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Roland Tiangco’s Dirt Poster

roland tiangcoRoland Tiangco’s dirt poster is genius… you just need to click more to check it out.

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Nezaket Ekici’s Liberates Herself By Cutting Off Her Hair

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Wearing a bright orange dress and armed with scissors, German artist Nezaket Ekici is tethered to the ceiling of a room via her hair. Long ropes act as handcuffs and are tied to the ends of her long brown strands. The only way out? To cut the strings or hair. Her performance, titled Atropos, was first presented in 2006 and again in 2008. It used 100 ropes, 100 hairlines, and 100 pitons (a type of metal spike) and lasted one hour.

We see that during Atropos, strings and hair are cut and dangle over Ekici’s eyes and other pieces of rope. At its core, it’s the act of freeing oneself from the ties (literally) that bind. In a statement about the work, posted on the Celeste Network:

She carries out an act of the self-liberation, while she frees herself with the help of a sissle from long ropes fastened at the roof and to the hair. She cuts off a part of her hair and in this way dissociates herself from a piece of herself. This work can be seen as a vital discussion about the question on the sense of life, that is partly characterised by striving for freedom. Particularly, because hair can be considered as a symbol of life.

This piece’s title comes from the Greek myth of the Moirai who are the goddesses of fate. The statement further explains:

Atropos, who is one of them splits according to the myth the fate threads of the life with a sissle. The artist shows with the radical act of the hair-cut a way out. She takes fate into her own hands and frees herself, like Atropos did. At least the act of the cutting can be seen as an attempt of liberation in itself. (Via Sweet Station)

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BeMySatellite is a new public initiative founded by LA-based designer, Bora Shin, that will be officially launching it’s first “mission” at 09:32–9:38AM on Monday, 02/26/2011. Starting with Los Angeles County, the initiative aspires to help every individual on planet earth (roughly 9.83 million people – no big deal, right??) collaboratively leave their mark on commercial satellite imagery (think Google, Yahoo, Bing…). Put simply: the project reinterprets a satellite to be one that facilitates creative opportunities for self-expression, public art, and performance as opposed to one that solely documents and monitors the land. More after the jump.

Artist’s Turns Body Movement Into A Drawing

Typically, the art of drawing focuses on the finished product – the marks left on the paper that form an image.  Heather Hansen‘s Emptied Gestures is as much a performance piece as it is a drawing.  Appearing to use charcoal or pastel, Hansen literally steps on to the paper and begins to draw.  She allows the natural movements of her body – the movements of joints, the extension of her back, stretching and contracting – to define her lines.  The large-scale drawing becomes a kind of record of her moving body.  Interestingly she says:

“Emptying Gestures is an experiment in kinetic drawing. In this series, I am searching for ways to download my movement directly onto paper, emptying gestures from one form to another and creating something new in the process.”

Adam Martinakis’ Digital Worlds

Polish pixel wizard Adam Martinakis’ digital illustrations are out of this world. I can’t figure out if these started as photographs, elaborate sets, or live completely within the computer but they are impressive nevertheless.(via vectro ave)

Caktus & Maria’s Fluid Watercolor Portraits

Italian illustration duo Caktus & Maria bring a powerful and fluid flair to their juicy watercolor portraits. Each piece is frozen in time like a river of color that was stopped exactly at the precise time that a face emerged out of it. (via)

Pro Infirmis Raises Body Diversity Awareness With “Disabled” Mannequins

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Pro Infirmis, a Swiss charity organization for people with disabilities, has created a series of mannequins that reflect bodies of people with physical disabilities for a project titled, “Because Who is Perfect? Get Closer.” The process of measuring the bodies of 5 people and sculpting the mannequins was captured by director Alain Gspone in this moving 4 minute film. The reactions of each person upon seeing their mannequin are also captured, with one woman remarking, “It’s special to see yourself like this, when you usually can’t look at yourself in the mirror.” For people not used to seeing reflections of their body types in the commercial world, these new mannequins create an empowering experience by providing a platform of visibility in an industry that so often neglects to represent the diversity of bodies.

After the mannequins were created, they were placed in Zurich store fronts, on a popular downtown shopping street, Bahnhofstrasse, in honor of International Day of Persons with Disabilities. The video shows a range reactions of people as they walk by the store front, captivated by these new mannequins.

Through this project, Pro Infirmis wishes to raise awareness of the lack of representation of people with disabilities, especially in the world of fashion and retail. You can find more photos and information about the project on Photopress.  (via the huffington post and the daily mail)

Astronaut Creates Zero-Gravity Light Painting

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Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata has been creating beautiful light art while aboard the International Space Station. Using long exposure photography and a spiral top equipped with LED lights designed by light artist Takuro Osaka, Wakata produces light paintings in an atmosphere of zero gravity. In 2009, Wakata flew as a crew member of the ISS where he first experimented with the Osaka’s spiral top (also pictured here). In 2011, Wakata was assigned as a Flight Engineer for ISS Expedition 38 and the Commander of Expedition 39. Wakata is the first Japanese astronaut to command the ISS. You can check out more of Wakata’s incredible space photos on his Twitter feed. (via i09)