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Sonny Smith 100 Records

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I believe we were at Adobe Books on 16th Street in San Francisco when Sonny Smith first told me about his ambitious project 100 Records. It was one of many conversations Sonny was having with other artists; simply asking them if they would make artwork for the record cover of a fictitious band. The exhibit opened a few weeks ago at Gallery 16 and instead of writing more about the project, I would invite you to read Victoria Gannon’s review on Art Practical. I would also suggest that you watch KQED‘s feature with words from Sonny Smith himself. Exhibition closes May 28th. Will travel to other cities this Summer/Fall. Enjoy more images after the jump…

*All images courtesy of Gallery 16 San Francisco

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Jean Pichot

Jean Pichot went to the beach with Ana on their bicycles. Jean wanted us to come with, but we forgot to RSVP – so he captured the whole thing for us. Let’s go ahead and join them.

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Yueh Alex Lu

The fact that my name is also Alex explains my natural affinity for this work, but that isnt the sole explanation of the genius of Yueh Alex Lu.

 

Mary Anne Kluth’s Visitor Center

Mary Anne Kluth’s Visitor Center project is a multi-layered series involving ceramic rocks, talks with her geologist father, and detailed dioramas. Here is a description of the project in the artists own words:

My recent work is a conceptual project which began with a simple exercise. I asked my geologist father to describe the formal attributes of his favorite rocks from his collection, which he has been amassing over his entire 40-year career. Then I made ceramic models based only on his descriptions, having no other specific knowledge of the originals. Once I had these ceramic “abstracted rocks”, I then asked my dad to guess which rock sample matched up with which ceramic piece, and got him to tell me basic stories about the places he found each original. I then made dioramas to re-create the scenes he described, and took photographs to document these simulations.

The final presentation is a faux-museum, displaying the c-prints and ceramics alongside the language we used to create them, as well as watercolors made from the original rock samples my dad was thinking of, and infographic paintings elaborating on the ideas and conversations sparked by the process.

INSA Creates The World’s Largest Animated GIF Captured By Satellites

graffiti One part of the world's largest GIF

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UK-based street artist INSA is known for combining animated GIFs with graffiti in a brilliant fusion called “GIF-ITI.” The on-going project entails him painting a mural several times over in slightly different interactions. Then, INSA combines each version to form an “animated” painting. The result is a dizzying, spectacular GIF.

The artists’ most recent endeavor is part of “GIF-ITI,” but on a much, much larger scale. Where before he would paint the walls of buildings, INSA got much more ambitious. WIth the help of a team of painters and a satellite in space, he created the world’s largest animated GIF in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

The entire laborious process is captured in a short video (featured here). It shows the four-days of painting and repainting, moving the lines ever so slightly to create the illusion of movement later. (Via Booooooom, Photoshop.com blog, and 123 Inspiration)

Richard Pearse’s Wood Grids

I’m loving these wood collage paintings by Richard Pearse.  Some great textures and color combinations throughout his entire body of work.

Mark Wagner’s Rich Collaged World

mark wagner money collage

Mark Wagner’s money collages are surreal, bizarre, and extremely intriguing. I’ve seen hundreds of artists use currency in their art over the years but Mark’s work pushes the technique to new limits. More images after the jump.