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Will Kurtz’s Paper Mache Gallery Dogs

Will Kurtz lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. Kurtz is well known for his life size sculptures made out of newspaper. He recently opened a solo exhibition at Mike Weiss Gallery NY entitled Another Shit Show. From the press release: “Using the empty gallery as a site on which to stage operatic, all-encompassing mise-en-scene, Kurtz makes an ambitious, multi-part figure installation that throws the facade off human nature – albeit in canine terms. Constructed of unlikely materials such as newspaper, glue, wire and wood, more than 20 dogs of every breed, size and color, strain and cavort off the leash of a single human handler, each rendered more expressively than the next. Kurtz, a master of anatomy, achieves an utterly believable aesthetic by building up layer upon layer of yesterday’s news, held together by exposed grommets and endless amounts of masking tape.” The exhibition is on view through April 27th, 2013.

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Hilarious Drawings By Kids Of Their Grandparents Brought To Life

Yoni Lefevre Yoni Lefevre GREY POWER Yoni Lefevre GREY-POWER Yoni Lefevre

Dutch designer Yoni Lefevre’s series Grey Power has the simple aim of honoring our old and wise grandparents in a quirky, fun, and imaginative way. Using children drawings of their grandparents Lefevre transforms the hilariously bizarre drawings into charming and playful photographs that depicts grandparents as active and fun heros.

About the project Lefevre states:

“We are living in a rapidly ageing society. A majority regards this as a negative development. Older people are perceived as standing on the sideline, having lost their independence. But I see the great value this generation can offer. For ‘Grey Power’ I used drawings made by children of their grandparents, to create an image boost for this generation. Children do not regard their grandparents as grey and withered, but as active human beings who add color to their lives. Their fresh perspective can contribute towards a more nuanced and positive view on the composition of our society.”

 

We at Beautiful/Decay abosolutely love this project as it is proof that sometimes a simple concept can pack a powerful (and hilarious) punch. (via designboom)

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Stephen Mackey’s Fantastical Soft-Focus Fairy Tale Paintings

Stephen Mackey - Painting

Stephen Mackey - Painting

Stephen Mackey - Painting  Stephen Mackey - Painting

It’s a popular thing to draw on fairy tales and the fairy tale tradition as inspiration for art, but painter Stephen Mackey has invented a whole fantasy world of his own. Working with oil on wood, his paintings are by turns in media res cautionary stories and mysterious rituals straight out of make-believe myths. Each painting is labeled in cursive script or all caps serif, and the titles don’t do much except further the enigma. “Somnambulist as a Bride Ascending a Staircase Backward,” proclaims one. Another is straight out of the recipe book of some apocryphal apothecary: “Charm No. 2: Attar of Knotgrass.”

Populated with velvety plush clouds and soft-focus girls, Mackey’s world is certainly charming. There are friendly faces in his darling cat-headed children and the moon, which is adorned with a Mona Lisa smile. However, there is sense of danger in the still water: a menacing shadow looms in “The Secret People,” and another painting shows a little girl being lured to a cottage by a wolf-headed mother. The latter is simply called, “What the Moon Saw.”

Mackey’s paintings seem to all occur in the twilight hours or at least before waking. They hint at elusive stories that promise to be as interesting as they appear. Richly colored and filled with wonder, they feel like an elaborate game of hide and seek with one’s own dreams.

Billy Hayes aka Chicken Billy

ChickenBilly

Here is Chicken Billy’s recipe to his bright vector illustraions: take Hanna Barbera, Hulk Hogan, History Channel, James Brown, Fort Worth Zoo, B.B. King, Hank Williams III, Jesus Christ, a pair of cowboy boots and a pair of jeans, some Mexican beer, your choice, and put them on a surface only using flat vector shapes. Well then… there you have it. Taste like Chicken!

Video Watch: Sky Ferreira’s Lost In My Bedroom

Sky Ferreira is back with a new video for Lost in my Bedroom directed by Grant Singer. This is the third video from her Ghost EP along with Everything is Embarrassing and Sad Dream. The video comes with a warning that it may induce an epileptic seizure so be careful out there.

New York Magazine just named Everything is Embarrassing their song of the year for 2012. You can see her perform tonight on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon backed by the Roots and you can look forward to the release of her debut LP later this year and hopefully an extended tour.

Jeremy Laffon’s Chewing Gum Installations

Jeremy Laffon installation1 Jeremy Laffon installation2

Jeremy Laffon installation3

Jeremy Laffon‘s series of installations are entirely constructed from chewing gum.  He painstakingly builds each of his installations with this unusual material.  The precision and care he gives to his work is contrasted by the material itself.  Chewing gum isn’t particularly strong or sturdy – the lattice work structure buckling under its own weight, or tiled gum easily giving way underfoot.  Chewing gum is also associated with casualness, rude to chew in formal settings, spit out when finished with: a pleasant surprise in an often stuffy art world.

Zero Cents’ paintings of Bloodbaths

Tel Aviv artist Zero Cents updated his blog recently. Cents is great because his style fits his subject matter so well. I feel dirty just looking at these, and I mean that in the best way possible. See more of the artist’s gory new stuff after the jump. 

Shawn Huckins Replicates Paint Swatches While Integrating Imagery Into Every Hue

Shawn Huckings - Paint on PanelShawn Huckings - Paint on PanelShawn Huckings - Paint on Panel

The detailed paintings of Shawn Huckins portray common, day-to-day imagery while flawlessly integrating it into what seems to be miniature paint swatches. Although you may think that the artist paints directly on tiny paint cards used as color samples at hardware stores, but they aren’t actually small at all. In fact, these are not real paint cards, they are fairly large paintings that, thanks to Huckins’ finely crafted skill, are made to replicate exactly the different hues and segments of a paint card. If this was not impressive enough, the realistic imagery included in this series titled The Paint Chip Series, seem to fit perfectly into their settings. He creates a breathtaking mountain range on top of ”Cool Jazz” blue, and a “Pacific Sea Teal” has a pool splash erupting from its color patch. However, not all of Huckins’ imagery perfectly matches their chosen color. Many of the swatches have an unexpected twist, as his “Spring Moss” yellow has a car melting and sinking into the rich tone.

Huckins’ work is inspired by the beauty in the everyday, along with influential artists like Ed Ruscha and Andy Warhol. His work explores common imagery, like people sitting in chairs and an employee pushing a shopping cart, and their role in our lives. Even the paint cards are familiar objects that one might find in any home improvement store. Huckins explains these universal commonalities as a way to connect to our everyday surroundings and explore their meanings.

Mimicking the exact proportions, font, layout, and hues of miniature paint cards found at a nation-wide home improvement store, bands of color we may choose for our most intimate spaces—bedrooms, kitchens, family rooms—are an ideal stage to examine the everyday people and objects that occupy our world.