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Jesus Leguizamo’s Glitchy Paintings Are Realistic Yet Abstract

Jesus Leguizamo - Painting

Jesus Leguizamo - Painting Jesus Leguizamo - Painting

Jesus Leguizamo - Painting

Colombian painter Jesus Leguizamo combines realistic elements of portraiture with abstract, creating surreal pieces that sing with emotion. His paintings look almost like oil-on-canvas renditions of glitch art, his subjets interrupted with splotches of colors and smears of paint.

Leguizamo’s paintings feel like intimate peeks into someone’s emotional state of mind, and his expressive brushstrokes seem to convey a raw sense of confusion or mental tumult. There’s a dynamism to his paintings, as though they’re a motion capture camera snapping just one frame of his subject. According to Saatchi Art, Leguizamo explores human fragility with “his depictions of people [that] erases and blurs that which defines the human being – the face. ” (via I Need a Guide)

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Noriko Ambe’s Sublime Traces

I know I’ve seen the book on the left circulating on all sorts of blogs, I had been wondering who’s work it was. Now I share the wisdom.

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Alvaro Arteaga Sabaini

Alvaro Arteaga Sabaini

Chilean designer and illustrator Alvaro Arteaga Sabaini has a wide scope of work in genres from band illustrations to product marketing. I love the one above titled “Ziggy Stardog”! We have a Ziggy Stardog too in the office too, but he doesn’t look like that one.

Will Penny

will_penny_01 Will Penny is an artist from Woodstock, Ontario. His art is a study in how he processes info visually and conceptually. Each design is as vibrant and energetic as the next. 

Photos of Hyperrealistic Dolls And Their Mothers Blur The Lines Between Real And Unreal

Jamie-Diamond-1 Jamie-Diamond-2 Jamie-Diamond-10 Jamie-Diamond-12

Four years ago, photographer Jamie Diamond bought a hyperrealistic doll known as a Reborn baby off eBay, and this purchase lead her to a project spanning nearly two years. Called Mother Love, the series blurs the lines between real and unreal, living and the inanimate.

To make this project possible, Diamond collaborated with an outsider art community called the Reborners. They’re a group of self-taught female artists who hand-make, collect, and interact with these dolls. They hold them, dress them, wash their hair, and take them for walks in the park. “After spending a year investigating and recording their practice,” Diamond writes in an artist statement, “I chose to become a Reborner to gain a better understanding of the community.” Diamond continues:

In Nine Months of Reborning, I reborned dolls and constructed a working nursery in my studio and on eBay, called the Bitten Apple Nursery. Before putting the dolls up for adoption on eBay, I photograph each one using a large format camera, the image becomes the remnant of this exchange.

Creating the dolls was a laborious process. Some required up to 80 individual layers of painting, veining, blushing mottling, and toning, cured with heat. Strands were individually attached to the scalp. The dolls were weighted properly so that they feel like a real baby when held in someone’s arms.

The Amy Project  followed this construction.  “I invited celebrated Artists from the community to individually interpret and idealize the same doll,” Diamond writes. “I then photograph each doll mimicking vernacular school portraits. Each of the dolls are unique to their maker’s hand, but share an uncanny similarity through their common origin.

Diamond no longer calls herself a Reborner, and plans to sell the remaining dolls on eBay (although she might keep one for herself).

Working with the Reborn community has allowed me to explore the grey area between reality and artifice where relationships are constructed with inanimate objects, between human and doll, artist and artwork, uncanny and real. I have been engaged with this community now for four years and while working and learning from these women, I’ve become fascinated by the fiction and performance at the core of their practice and the art making that supports their fantasy. (Via Hyperallergic)

Psycho or Sweet Boyfriend?


I’m not sure whether  Brusse’s love based mini-installations make me embarrassed that my boyfriend doesn’t care enough to carve leftover watermelons or mush raw meat patties for a surprise love note, or extremely glad I’m not dating a psychopath who messes with my groceries. I’m sorry, but I almost feel like his work is just  one, tiny non-returned phone call step away from a nasty note keyed into my car and a court-issued restraining order. Am I really that cynical? What’s wrong with some roses and a post-it note on the door? Is re-tiling your entire bathroom ceiling in red and white squares that say “I love you” design faux-pas or grand beaux-arts? What do you think….sweet or sour?

Joshua Cobos’ Photographic Athropological Investigations

Joshua Cobos lives and works in San Francisco. He has a knack for capturing subtle irony and humor wherever he takes his camera. The implications in his photographs range from bitingly satirical to piercingly veritable. His work is the most successful when presenting a scene that was in some way affected by human intervention. Our actions on this planet run the gamut from inspirational to downright bizarre. Luckily there are photographers like Cobos who present our faults and triumphs honestly.    

Platonov Pavel’s Dark Mystery

Platonov Pavel’s portraits of a figure wearing a ski mask are full of rich psychological mystery and intrigue. They take a basic subject matter and create a complex narrative with just a few elements and well placed use of color.