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Isobelle Ouzman Turns Discarded Books Into Sculptural Works Of Art

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Illustrator Isobelle Ouzman upcycles would-be discarded books into sculptural works of art. She cuts back the pages and draws nature scenes that together, create an alluring new narrative. The primarily black-and-white images have spots of color added to them, and they hearken the viewer into this special place.Ouzman calls her creations Altered Books.

Using an X-acto knife, Micron pens, watercolor paint, and a lot of love, Ouzman breathes new life into these objects. “Every book that I alter was found by a dumpster in Seattle, a recycling bin, a thrift store, or was given to me by someone who no longer wants it,” she writes. “Rather than have these discarded books sit out in the rain or in some store to gather dust, I’m striving to make good use of them. I love books very much and would never carve into one that was valuable. I just want to give them a new life and a second chance to mean something again.

Ouzman takes commissions on these Altered Books in her Etsy shop. (Via Hi Fructose)

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Mikael Takacs Creates Superb Blurred Portraits Using Paper Marbling Techniques

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Mikael Takacs hand paints blurry portraits, distorted by a paper marbling effect. The outline of the portraits are clean and clear. From far, what’s inside the shapes seems messy and confusing but if we take a closer look it appears structured, almost forming a pattern. There’s a fine line between Mikael Takacs’ paintings and digital rendering. The diamond shaped patterns and the perfectly balanced and harmonized colors lead to confusion.

The artist applies acrylic painting onto an horizontal canvas with droppers to prevent the liquid from overflowing. He then painstakingly drags paint with small tools like sticks and combs in order to distort the portrait. The intricate work creates regular lines and shapes. If we look closely, we can see feathers, spirals and regular waves. The colors used are a blend of dark turquoise, camel and fuchsia. A color scheme that makes the series identifiable.

Mikael Takacs knows all the people he is depicting. He prefers to blur the lines and to present an abstract artwork. According to him, abstract art makes the dialogue between the viewer and the piece of art more interesting. The artist paints just enough for us to begin to have a idea of what we are looking at and leaves us halfway. To follow our imagination and introspect is the purpose of these paintings as they can lead to a million different interpretations.

Mikael Takacs’ work will be exhibited at Galleri Ramfjord in Oslo, Norway, in spring 2016. (via Hi Fructose).

Christopher Boffoli’s Giant Food World And Its Tiny Residents

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Photographer Christopher Boffoli continues his popular his Big Appetites series.  The series of photographs captures tiny people living in a giant culinary world.  These inhabitants explore, work, and even get into trouble with their huge food surroundings.  Despite its whimsical appearance, the series has a more serious grounding.  Big Appetites reflects America’s complex relationship with food.  The consumption of food – not only by eating it, but by reading and watching television about it – is ubiquitous, as if we lived in a giant world of food.

Photographer Hal’s Shrink Wrapped portraits

Loving these bizarre and grotesque photographs of shrink wrapped couples by Japanese artist Photographer Hal. They are beautiful, macabre,  and frightening all at once.

Heather Marie Scholl Proves “It’s Hard Being a Woman” Through Feminist Embroidery

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Merging art, fashion, and feminism, Heather Marie Scholl uses hand-embroidered textiles and knit works of art to make social statements. In her latest project, “Sometimes It’s Hard to Be a Woman,” Scholl combines her own “personal narrative with larger conversations about the body, women, feminism, identity, and sexuality” to address male-on-female domestic violence and empower its victims.

Ironically alluding to Tammy Wynette’s song, “Stand by Your Man,” and imagined as a means of visual storytelling, the fashion installation project will present several of Scholl’s creations, spanning embroidery, clothing, and sculpture. The subjects of the garments and textiles featured in “Sometimes It’s Hard to Be a Woman”—which Scholl playfully refers to as her “second coming out”—range from portraits of women to quotations both empowering and unsettling. Given its highly potent and deeply personal content, it is no wonder that Scholl describes the sentiment behind the project as “an amazing ‘fuck you’ attitude.”

Be sure to check out Scholl’s intricate and empowering pieces at FiveMyles Gallery in Brooklyn, New York. “Sometimes It’s Hard to Be a Woman” will be on view through November 7.

Awesome Video Of The Day: Going West

 

A beautifully shot short  by Andresen M Studio that was created entirely from cut and animated book pages. Watch the full video after the jump.

Zadok Ben David’s Metal Figurative Sculptures Look As If They Are Made Of Intricate Lace

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Sculptures looking like lace drawings floating in the air. Zadok Ben David, an Israeli artist based in London is using metal to create magic and illusion. A personal mean he chooses to connect culture and innovation.

From far, the sculptures seem indistinct, projecting only a large silhouette. Up close, we are able to discern the intricate details that form the shape. Zadok Ben David laser cuts the  metal to generate the irregular patterns covering the surface. The pieces should not be visualized from one angle. By circling around the pieces we uncover the hidden feature: the flatness of the sculptures. The artist is playing with volumes, going from 2 dimensional to a make belief 3 dimensional structure.

Zadok Ben David depicts human bodies in unusual postures. The individuals seem to be in the middle of an inner contemplation and the artist have caught them by surprise. He is rendering spontaneous moments and delivering them to us. The artist’s meaning behind the figurative sculptures is to question humankind’s place in the world. This notion of presence is channeled by the representation of the botanical inspired motifs, the airy silhouettes and the harmonious combination of it all.