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Kinetic Ball Bearing Sculpture Imitates Ocean Tide

Tommi Grönlund and Petteri Nisunen. Tommi Grönlund and Petteri Nisunen.

Grönlund-Nisunen – Unstable Matter – 2013 from Tommi Grönlund-Petteri Nisunen on Vimeo.

Art duo Grönlund-Nisunen (Tommi Grönlund and Petteri Nisunen) have been working together since 1993. Technology, sound and light are the base materials of their work. The artists examine issues such as space and physical phenomena. Their sophisticated installations often play with the physical laws of nature and explore sound and space in a modest, low-tech manner. Originally trained as architects, their examination of urban/social space and nature still makes up a large part of their work. In addition to numerous solo and group exhibitions, they have also completed major commissions in public spaces.

In their new piece titled Unstable Matter, several thousand steel balls have been placed on a 150 x 150 cm large metal surface, which subtly tilts from one side to the other. Depending on the inclination angle, the balls begin to roll to the lower edges, continually forming changing patterns. The natural sound of the steel balls rolling back and forth creates a zen like sound of waves moving in and out of the ocean, reminding us all that life can be calm at one moment and yet shift at any given moment. (via)


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X-Rated Legos

This is definitely not for the kids! These creations have a level of realism that almost replicate department store mannequins. At the same time the blocky-pixelation effect of lego pieces adds to the whole X-rated theme.

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Yoshitoshi Kanemaki’s Surreal Hand Carved Sculptures Of The Super-Ego

Yoshitoshi Kanemaki - Sculpture

Yoshitoshi Kanemaki - Sculpture

Yoshitoshi Kanemaki - Sculpture

Yoshitoshi Kanemaki - Sculpture

Yoshitoshi Kanemaki sculpts incredible life-sized metaphors from camphor wood. Once he finishes chiseling in each furrowed brow and dabbing on painted flesh, what stands before him is a character that is beyond human. All of Kanemaki’s subjects seem to be between thoughts, complex humans who are plagued by existential terror while simultaneously wondering if they left the stove turned on.

One sculpture, a many-headed girl, shows every shade of expression from happiness to surprise. A six-eyed woman glances left, right, and straight ahead at the ground. It’s almost as though Kanemaki has sought to capture the various elements of the psyche in action — a glimpse of id, ego, and super-ego at play.

Just as his previous sculptures, Kanemaki riffs on the theme of emergence. Mirror images are attached like siamese twins. A peculiar case of mistaken, misplaced, or misremembered identity, it’s diffiult to tell which is real and which is doppelganger. (via Laughing Squid)

Surreal Paintings Of The Human Anatomy Like You’ve Never Seen It Before

Valerio Carrubba painting1 Valerio Carrubba painting8

Valerio Carrubba painting2

The highly detailed paintings of Valerio Carrubba offer an unexpected combination of styles that strangely complement each other.  His scenery and figures seem to emerge from a Renaissance and Baroque tradition.  Mysterious hands pull and cut at the flesh revealing each subject’s inner anatomy in a nearly cold way very similar to modern anatomy atlases.  The scene as a whole, however, bears the definite influence of surrealism. Carrubba works these various styles and aesthetic sensibilities as skillfully as the oil paint.  The boundaries are seamless and carefully worked.

Berndnaut Smilde’s Indoor Cloud Collection

Berndnaut Smilde

Berndnaut Smilde

Berndnaut Smilde – Making Clouds from The Avant/Garde Diaries on Vimeo.

When viewing (usually photographic) evidence of Dutch artist Berndnaut Smilde‘s  fantastical cloud works, the first question is usually: “Is it real?”

Yes, it’s actually a small, perfect indoor cloud.

The next question you might have is “How?” The answer is shrouded in Smilde’s process, which requires deftly precise observations of humidity, temperature, air movement and lighting. Existing for just one perfect moment, then slipping away, his clouds are carefully documented via photograph, but in the video above—the viewer gets a glimpse at the cloud-making event, narrated by the artist. The strange, beautiful creations appear and fades, serving as both a physical phenomena and a lilting metaphor for grasping at the ephemeral.

Michael Skattum

Michael Skattum is another one of those artists that seems to barely exist outside of Flickr- which is a shame. His serigraphs and paintings of 3d melting monsters will leave your eyes weeping for more.

Nicholas Hlobo


Nicholas Hlobo is a South African artist based in Johannesburg whose work often revolves around the idea of duality, especially as seen in the South African Xhosa culture. The contrast between feminine and masculine sexuality is of special interest to Hlobo, as well as “comfort, shelter, protection, beauty, cleanliness, sacred space, pleasure and fantasy.” An intense collection of work that gracefully explores some of humanity’s founding instincts.