Get Social:

Design Watch: Loll Designs

When I close my eyes and dream of outdoor furniture, I see visions of Loll’s cheery Vang Chairs, or whiling away the hours in their rocking Racer Chair , or napping in the shade on a 405 Chaise. Loll’s furniture has a strong architectural presence while remaining friendly and homey. See more after the jump.

Advertise here !!!

Nicholas Bohac

Nicholas Bohac printmaking


Nicholas Bohac is a San Francisco based artist who works with printmaking methods and acrylic based media. His two-dimensional paintings and drawings are an investigation of human influence on nature, and natures influence on humans. Bohac has created his own version of a modern day landscape, encouraging his audience to think about the ecological climate and human stweardship.

Advertise here !!!

Disturbing Typeface Imitates The Human Body


For his series Evolution of Type, the artist and graphic designer Andreas Scheiger creates living, breathing fonts; his ABC’s might be dissected like a human limb, revealing boney spines and straining ligaments. With surgical precision, the flesh of his curvy S is pulled back in a manner that is both grotesque and sensuous. In this strange marriage of art, language, and science, the artist is inspired in part by Victorian sentiments and the emergence of Charles Darwin’s On The Origin of Species and the theory of evolution, which spurred medical debate and disillusioned many a spiritualist.

Scheiger’s work is profoundly influenced by seminal Vicorian text The Alphabet and Elements of Lettering, written by Frederic W. Goudy, the designer behind famous typefaces like Copperplate Gothic and Goudy Old Style. Schneiger imagines the literal manifestations of Goudy’s analogies, which compared lettering to animated organisms; like creatures extinct and in existence, language too has a history, bringing with it the ability to record and preserve human thoughts and discoveries.

Within Schneiger’s imaginative font, E’s are skinned to reveal a muscular-skeletal system; deeper still, is a network of red and blue veins and capillaries that transport oxygen to some unknown organ. Much like actual bodies, these letters are capable of deterioration and decay; a G appears lifeless, mounted like dinosaur bones. Similarly, a P gets trapped and preserved in amber, and a prehistoric J is fossilized in stone. The terms “the life of language” or “the body of text” become spell-binding realities in this whimsical and thoughtful series. Take a look. (via KoiKoiKoi)

The Phraseology Project

In January 2011 Drew Melton got the idea to start designing user submitted words and phrases in order to practice his craft in community. In his own words, “Most design sites or blogs are merely feeds of disconnected visual stimulation. I wanted to do something that you could actually influence and invest into.” He quickly purchased the domain and setup a very basic submission form. Receiving over 90 submissions in the first week confirmed that people were interested and fueled the project forward. Ray Brown was soon brought on to help develop the new site. Phraseology was underway.

“The Phraseology Project is meant to be a running experiment in typography. It is meant to be a framework for exercise and practice in Typography. We try our best to come up with our best work always but more importantly we value practice and healthy process. In other words, these pieces aren’t perfect. But they are honest. We celebrate the process of design and creativity in all of its’ outcomes.” – Drew Melton

Stefano Galli’s High Speed Photographs Capture What It’s Like To Be A Cowboy

screen_shot_2015-11-10_at_91330_pmscreen_shot_2015-11-10_at_91307_pm screen_shot_2015-11-10_at_91717_pm screen_shot_2015-11-10_at_91631_pm

Within his series Cowboys, Italian born artist Stefano Galli captures the essence of the rodeo. When encountering Galli’s blurred displays of fast paced moments, at first glance, the images almost take on a painterly aesthetic. The blended earth tones enriched by small marks of what could be cadmium red mimic the sort of guttural intensity found in Abstract Expressionism. Yet, with further inspection, it becomes clear that these moments are, in fact, not abstract at all. Galli’s series displays a hyper specific sensibility of the rodeo — they go beyond what is physically there and take on the challenge to document both the visual and psychological affect the rodeo has on these cowboys. With a crowds of faceless faces, bucking broncos whose warped bodies begin to take the formation of something out of a Francis Bacon painting, and long, lingering lights that possess a cinematic feel, Galli is able to represent the true element of movement. His photographs are a clever answer to create a discourse on a challenging topic for a motionless medium: speed. But, more importantly, his images provoke not only a discourse on gesture, but also on control. What does it feel like to have control when all sense of homeostasis is disrupted? How does one remain in control? And further, through the distortion of the image, is Galli provoking the viewer to lose his or her control? Are we asked to let go of our need to make sense of what we’re seeing? Perhaps, for a moment, we should act on instinct. Delicate yet powerful, Stefano Galli truly exposes a contemporary visual thought process on an age-old tradition.

Artist Interview: Rick Silva


There’s no question that GIFs have had a long history on the Internet. We’ve been accidentally stumbling upon them for as long as we can remember. Usually, when we think of GIFs we usually don’t take it too seriously. Besides… the majority of them out there almost always include blinged-out text paired with unsightly some imagery. However, with the extreme popularity of Tumblr, GIF art has become the new and popular medium. Calgary, Canada’s Rick Silva’s has put his personal creativity into this art form; making sure to incorporate a balance between real-life landscape imagery and digital web geometry.

Beautiful/Decay Lecture At Loyola University New Orleans This Friday!

If you’re in the New Orleans area this Friday come by Loyola University to hear me talk about the history of Beautiful/Decay and the trials and tribulations of DIY publishing. I’ll be discussing how B/D began, how we morphed from a zine to a internationally distributed publication, working in the art/design world, and all the various projects we’ve been involved in along the way. The lecture presented by AIGA, starts at 7pm, and is open to the public. Hope to see and meet all of you there!

AIGA Loyala University New Orleans
Monroe Library
Multimedia room 1


Bruno Kurru

Bruno Kurru

Bruno Kurru, of Brazil, uses drawing, painting, photography and collage, mixing them together to create a singular kind of artwork. I think it’s safe to call him a “mixed media artist!”