Get Social:

Lee Misenheimer


Lee Misenheimer’s work uses very basic media– a lead pencil or ball point pen and off white paper– but he creates awesome illustrations with intense detail. He derives inspiration from Japanese art as well as organic textures, mushrooms, air, and wind. He has openly admitted to have repetitive line syndrome and after a long break from art, he’s back!  

Advertise here !!!

Dimitri Kozyrev Paints Disrupted Landscapes To Critique The Edges Of Art And War

Dimitri Kozyrev - Painting

Dimitri Kozyrev - Painting

Dimitri Kozyrev - Painting

Dimitri Kozyrev’s paintings are captivating, to say the least. His color precision from plane to line and surface to sky balances the ephemerally abstract beautifully with a hardened environment. This compositional fracturing feels like ice cracking on the pond, disrupting the reflection or illusion of us and our structures, before we crash into a new reality.

This “crash” echoes of Constructivism or Futurism, with deep contemporary critique on not just the disruption of landscape during wartime, but maybe even more so, the distortion of self, identity, and technology in relation to art and activism as these terms relate to the avant-garde, painting, and intention in today’s milieu.

On this note, Kozyrev elaborates:

“I have titled this body of work ‘Lost Edge.’ I use the word ‘edge’ because I draw a comparison between the notion of the avant-garde in war and the art world. In the early 20th Century, the avant-garde was at the height of its importance in both realms. Now, however, I maintain that just as the concept of the military avant-garde has been “lost,” because of changes in methods of warfare, the avant-garde in the contemporary art world, has also lost its edge.

“The source material for this body of work is images of ruins of the once mighty fortifications of the Mannerhiem Line, built to protect Finland from the advances of the Soviet military avant-garde. Finland’s attempt was valiant and not in vain; this war and the lives that were lost in 1939 are largely forgotten. The fortification lie in ruins, and nature is slowly reclaiming them. Similarly, the ‘cutting edge’ of the contemporary art world seems to have become blunted. Viewers of the avant-garde work of many visionary artists of the early 20th Century were shocked, challenged and inspired by The Malevich’s ‘Black Square’ and ‘Fountain’ of Marcel Duchamp. Because of changes in society, like changes in warfare, it has become difficult for today’s contemporary artist to generate the same level of response without resorting to vulgarity.”

Advertise here !!!

Glitz And Pixie Stix- Art Benefit For The Center For The Arts Eagle Rock


Pop over to Leanna Lin’s Wonderland at 5024 Eagle Rock Blvd. on July 27th from 6-10pm.  On the main gallery wall Leanna Lin’s Wonderland + Rooney Hardwick present Glitz & Pixie Stix “sugar plum dumpling rainbow faces with freckles on top”. 18 artists will be exhibiting whimsical paintings, mixed media art and plush, along with Center for the Arts Eagle Rock (CFAER) student “Clay Jammers” ceramics art! A portion of the art sales will be donated to the CFAER “Imagine Studio”, which is an after school enrichment program bringing arts back into the LAUSD. They currently serve 11 elementary and middle schools in the Northeast Los Angeles.

Tim Bergstrom & Denise Kupferschmidt @ Halsey McKay

Two of my favorite upcoming artists, Timothy Bergstrom & Denise Kupferschmidt recently opened up solo shows respectively @ Halsey McKay in East Hapmton. Tim brings a new suite of his gluey material paintings that visually imitate sounds, while Kupferschmidt shows a series of studies surrounding a sculptural installation, as well as a lovely mural. Good stuff, more after the jump.

The Culture Of Thailand’s Ladyboys

Soopakorn_Srisakul1 Soopakorn_Srisakul4 Soopakorn_Srisakul12Soopakorn_Srisakul8

In Thailand, the term ladyboy is a nickname for transgender women, and they are a population often met with intolerance and prejudice. Their place in society is explored through photographer Soopakorn Srisakul’s series Mistress, in which he captures the daily life of his girlfriend and four other ladyboys. They all work at bars and as call girls in the infamous red-light Nana district in Bangkok.

