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Susannah Martin’s Contemporary Interpretation Of The Classical Nude

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Susannah Martin is a German-based artist whose subject matter is timeless. Her realistically-rendered pastel drawings and oil paintings feature nude subjects who are exploring an idyllic landscape. As they wade through streams and pass by mountains, men, women, and children encounter different wild life. The poses and scenarios aren’t sexually motivated, and instead we see Martin’s figures presented in a much more classical, art historical way. She explains:

The history of the painted nude in landscape documents exactly this eternal longing. Setting aside for a moment, any erotic motivations, the nude has always also been a symbol for man in his purist form, his original form, his primordial form. Stripped of all social indicators; clothing, possessions , etc., he exists independent of identity in a time of pure being ( ein Zeit des Seins). Being is our eternal home. Nature does not possess an identity, it is. The nude in a natural setting has always been associated with our return to a time of pure being, a return home.


As time has passed and technology rapidly advances, we become more disconnected with the natural world; so much so that we’re more of visitors than inhabitants. Martin goes on to write:

Nature is no longer home to us, she is much more a tourist destination. Certainly no representation of the nude in landscape in the 21st century can escape conveying our extreme estrangement from nature, intentional or not. There is an unavoidable strangeness or feeling of dislocation which envelopes the most sincere attempt at harmony. How absurd man seems stripped of his possessions and identity crutches and yet it is indisputable, he gains strength, clarity and beauty when we contemplate him abstractly , as a phenomenon of nature. My experimentation with contemporising the nude in landscape takes place within this framework of tension between these two poles of self-perception.

And finally:

… if we accept that realism now includes virtual realism, that is it incorporates a high degree of improbability, a hyperbolic realism. Man may return once again to his original landscape, his eternal home, all be it this time as a tourist, a primordial tourist.

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Hyperrealist Sculptures Of Celebrities And Artists Unsettles Our Senses

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Kazuhiro Tsuji creates hyperrealist large portraits of celebrities, artists and presidents. His career in Hollywood as a special effect make-up artist has taught him how to transpose fictional features on human faces. He is now entering the art world and leaving his imagination to guide his creations.

The sculptures are 8 times larger than a human head. Made out of resin and platinum silicone, they offer close to real details; such as pores, lashes, hair and wrinkles. Andy Warhol, Frida Kahlo, Salvador Dali, Dick Smith and Abraham Lincoln appear as if they were going to start moving. When looking at the faces, we cannot consider that the celebrity represented could have existed differently.

The sculptures have an underlying process and are not just depicting a person. Kazuhiro Tsuji manipulates the feeling of empathy. He uses the neutral expression of his characters to entice the viewer and connect with his curiosity; wanting to create a dialogue between the public and the sculpture. According to him, different sets of mood can hide behind a poised look. The sculptures have the ability to invite us to go behind the mask. A step the artist is urging us to take. (Via Illusion Scene 360)

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Kimm Whiskie

All the way from Lithuania, Kimm Whiskie shoots the type of photographs that make my heart twinge with nostalgia for all those ephemeral moments that just slipped by…


Jeff Hamada for Converse


full_converse_021Jeff Hamada (designer extraordinaire and creator of fave blog, Booooooom) recently teamed up with converse to make the above hand-winged design. They sort of look like if you put them on you’d suddenly be able to fly.The nice thing is, all profits from shoes purchased wholesale at the upcoming Live Stock event on February 19th in Vancouver will be donated to the Global Fund. (Flyer after the jump). Look rad, give back. Win-win.


Alberto Guedea Zamora

Alberto Guedea Zamora

Alberto Guedea Zamora is a multi-disciplinary artist from Toronto, Canada. Abstract in every sense of the definition, his presence lacks a concrete existence in his own work- often posing with his face covered by a tangle of hair or his body colored by some bright paper. He become a ghost, keeps distance and remains impersonal. You can see a longer in depth interview with him and the full text I’ve paraphrased at Things of Desire (“Canada’s Alternative Art Weekly”).

Ah, nostalgic Pyromania…

If you smoke like I smoke…then you miss the good ol’ days of decorative matchbooks. James Lileks has put together an impressive gallery of retro matchbook covers.

Warren Thomas King


Warren Thomas King describes his work as “Brococo,” a combination of his interest in Rococo styling and the modern day bromance. If for some reason that doesn’t make perfect sense to you, from what I can gather, Brococo translates into paintings of dudes with crazy facial hair. You know, like jack hammer beards and mustaches shaped like space shuttles. These guys may not be mild-mannered Watercolor’s usual house guests but that’s what makes them awesome.

Chris Labrooy’s playful 3D illustrations

I’m absolutely loving the 3D illustrations of Chris Labrooy with their dynamic sense of color, composition, and playful humor. If that’s not enough Labrooy also has a brilliant eye for typography, creating custom typefaces out of everything from people to architecture. (via)