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Lisa Yuskavage’s Paintings Of Voluptuous Women Reclaim Femininity

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If her voluptuous women with their cartoon eyes weren’t enough, Lisa Yushavage captured my soul by saying:

“As an artist you’re supposed to spend your life doing something that’d be an utter waste of time for anyone else. And even so, there’s no proof you’re not wasting your life making some total crap.” (Source)

Using her exceptional skill in oil paints to create hyper-hued landscapes with ripe, almost blowsy, nudes is clearly not making crap. With a career that started in the mid 1990s, her work has been the subject of solo exhibitions at prominent institutions, including the Museo Tamayo Arte Contemporáneo, Mexico City; Royal Academy of Arts, London; and the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia.

“I don’t want my pictures to be up to any good. I like the idea that they’re troublemakers. So if I’m told they’re bad for the world, it pleases me. I don’t want to make something that’s an antidote. I want to pose questions. That’s what I do. I suppose I strive to bother people and be loved for it. That’s the dream.” (Source)

These are erotic pictures of women, painted by a woman. Rather than the patriarchal view of sexual woman as object, these women are sexual for themselves. Sometimes kinky, often controversial, these paintings have been compared to soft-core porn. It’s intended as an insult, but it’s actually a reclaiming of power and the ability to depict women in all their forms. “It’s not about being well behaved,” Yaskavage says. “It’s not about behaving for others.”

The essence of female power is not that women must be desexed, it’s that women can decide how they want to be seen—sexy, silly, powerful, maternal, erotic, masculine, intelligent, profound—any combination of these, and much more. Yaskavage’s women are the creatures of her mind, brought to life through her skill with a paintbrush, and behaving in exactly the way they’re meant to in the worlds she’s created.

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Mysterious Meyoko

meyokoinkdrawigI was perusing the Beautiful/Decay Creative Pic Flickr Pool this morning and came across Meyoko’s densely delicate ink drawings. Half Arcimboldo’s grotesque fruit heads, half seething with creatures from the garden of  Hieronymous Bosch‘s earthly delights, Meyoko’s works flit, tangle, weave, drip, and feather their way into strange specters. I realized I’ve seen her work before, somewhere, though I can’t recall exactly, so when it popped up on our Flickr page like a repeat-dream I was strangely enchanted- fitting I suppose! More works after the jump. I can’t seem to find any other information about her aside from her Flickr page. So, Meyoko, if you want to tell us who you are (or anyone knows the whereabouts of this mysterious ink-chanteuse) let me know!

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Made With Color Presents: Terence Hannum’s Minimalist Paintings Created Out Of Cassette Tape



CrystalThe good folks at portfolio site builder Made With Color have teamed up with Beautiful/Decay yet again to bring you exclusive artist features. Each week we team up to bring you some of the most exciting artists and designers working today who use Made With Color to create their clean and sleek websites. Website builder Made With Color doesn’t just help artists create minimal and mobile/tablet responsive websites but allows them to do so in a few minutes without having to touch a line of code.This week we are happy to share the work of talented artist and long time B/D friend Terence Hannum.

Terrence Hannum has always been consumed by music. When Terence isn’t in the studio creating his next work of art he can be found releasing zines, designing and releasing limited edition vinyl, and playing in his acclaimed minimalist black metal band Locrian. So it should come as no surprise to discover that Terrence’s artwork also explores the world of  music. Using the magnetic tape found in cassettes as raw material, Hannum creates glossy and lustrous paintings that explore the world of minimalism and geometry.

Hannum states about this body of work:

“Typically one does not engage with the material of the  cassette. Unless it was being eaten by a tape player, the average consumer never gazed upon its reflective spool. To this point most media requires a certain precious handling of it, the CD, DVD and LP require the listener to hold only the edge. Perhaps speaking to the ubiquity of the digital file these days, the MP3, FLAC, WAV and others have no real handling instructions. I want to focus on the surface. Hence, everything is the surface and in my pieces I try to construct a quiet void.”

Rui Pedro Esteves


Rui Pedro Esteves has a way with illustrating people. His loose, sketchy quality gives these 2-dimensional portraits a lively sense of personality. I find them quite charming….yet I’m a little frightened by the stares. He lives in Lisbon, Portugal surfing, illustrating and making short films for us to enjoy.

El Famoso

El Famoso is the moniker for collaborative duo (and brothers) Rich and Chris Fairhead. Their humorous and playful illustrations have a clunky and quick feel to them that’s always a nice treat. Your probably wondering what influences them. Here is a list in no particular order “warriors, monsters, gods, witchcraft, animals,hand painted signs, mr kipling, toys, party food (nibbles), Jonny Cash, Russian Criminal tattoos, tribes, comics, heroes, screen prints, killer robots,
bad films, graffiti, posters, black & white, fantasy, folk and some other bits and bobs. “

Kacper Kowalski’s Mesmerizing Photos Of The Polish Forest From Bird’s Eye View

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Photographer Kacper Kowalski captures life from above in these beautiful images of the Polish woodlands. The bird’s eye view features incredible, vibrant shots that are simultaneously recognizable and abstract. Brilliant greens, blues, pinks, and purples dot the landscape and play with our sense of scale. Trees look minuscule in many of the compositions, like they’re pipe cleaners or tiny army.

There’s a divide in many of Kowalski’s photos whether it by a river, a road, or line of trees. This separated area creates a pause or compositional breath. We’re often overwhelmed by texture or patterns. The photographer’s decision to include these areas allows time for reflection and comparison. How are the two spaces different? How are they same? What does it mean for them to coexist? (via a_a)

Larry Carlson


Dear “Psychedelic” Artists: It takes more than neon paint and a strategically placed black light to blow one’s mind. Just ask Larry Carlson, visionary multi media artist! I would describe Carlson’s work as Magritte and Dali’s love child if such a child were conceived after the advent of Photoshop. Beautiful yet jarring, welcoming yet otherworldly, Carlson’s work is a true feast for the eye.