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Jeffrey Meyer

Jeffrey Meyer

 

Jeffrey Meyer‘s  latest investment is creating a series of collages. Maybe not a series, but a bunch of collages. They’re retro and weird and fun and bright and everything we here at Beautiful/Decay love and adore… including space and high-waisted pants.

 

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Made With Color Presents: Pop Culture And Vintage Comics Colide In The Work Of Emmett Potter

Emmett Potter - Design 40Emmett Potter - Design 36Emmett Potter - Design 35Brawl_BlackFinal.jpgWe’re glad to introduce, via the website building platform Made With Color, new artists weekly. Made With Color is an interactive website builder helping creative people design their portfolio without a complicated set up. The templates are minimalistic in their structure and their colors, allowing the eyes of the readers to focus on the art pieces.  This week we’re excited to share the work of Made With Color user Emmett Potter.

Vibrant colors and figurative shapes live in Emmet Potter’s art pieces. The artist uses mid 20th century comic graphics, advertisements, found objects and photography. His subjects therefore become mixed media pieces blending collage and paint. He calls them ‘handmade ready-mades’. Characters in action involving guns, missiles, love and war in a vivid and  expressive environment. The content depicted by Emmett Potter is inspired by Pop culture and Jungian archetypes. A chosen process to help increase communication with the mass and unfold collective consciousness. The rendering takes the form of traditional canvas paintings or unusual sculpture composition.

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Lauri Lynnxe Murphy’s Bee Allergy Doesn’t Stop Her From Collaborating With Them

Murphy - sculpture

Toward Obliteration, 2012  Ash wood, Glass, Laser-cut Baltic Birch and 4000 live Honeybees

Toward Obliteration, 2012 Ash wood, Glass, Laser-cut Baltic Birch and 4000 live Honeybees

Lauri Lynnxe Murphy - sculpture

From 2010 to the present, Lauri Lynnxe Murphy has been collaborating with bees in the creation of her artwork.  Despite a bee allergy, Murphy remains committed to her practice, which she describes as being “research-based.”  Seeking to understand the nature of bees, Murphy depends on them to make works such as Listen, symbolizing the need to pay attention to the signals bees use for communication.  Or We’re Sorry, Murphy’s apology and simultaneously the bees’ apology for any disruption either collaborator may have caused the other.  Similarly, her honeycomb sculptures are co-created with the bees.  Murphy chooses to work with bees, or other materials that she feels allow her to appropriately explore issues surrounding ecological and political concerns.

Other than the current threat to the bee population Murphy has recently been concerned about nuclear power, particularly following the tsunami-induced collapse of Fukushima.  Murphy produced a series titled, Doilies of Imminent Destruction.  That’s an amazing title for some pretty delicate work.  The series began as a “meditation on the banality of our dialogue surrounding our fearsome power to irreparably alter an environment, and an investigation into the corporately chosen, idealized representations of these disaster sites prior to the disaster.”  Each doily depicts the site of a nuclear disaster: Chernobyl, Deepwater Horizon, Fukushima and Three Mile Island.  Why doilies?  Murphy recognizes the doily’s function as beautifying, or covering up the ugly or tarnished.  They also reference an old-fashioned nostalgia of domesticity and desired perfection.

I am drawn to Murphy’s work not for the beauty of it, although it is quite captivating, but rather for the delicate, yet powerful call to arms it requests of the viewer.  Whether it is her work about nuclear disasters subtly imploring us to concern ourselves with the danger of this technology, or her work about bees suggesting we need to be aware of the beauty and vulnerability of the bee’s ecosystem, Murphy’s work merits our contemplation.

Lothar Hempel

Lothar Hempel

Best known for his series of painted portraits, Lothar Hempel goes far into the idea of art as three dimensional- he plays the role of director in arranging space in order to create a script. Mixing larged diamond shaped photomontages, sculptures and painting, the whole with flashy colors and geometrical shapes, “Kats, Nerves, Shadows & Gin” plays with the mind of the viewer, to whom he offers to create his own story, in relation with his own psychological character.

Franco Brambilla

Mixing vintage with sci-fi

Hotel Ambasciatori

Franco Brambilla seems to have taken our most odd dreams and brought them to some kind of reality. Is it a painting? A photograph? Something else entirely, or all of the above? I love the feeling of as if I were watching To Catch a Thief or The Sound of Music on the newly-dubbed “Sy-Fy” channel.

Erika Lizée’s Installations Of Surreal, Flowing Forms Pull Us In To the Other Side

Erika Lizée - Acrylic on DuralarErika Lizée - Acrylic on DuralarErika Lizée - Acrylic on DuralarErika Lizée - Acrylic on Duralar

Artist Erika Lizée re-imagines reality in twisted, magnificent forms that bend through our world and into the next. In her incredibly installations, she uses acrylic on Duralar, a translucent kind of film that allows light to pierce through some of the work. They are paintings that have sprung into the third dimension. Lizée’s sculptures are like otherworldly beings, shifting in and out of our world’s outer boundaries. By using Trompe l’oeil painting technique, she creates an illusion that you can see this other being behind the wall of the gallery. It is as if there is a magical world that we now have the chance to peer in to.

The mysterious and ominous mood that is created from Lizée’s large, flowing installations reflects her intent to express the beauty and mysteries of life. Her work seems to be in a state of flux, shifting back and forth, expanding and contracting. The artist explains that this shift is like the collective consciousness that is continuously altered by scientific discovers and new experiences. The way in which we think of the world and understand our environments are constantly being redefined

All of this combines with the complex ways in which we internally create our own notions of reality based on perceptions, beliefs, and filter.

Erika Lizée’s breathtaking installations pull us in to a foreign space of flux and transformation.

The installations serve as a metaphor for the journey of our personal and shared life experiences.

Old Navy Causes A Stir With Insulting Anti-Artist T-Shirts

Old Navy, T-Shirts - Product Design Steve Ogden, T-Shirts - Product Design

Anyone who has ever pursued a liberal arts career has probably heard the opinion: that there’s no future in the arts, or at the very least, it’s going to be extremely difficult. While the latter is probably true (Rome wasn’t built in a day, and so on), the bias against the arts—often in favor of science and the trades—is highly prevalent in our public discourse.

Old Navy recently attracted some heat by releasing two “funny” toddler tees, both emblazoned with the “YOUNG ASPIRING ARTIST” motto, with “ARTIST” crossed out. Scrawled beneath are two alternative career paths: “Astronaut” and “President” (although, really, we don’t think these careers are any easier to attain). Twitter users voiced their offense, and soon after, artist Steve Ogden humorously modified the designs, overwriting “YOUNG ASPIRING OLD NAVY EXEC” with “ARTIST” and “HUMAN.” Here’s a response from the company, as published on artnet News:

“At Old Navy we take our responsibility to our customers seriously. We would never intentionally offend anyone, and we are sorry if that has been the case. Our toddler tees come in a variety of designs including tees that feature ballerinas, unicorns, trucks, and dinosaurs, and [they] include phrases like ‘Free Spirit.’ They are meant to appeal to a wide range of aspirations. With this particular tee, as a result of customer feedback, we have decided to discontinue the design and will work to remove the item from our stores.” (Source)

Overall, the initial designs and the subsequent outcry reminds us that we shouldn’t disparage our artists. For those who are determined, it is plausible to develop a career in such fields—and there is value in it. After all, who could live in a world without art? (Via artnet News)