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Artwork Of The Day: Everything Was Beautiful…

Meryl Pataky

Poetic and haunting neon installations by Meryl Pataky. The slight shift in color in the letters in the piece above is absolutely amazing.

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Anika Lori’s Psychedelic Collage Madness

anika lori

Welcome to the psychedelic dream world of Anika Lori. Prepare to enter an alternative dimension of visual overload.

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Jaimie Warren’s Playful Pop Culture Selfies Subvert The Form’s Perceived Vanity

Self-portrait as Pretzel Rod Stewart

Self-portrait as Pretzel Rod Stewart

Self-portrait as Lasagna Del Rey

Self-portrait as Lasagna Del Rey

Self-portrait as woman in Les Demoiselles d'Avignon by Pablo Picasso

Self-portrait as woman in Les Demoiselles d’Avignon by Pablo Picasso

Self-portrait as Yoda in L'admiration by William-Adolphe Bouguereau

Self-portrait as Yoda in L’admiration by William-Adolphe Bouguereau

Selfies are a ubiquitous mode of self-expression. Photographer and performance artist Jaimie Warren integrates pop culture. humor, and a bright color palette to create visually striking self-portraits that are absurd, humorous, and campy. In one photo series, Warren becomes celebrity-food characters, fusing their names into an offbeat expression. In another, she re-creates images from art history, embellishing them with her signature pop culture camp style. Warren’s selfies subvert the form of traditional portraiture by using absurdity and grotesqueness to supplant the selfie’s identification with vanity. In addition to her individual projects, Warren also co-directs an internationally touring “faux-cable access show” called Whoop Dee Doo, a nonprofit that partners with youth organizations to introduce kids to wonderfully strange art that is meaningful, fun, and compelling. (via la monda and vice)

Chris Ballantyne’s Slightly Dysfunctional Landscapes

Chris Ballantyne Chris Ballantyne Chris Ballantyne

A curious emptiness permeates the work of painter Chris Ballantyne. Pulling inspiration from the flat, graphic façades of industrial buildings and cookie-cutter suburban streets, Ballantyne merges elements of the banal with the absurd. Upon closer inspection, the vibrant, delicately rendered landscapes reveal strangeness that showcases the artist’s wry, observation-based humor. A giant cavern appears between bright, friendly row houses, surfers ride breakers down a peaceful mountain stream and a tiny footbridge spans a huge geological tear through a grassy plateau—shifting the viewer’s expectation of what “should” appear in the context of each frame.

His subdued, sophisticated color sense marries well with the stark, simplified structures Ballantyne creates. He intentionally omits visual information in the hopes that viewers will instead focus on the subtlety of each scene, their attention swallowed by the strange beauty of each place. The empty, isolated nature of the subject matter also quietly points to our own relationship to space, built structures and contemporary landscape.

Rafael Gómezbarros’ Giant Ant Installations Shed Light on the Plight Of Migrant Workers

Rafael Gómezbarros
Rafael Gómezbarros
Rafael Gómezbarros
 Rafael Gómezbarros

Casa Tomada is a project of traveling installations started in 2007 by Colombian artist Rafael Gómezbarros in which giant sculptures of ants are fixed in swarms on buildings and structures. Self-described as “urban intervention” by Gómezbarros, the ants have been showcased in locations varying from London to Cuba with a very specific goal in mind: shedding light on immigration, forced displacement, and uprooting through historical points of departure for travelers and immigrants. The 2-foot ants themselves are crafted out of tree branches for legs and two joined skull casts made of fiberglass resin and fabric to make up the torso, making for a particularly morbid, visceral depiction of migrant workers in Latin America who are looked at as nothing more than vermin.

When placed on the facades of government buildings and blank gallery walls alike, the ants give off a chilling sense of foreboding and encroachment. By placing them in swarms, Gómezbarros makes the insects even more strikingly representative of the peasants displaced by war and strife in Gómezbarros’ native Colombia. The giant insects that make up Casa Tomada, which translates to Seized House, are certainly works that are bound to linger with viewers, whether in nightmares or otherwise.

Interview with Videos Collide artist Matt Barton


Featuring live animatronics!

Matt Barton mixes artificial and natural, jest and earnest, high and low technologies in an attempt to blur the borders that separate, promoting a sense of totality and oneness of reality. He instills a bit of wonder in the lightest possible sense; tickling a remote nerve ending in the imagination and stimulating atrophied curiosity. Watch out for wired-up woodland creatures, video games, and the unexpected surprise sense that you are watching yourself as you are performing familiar routines…

John Squire on Cy Twombly

I’m really into these TATE Britain Artist “Shots” lately. All under 5 minutes or less, they’re succinct little vignettes that are informative, yet still short and sweet. Here’s a bite of John Squire, an amazing musician and artist (from my hometown in England of Manchester) who was in the Stone Roses talking about Cy Twombly.

Antonia Basler’s Surreal Photoshopped Family Photos

Antonia Basler photography9 Antonia Basler photography3

Antonia Basler photography2

Photographer Antonia Basler‘s series Content Aware makes use of a Photoshop tool of the same name.  The content aware tool is used to erase objects from images and replace the space with content the program judges to be appropriate.  Basler’s series begins with old family photos.  She’s highlighted the faces of the photo’s subjects and applied the tool, then highlighted the inverse and applied the tool for a second image.  The resulting images are a cyber sort of surreal, like a creepy reality glitch.  [via]