Srisakul’s images are his journey in understanding his partner and the others experiences. There are few positions that are hiring transgendered women, so this community typically finds work in department stores, makeup counters, and cabaret venues. Those that are bargirls generally make better the better wages, which allows them to save up for gender reassignment surgeries.

Mistress presents us with poignant pictures of both work and home. There are moments of dark clubs, sure, but there are also quiet scenes in bright bedrooms. Srisakul writes:

They go out working, come back to their room, go relaxing outside, occasionally go back to visit family in the countryside, and then go to work. They, like anyone else, just try to get by. They laugh for joy, cry for sorrow, they work to earn a living, and they have an argument with their boyfriend, just like anyone else. In this sense, what makes them so different from us as to warrant a harsh treatment from the moral society, and do they deserve it at all? (Via Feature Shoot)

Rob Prideaux’s Incredible photographs of Smoke And Fire

San Francisco based photographer Rob Prideaux’s exquisitely shot images of smoke and fire are a perfect example how a very simple subject manner can be pushed to a new level of creativity. Setting out to explore the aesthetics of smoke and fire Prideaux chose to minimally retouch the photos of fire and create heavily retouched patterned imagery out of the smoke. The result is triumph of aesthetic beauty, fires magnificence, and the intangible allure of smoke as it appears and disappears into the air in a matter of seconds. (via)

Timothy Callaghan Passes The Time With Paint

Timothy Callaghan Timothy Callaghan Timothy Callaghan

With simplified brushstrokes and a sophisticated sense of color, Ohio-based painter Timothy Callaghan‘s most recent works carefully construct a narrative around the passing of time. His eye for immediacy takes the form of crumpled love letters, a buzzing neon sign and the stillness of shirts hanging in a closet—each piece a quiet, tongue-in-cheek observation of daily life.

Callaghan released his first book this week through William Busta Gallery, highlighting his own work, as well as that of several other contemporary artists working in observational painting. Definitely worth a look.

Nadia Lee Cohen Photographs Nudes And Cultural Motifs In Campy Visualizations Of The 1950s-70s

Nadia Lee Cohen - Photography Nadia Lee Cohen - Photography Nadia Lee Cohen - PhotographyNadia Lee Cohen - Photography

The work of photographer Nadia Lee Cohen is a stimulating, modern take on vintage American and British style. Her diorama-esque compositions — with their nude, cigarette-smoking femme fatales and garish 1950s/60s/70s iconography — explode with color, attitude, and fetishized, retro-suburban life. Scattered throughout are bold insertions of cultural, consumer artifacts, from packs of Marlboro cigarettes, to Coca-Cola bottles, to lip-shaped telephones, which further emphasize the images’ glossy and style-saturated appeal. David Lynch and Alfred Hitchcock fans will certainly be able to identify a few crafty allusions; whether it is red curtains, or birds hovering menacingly in the background, Cohen has seamlessly meshed her own cinematic style with that of influential film directors, thereby creating a clever and campy pastiche of Western arts and culture.

When I asked Cohen what drives her work, she expressed that she primarily hopes that people enjoy the aesthetics of her photography, which is a “humorous, tongue-in-cheek” response to the way she views the world. And, aside from creating fascinating portraits of what she identifies as “strong, quirky, dark characters,” Cohen’s exploration of retro aesthetics through a modern lens provides a visible commentary on the way styles and cultural tastes have shifted over the decades — all from an alternative and progressive point of view; her work represents a range of personal styles, as well as a variety of body shapes and sizes. “I hope to convey a wider message of changing our perception of taste in terms of modern beauty ideals in fashion,” she explains, “which is why I tend to look to the interesting people around me rather than casting from agencies.”

Cohen has recently finished her MA in Fashion Photography at the London College of Fashion, and judging by her success and the in-depth nature of her style, she will be creating a lot of exciting work in 2015. Be sure to check out her website and Instagram. More adventurous (and amusingly retrospective) images after the jump. (Via Huffington Post)