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Your Awesome Nature Photography Could Win You $15,000!

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Lover of nature and photography? There are some good news for you! The Weather Channel and Toyota have come together once again to find the most beautiful, stimulating, and jaw-dropping photographs in their “It’s Amazing Out There” photos competition. Both amateur and professional photographers are invited to submit their most spectacular images that best depict the wonder, impact, and beauty of Mother Nature.

You may be asking yourself if pictures of tornadoes, hurricanes or lightning are only applicable for this contest. The answer is “no.” The weather channel recognizes that “weather” is so much more than the forecast or even weather elements, nature alone should do.

We want YOU to submit works that fall under the categories of nature, adventure and/or the elements. The first prize is a whopping $15,000 with a second prize of $5,000, and third prize of $2,500. Three fan favorites will take home $1,000, $750 and $500.

Just think about all of the lenses and photo paper you can buy with that kind of dough!

The deadline for the “It’s Amazing Out There” contest is August 14th at noon ET.  Read the complete rules HERE And enter your photograph HERE.

 

 

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Sandro Giodarno’s Photos Of Comedic Existential Angst

Sandro Giordano - Photography

Sandro Giordano - Photography

Sandro Giordano - Photography

Sandro Giordano - Photography

Sandro Giodarno‘s photographs are like Saturday morning crime scenes. The victim? Dignity, mostly. His carefully choreographed pictures show a snapshot of cartoonish tragedy.

According to Designboom, Giodarno says of his photos, “The instinctive reaction is bewilderment and awkwardness towards the unlucky fate of the character, but then that same awkwardness breaks into a liberating laugh. This is the effect I want to recreate through my photographs: tell tragedy through irony.”

While the photos are at times baffling, they’re also increasingly absurd and comedic. One woman’s grocery trip ended in a gruesome mishap with a tomato sauce blood splatter. Another is wearing a halo of pottery shards instead of flowers. The body count reads five in one photo of a dinner party that went down like the TItanic. Truly, Giodarno’s characters are a series of unfortunate people.

“My photographs are short stories about a falling-down world,” Giodarno says, describing each scene as a “black-out” moment where each character simply gives into an existential malaise and flops down, unable or maybe unwilling to go on. They just lie there, clutching whatever material possessions they happen to have with them, that happens to define them whether deliberately or through happenstance.

On first glance, it might seem a little sad. But the name of the collection, “In Extremis (Bodies with No Regret),” is reassuring, like maybe they’ll get up again — or maybe they are fine just where they are. (h/t Designboom)

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Ben Sears

 

Kentucky-based designer and illustrator Ben Sears knows how to showcase his work. With a portfolio jumping from commercial work, process screencaps, and sketchbook doodles, one can’t help
but admire his work ethic. His sketchbook work has unlimited appeal- work that’s both clever and perfectly rendered never goes out of style. Plus, who can frown at Yoshi and ferrets?

Big Maze Installation Reveals Its Path The Further You Wander Into It

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International architectural firm Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) has created a life-sized wooden maze reminiscent of European hedge mazes of the 17th and 18th centuries, currently on view at The National Building Museum in Washington D.C. Eighteen feet high and made of baltic birch plywood, this installation offers a glimpse into BIG’s work and their forthcoming exhibition, scheduled to open in early 2015. The thoughtful design of this labyrinth allows visitors to see the entirety of the maze elevated around them once they fully descend to the center of the structure. BIG describes the project,  “As you travel deeper into a maze, your path typically becomes more convoluted. What if we invert this scenario and create a panopticon that brings clarity and visual understanding upon reaching the heart of the labyrinth? From outside, the maze’s cube-like form hides the final reveal behind its 18 foot tall walls. On the inside the walls slowly descend towards the center which concludes with a grand reveal – a 360 degree understanding from where you came and where you shall go.” (via design boom)

Ash Thayer’s Raw Photographs Document Her Years As A Punk Rocker Who Lived In NYC Squats

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Ash Thayer photographs are the reflection of her life. Portraits, landscapes and places that represent the beginning of her life as a young woman braving the intense city of New York. ‘Kill City’ is her memoir through those years. It’s a compact diary comprised of photographs taken when she was living in the See Skwat squat after she got evicted from her first apartment in the city. The pictures are raw and incredibly emotional. It’s not a wish to uncover a way of living, it’s a desire to extract the beauty that lies inside the characters and scenes she witnessed.

At 19 years old, Ash Thayer found herself evicted. With no resources and no family, she found in a Lower East Side building a shelter, a roof to call home. She surrounded herself with a new family, punks surviving just liked her. Soon realizing that she was deeply touched by social activism and protest movements she took part in defending and documenting the subculture she was living in.

The subjects of her photographs are simple and honest. People from her daily life posing naturally under the dim lighting of the squat. There’s no intention in claiming a harsh living situation or showing off extreme conditions. In her pictures, the artist depicts vulnerable sincere souls supporting each other. “On the street [people saw us as] street hustlers, trouble makers, vandals—that just wasn’t really the case. We were hanging out, drinking and watching 90210 around one TV, like 15 of us”.

Ash Thayer’s photographs will be exhibited at Superchief Gallery in Los Angeles starting September 19th 2015. The ‘Kill City’ book is available for purchase here.

Kate Nartker’s Fictional Animations Made Out Of Fabric

Kate Nartker, "No Divorce"

No Divorce, Kate Nartker from CCA Grad on Vimeo.

Zero, Kate Nartker from CCA on Vimeo.

Blurring the line between fabric, film and fiction, artist Kate Nartker‘s work serves as a meditation on the most easily forgotten moments of every day life. Zero-ing in on select snippets of video, Nartker translates the static and fuzz of forgotten moments into physical textile pieces. The pieces themselves break down into a moving frame-by-frame recreation of the original video piece, provoking the viewer with questions of time, intention, physical artifact and digital interpretation of real life. Her work has most recently been shown at San Francisco’s Alter Space.

Nick Pedersen’s Overgrown Post-Apocalyptic Environments

 

“My goal with this project is to create striking juxtapositions between the ruins of modern civilization and a futuristic ecological utopia.”

Brooklyn-based artist/illustrator Nick Pedersen -whom we featured in the 6th installment of our limited edition book series– recently finished a new batch of work entitled Ultima. The loosely narrative series depicts a post-apocalyptic environment in which conflicts between modern and early cultures, and man and the natural world are given prominent attention. In the world that Pedersen has conjured, overgrown cities (though absent of their typical, busy inhabitants) are full of life. The lush, green environments project a vibrancy that’s really appealing. But the digital works have their quiet aspects too- deer slowly pick their way through the brush; and stoic, masked tribesmen explore their bizarre surroundings. Check out more images from Ultima after the jump.

Mr. Bingo

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Londoner illustrator Mr. Bingo is a funny man. He seems to specialize in doing drawings that come off as doodles a really cool and talented teenager might do in math class. Fortunately for him, his clients – which include the Mighty Boosh, Wired, and the New York Times – love him for it, embracing the very British wit present in each of his illustrations. Make sure to check out the entirety of the first project on his site (Tiny Acts of Rebellion) – some brilliant, subversive stuff.

Robert G. Bartholot

Robert G. Bartholot

It seems like Robert G. Bartholot has done a little bit of everything–fashion, art direction, graphic design, illustration. I especially like his “Fragile” and “Anuk” series (both in collaboration with Álvaro Villarrubia) and “Freakshow” (in collaboration with Patrick Mettraux). All three target the bizarre in some way–through the depiction of unearthly figures, through extreme camera angles to capture distortion, or simply through illustrating modern mythical creatures/ humanimals.