live in a world made of colors. 

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Pawel Nolbert’sTypeface Created With Dripping Wet Paint Strokes Will Remind You Of The Beauty Of Language

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For his breathtaking project “Atypical,” the Warsaw, Poland-based illustrator and graphic designer Pawel Nolbert creates a typeface unlike any other. Composed of globular, thick brushstrokes saturated with dense color, his letters take on a tangible and material form, becoming what he calls “half-realistic, half-illustrative figurative sculptures.” For the series, the artist, who is also an art director, photographed paint splatters, and he later enhanced them and added depth through digital manipulation.

What emerges from Nolbert’s compelling work is a refreshing and visceral take on the written word, which in our contemporary culture can seem stale and lifeless. Here, language becomes physical as the body, writhing and twisting with vivid pleasure. The two dimensions of the page become the three, with thick, textured lines overlapping and creating an unexpected depth of field. Displaying an impressive grasp on color theory, the artist uses cognitive and perceptual tricks to extend the letters and numbers into three dimensionality. Complimentary colors are layered atop one another, creating an engaging visual dynamic: orange is paired with blue, purple with yellow, and green with red.

In a cultural landscape in which we are constantly bombarded with images, language moves to the wayside, and yet Nolbert finds a way to reclaim our attentions and bring us back to the fundamentals of words, letters, and numerals. Dancing about and leaping from the page, spewing paint in unexpected directions, his “Atypical” posters remind us of the vitality and creative potential inherent in verbal expression. Take a look. (via Colossal)

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Fashion Photographs Show Human Anatomy Like You’ve Never Seen It Before

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The work of Koen Hauser floats somewhere between fine art and fashion photography.  His series Modische Atlas der Anatomie illustrates this well.  The series’ title is a kind play on words – literally it translates as “Fashionable Anatomy Atlas”, yet with a single vowel change it can be translated as “Medical Anatomy Atlas”.  In the series, his subject seem to be modeling her organs as much as her clothes.  Portions of the model’s body are cut away to reveal her inner workings.  However, rather than depict the organs true to life, Hauser referenced traditional anatomy atlas’ – artistic medical reference works.

Mario Soria’s Eccentric Hyper-Real Paintings Of Pop Culture Icons

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Spanish artist Mario Soria creates stunning collage-esque paintings of iconic American images and figures such as Andy Warhol, Woody Allen, Marlene Dietrich, Audrey Hepburn, Sophia Loren, John F. Kennedy, and Abraham Lincoln. His portraits are hyper-realistic, but the seemingly random array of objects and contexts he places these figures within lends the work some eccentricity, a sense that is heightened by his use of embellished canvases and the simulated 3D effect of some of these protrusions.

Carlos Donjuan Combines Graffiti With Academia In His Figurative Paintings


Carlos Donjuan’s paintings combine his years of painting graffiti with the knowledge that he has gained in academia. By interweaving art history references with graffiti art’s history, Carlos creates a hybrid way of thinking made from art jargon and slang from the streets. His paintings work as narratives that are greatly influenced by everyone from Michelangelo to Alice Neel to Twist to Revok. There are elements in these works that deal with personal influences such as Catholicism, Mexico, Oak Cliff, illegal immigration, politics and family. The portraits not only tell stories, but also document several cultures and movements that these individuals are a part of.  Movements and cultures such as skateboarding, fixies, turntablelism, street wear, sneaker heads, graffiti and Hip Hop.

Chad Hagen

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Chad Hagen, of Minneapolis, MN, makes pleasant pieces of art that would fit wonderfully in our (new!) offices. Maybe we should order a print or two. We love his use of black and… off-white, while also mastering the use of color in other works. We were attracted to his “Historically Fragmented” series, only to be delighted in the other series he had to offer. Also check out his Flickr, as he’s trying to make something cool every day.

 

Marc Sparfel’s Animal Sculptures Made Out Of Abandoned Furniture

When French Sculptor Marc Sparfel comes across a stack of old furniture on the street he gets excited. Not because someone has just updated their home decor but because he has now gained a pile of materials for his charming animal sculptures.  Sparfel’s process is intuitive allowing curved chair rails to be come horns on a bull, a chair back to become elephant ears, and gilded couch legs to turn into a torso. The results are a poetic take on the mysterious animals that we live amongst using discarded materials that most of us wouldn’t think twice about using again. (via)

Felipe Guga

3Brazilian artist Felipe Guga creates melt-in-your-mouth imagery in sunny Rio de Janeiro. Maybe that’s why his pieces remind me of fruity cocktails and sand in my hair. Guga has successfully designed an array of t-shirts, websites and print ads with his sun-bleached pallete and swirling collage effects.