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BEAUTIFUL/DECAY X ROYAL TALENS Amsterdam Trip PT. 1

I’m happy to present second installment of photographs from our amazing European trip with our friends over at Royal Talens And Canson. If you remember we started our trip in Paris and made our way over to Amsterdam, stopping along the way to check out all the museums, galleries, and sights that each city offered.

We started our first day in Amsterdam with a boat tour of the canals to get acquainted with the many tiny streets and canals that zig zag throughout the city. Along the way we saw many amazing examples of dutch architecture, design, street art and of course Houseboats!

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Milo Moire Drops Eggs From Her Private Parts To Create Abstract Paintings

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The German performance artist Milo Moire gives birth to her paintings… literally; in pushing eggs, filled with ink and acrylic paint, from her vaginal canal, she allows them to break and splatter onto a pristine white canvas. The unusual work, titled “PlopEgg,” necessitates that the artist be nude from head to toe, and it is the first of a series of similar performances at the opening of 2014’s Art Cologne fair.

For Moire, the work embodies the creative and spontaneous powers of femininity; her exposed body and vagina give rise to streaming rivers of earthy colors: rich reds, browns, and grays. The muddied hues recall human birth, from the breaking of the water to the release of blood; her hulking, straining body stands like a statue on high, and the act of labor is elevated, made majestic and potent. The visceral image of her lengthy squat, the cracking noise as egg hits pavement, serves as a testament to the symbolic strength of the vagina, the power of both woman and the creative mind to conceive and reproduce.

Inspired perhaps by Carolee Schneemann’s 1975 Interior Scroll (and even Casey Jenkins‘s recent vaginal knitting project), Moire uses her internal sex organ to birth something external and tangible, but she simplifies the process; where Schneemann removed complex words, Moire births primitive splashes of colors. In doing so, she doubles the sensuality and feminine context of her efforts; where text is often associated with maleness, the chaotic, free-flowing aesthetic of “EggPlop” is normally iconographically linked to womanhood.

At the close of her performance, the artist folds her paper canvas like a bed sheet, sweeping over it so as to transfer the paint from one side the another. In this way, the image is reproduced; like a cell divided, one becomes two. The symmetrical of the resultant image is also evocative of the female reproductive system, vividly mirroring the uterine structure. Take a look. (via Source Fed)

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Kanye West And Spike Jonze Collaborate On Short Film “We Were Once A Fairytale”

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Although We Were Once a Fairytale (2007) begins slowly, with Kanye West stumbling drunkenly around a nightclub, the short film offers strange but rare insight into the celebrity/artist/god’s psychological complexes in a totally strange and successful way. He accomplishes this by stabbing himself in a bathroom, and producing a rodent from his guts. One of the main criticisms thrown Kanye’s way (other than pointing to his spectacular ego) is his inability to express himself coherently, but in his collaboration with Spike Jonze, Kanye seems to accomplish seemingly genuine and recognizable sentiment.

At first all of your assumptions about Kanye are affirmed: seeing him act like a shithead around the club, pitching back and forth barely able to stand, he is almost too easy to dislike. It’s about halfway through, when he ends up in the bathroom alone, that things begin to change. After he stabs himself, the vulnerable and repulsive creature he extracts from his streaming red-ribbon viscera creates an inner layer of Kanye most people are perhaps even unwilling to concede to him. Depending on how you look at it, it could be as cheesy/naive Bound 2 music video, but it’s difficult not to respect Kanye for the attempt to bare something deeper even when he is bashed so vehemently by pretty much anyone. The film defies direct interpretations. You have a sense of what the rodent represents: something living within, curious and grotesque, but it’s difficult to make sense of his relationship to the creature when he hands it a miniature knife. The final shot of Kanye’s expression maintains the ambiguity of the event, and keeps you thinking about it long after.

 

Over 130 Gallons Of Paint Dumped In Busy Intersection

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Dutch artist Iepe Rubinigh and the  Anonymous Crew took the term “street art” very literally with their piece Painting Reality.  The group, equipped on bicycles, purposely spilled over 130 gallons of eco-friendly water soluble paint in a Berlin’s busy Rosenthaler Platz intersection.  The cars then acted as brushes spreading the various colors through street.  An abstract painting detailing the fluid-like flow of traffic unfolded over the next several minutes and 2,000 cars.  Painting Reality introduced pleasantly bright color to otherwise drab asphalt.  More than that, though, the “strokes” of paint documented the moving life of a city.  Check out the video to the see paint drop and spread.

Otto Rap’s Grotesque Graphite

Otto Rap hides these grotesque imagery in a delicate, graphite-rendered haze. Otto’s illustrations exude a natural flow of dark noise that vibrates with raw energy. But the way he executes it all, in a kaleidoscope explosion of beautiful pattern making, is what really does it for me.

Joe Forkan’s The Lebowski Cycle

Joe Forkan’s The Lebowski Cycle is a series of paintings and drawings exploring layered narratives, using masterpieces of western art and the Coen Brothers’ film The Big Lebowski as a point of departure. You can see what paintings each of the works are based on at Joe Forkan’s Blog.

Larson & Shindelman’s Geolocation Series Captures the Locations Behind Tweets

For their series Geolocation, Nate Larson and Marni Shindelman mined for Tweets with publicly available GPS coordinates. They then traveled to and photographed those data-suggested locations and present their photographs with said Tweets as captions. The results are sometimes funny, sometimes poignant, and successful in exposing perhaps how little people think of what data they are putting out into the world and how easily it can be appropriated.