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Jeff Luker

Jeff Luker


Jeff Luker, a graduate of the very cool Emerson College in Boston, has quite a knack for capturing moments on film. Every image feels very familiar and hazy, as if it were seeping back through your memories.


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Mataerial: The Incredible 3D Drawing Machine

Mataerial design4 Mataerial design2

Mataerial Introduction from Mataerial on Vimeo.

One of the most talked about trends in the creative community is 3D printing and its potential.  A collaboration between the Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia and Joris Laarman Studio created a machine that is perhaps more appropriately considered a 3D drawing tool called Mataerial.  The machine extrudes a thermosetting polymer: a material that, due to a chemical reaction, comes out of the nozzle virtually dry and set.  This means that Mataerial is able to construct designs without the need of a level base.  The tools creations can even be extruded of a vertical surface, directly off the wall.  [via]

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Andy Freeberg’s Photos of Gallery Dealers At Art Fairs

Andy Freeberg‘s “Art Fare” series is currently on view at Kopeikin Gallery in Culver City, CA. The series captures gallery owners and artists, usually hidden behind desks and gallery walls, in plain sight at major art fairs. Simultaneously “real-life” and narrative drama, the photos depict the business of the art world in stark, natural light. The results are humorous, seedy, and honest.

The exhibition is up until October October 27th. See more photos from the show after the jump.

Images courtesy of Andy Freeberg and Kopeikin Gallery.

Tokujin Yoshioka’s Prismatic Installation Created With 500 Light Reflecting Crystals




Tokujin Yoshioka is one of the more famous contemporary artists today, even if his website’s bio modestly (or jokingly) claims His works, which transcend the boundaries of product design, architecture, and exhibition installation, are highly evaluated also as art.” His current career retrospective at Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo is titled Tokujin Yoshioka_Crystallize, a play on both the artist’s tendency to utilize both light and crystals in his work, as well as the idea of the alternate definition of crystallizing, meaning to give form to.

The exhibition, which is Yoshioka’s largest solo show to date, consists of well-known and previously un-shown pieces, though certainly centers around the immersive sculptural installation, Rainbow Church (pictured above). The installation is forty feet tall and consists of 500 light-refracting crystal prisms which  project rainbow hues in the gallery space.

In a description of the piece for Fast Company, Margaret Rhodes describes the work, “The spare aesthetic doesn’t make it easily apparent, but Rainbow Church is influenced by an experience from his early 20s, when he visited Henri Matisse’s Rosaire Chapel in Vence, France. “I had a mysterious experience of being filled with overwhelming light and vibrant colors,” the artist says in a press release. “A dream to build architecture like this chapel came up to me strongly.” In a departure from the tangible materials he’s used in the past–foil for chairsfeathers for a snow-themed art installation–he’s building with light, the most ephemeral material of all.”

Other works also utilize the ethereal qualities of refraction, such as Ray of Light (below) also emits a rainbow glow, this time via a transparent crystal structure. The gallery walls are again activated by the light, as the gallery space is changed by the sculpture itself. (via designboom and fast company design)

Eugenio Recuenco Recreates Picasso Paintings Through A Contemporary Lens

Eugenio Recuenco

Eugenio Recuenco

Eugenio Recuenco

Eugenio Recuenco

Spanish photographer Eugenio Recuenco has taken the timeless and iconic work of the notorious artist Pablo Picasso and translated it into contemporary photography. He models each photograph in this series after a single Picasso painting, recreating it as a seductive, contemporary photograph. Each painterly photograph is taken in such a way that even these real life women seem to be painted onto a canvas. Having had his hand in commercial and fashion photography, the influence from modern high fashion can be seen. Because Picasso’s work contains such vivid colors and a strongly recognized cubist style, the model’s make-up and clothing are a vital part of what allows the photograph to imitate Picasso’s paintings.

Cubism, the artist’s most famous stylistic period, is achieved by dissecting parts of the subject in the painting, and breaking them down into geometric forms. In this case, the subjects in the photos are women covered in geometric patterns imitating Picasso’s paintings. Recuenco brilliantly achieves this reference to Cubism not only by the women’s clothing, but also by the perfectly placed photo fragments. Several of the photos in this series are altered so that there is an abrupt crop in the image, with extra limbs on the other side. This cleverly recreates Picasso’s ever-popular figures with extra legs, arms, or eyes. Some may say that there are just some things you can do in a painting that you cannot do in a photo. Recuenco proves this wrong with his incredible and imaginative use of make-up to mirror Picasso’s fractured portraits and misplaced facial features. In one photo, an entirely new eye is created, while in another, a sharp, black line dissects a woman’s face. Intelligent and original creativity is of no shortage in this photographer’s unbelievably beautiful series paying homage to a fellow Spanish artist.

Make sure to check out Eugenio Recuenco’s new project, a short film titled “A Second Defeat.”

Cyber Monday Sale- Save 45% Off The Entire B/D Shop!

The big sale that you’ve all been waiting for is finally here! Beautiful/Decay’s massive
45% off sale starts right now and ends at midnight tonight. Get 45% off all Beautiful/Decay books, magazines, apparel, accessories, and even items on sale. Just use discount code: HOLIDAZE during check out and save big!


Haunting And Ethereal Photographs Of Wardrobes Frozen In Ice

Ethereal Photographs

Ethereal Photographs Ethereal Photographs Ethereal Photographs

Environmental and seasonal artist Nicole Dextras is no stranger to using ice as a medium. For her series, “Iceshifts,” Dextras combines ice and clothing to create deconstructed wardrobes frozen in time, then photographs them up close and within natural settings. Often, the clothing has been frozen over several winters, creating layers and layers of ice. When Dextras composes her photography, she positions the blocks of ice to effect beautiful light refractions, giving the work a haunting and ethereal glow. The clothing appear to be specimens, ready to be excavated and studied. Sometimes, Dextras will include plants or leaves when creating her pieces; she’s even used stockings for arms and bras as wings to illustrate the many layers of the self .

Dextras explains, “This frozen wardrobe acts as a metaphor for the multilayered affinities between the self and the environment. On a deeper level, the mercurial aspect of ice alludes to the transient nature of the environment and of the inherent poetic beauty of the ephemeral.” (via my modern met)

Book 4 Sneak Peek: the printer’s proof!

Book 4, Printer's Proof: cover

Book 4, Printer's Proof: cover

So folks… here it is! We’ve got the printer’s proof of Book 4 here at Beautiful/Decay headquarters and we’re excited to share this tape-bound, post-it-riddled version with you, our dedicated readers. Our Exquisite Corpse issue will be sporting a fluorescent yellow spot color throughout the book, front & back fold-out spreads, an array of eye-mesmerizing patterns, and one-of-a-kind type treatments. There’s so much more to it than that, but if we gave you any more details than we couldn’t call this a sneak peek, now could we? Subscribe early as there’s only a couple weeks left to reserve your very own copy of this exquisite issue. Enjoy!