Get Social:

Advertise here !!!

Debit De Beau’s Whimsical Photo Collages Capture Emotion

Debit de Beau - Collage

Debit de Beau - Collage Debit de Beau - Collage Debit de Beau - Collage

French artist Debit de Beau creates gorgeous photo collages that seem to inhabit their own world. With wide skies dwarfing tiny inhabitants, Beau’s artwork seems both expansive and a little lonely. 

Beau uses both illustration and textures, such cloth with raw edges, to liven up his collages. His landscapes meet at the intersection of the manmade and the natural world. A boy meets a whale just off a lighthouse’s shore, while a man walks his pet snail and considers a crossroads marked with all of life’s milestones: hope, loss, guilt, and success.

The emotional palette that Beau works with seems quite varied, his subjects by turn leaping joyfully off of a ferris wheel and pause, questioning a ladder that hangs from a lone window. The surreality of his collages aims to capture not a perfectly realistic scene but to cause emotional resonance, placing us in that person’s frame of mind. To climb or not to climb? Should I follow the snail? Or contemplate a quiet fall of rain? (via Optically Addicted)

Advertise here !!!

The Ethereal Photography Of Jason Mitchell Explores Figures Transcending Their Bodies Into A New Existence

Jason Mitchell - Digital Photography

Jason Mitchell - Digital Photography

Jason Mitchell - Digital Photography

Like floating into a dream, Jason Mitchell’s photography takes you into a new place of existence, stuck between worlds. His series Dream Away displays ghostly bodies in a different state of being, exploring a sense of awakening. Inspired by metamorphosis, his figures are placed in a blank space, not knowing exactly where they are except for in a place of uncertainty. Even still, they seem tranquil and ready for whatever is to come next. Each image contains an ethereal quality, as the figures delicately glide through the air. In this series, we cannot tell if Mitchell’s figures are falling or floating, as there is no sense of direction, like they are underwater. With bright whites and light shadows, the absence of almost all harsh shadows creates an angelic atmosphere around these women.

Hinting at themes of afterlife and a higher state of being, Mitchell’s figures almost do not appear to be human. They are transcending their bodies on a journey of oneself.

“I ask my subjects to explore a loss of control, but a sense that they are being guided, pushed and pulled by another sentient being, as they make their way to a new self. They represent the soul of a magical creature on a journey through the limbo that connects their past understandingto this new unknown.”

– Jason Mitchell

Although all of Mitchell’s work holds a striking beauty, his series Dream Away truly exhibits stunning detail and imagery. Photographs from this majestic series will be on view at 111 Minna Gallery in San Francisco, CA until May 30th.

Ross Racine

13_work

I was quite surprised when I found out the work of Canadian artist Ross Racine was completely hand-drawn. While some compositions are more realistic than others, all of them could pass fairly easily as documentary aerial photography of yesteryear, perhaps taken from government planes after the great post-war suburban explosion. Some of his drawings are minimal, some much more complexly textured; all present an interesting fictional view of suburban and rural America.

Adrian Dutt

Fantastic work by English illustrator Adrian Dutt. They feature exceptionally beautiful, detailed line work and a wonderful (slightly twisted) sense of humor.

Russell Tyler’s Goopy Shapes

We posted about Russell Tyler about a year and a half ago, and since then some of his paintings have taken a slight minimalist turn. Granted, it’s not trying to be Frank Stella, but instead of the werewolves and all-over smorgasbords of characters and color, he’s giving us more geometric shapes and patterns whose bright pink and blue zig zags give it a kind of LA-gear flare. The goopy application is still there and they’re still joyful as ever, but it’ll be interesting to see if where Russell ends up as he keeps blending Niki de Saint Phalle and more geometric shapes. I can’t wait to see more!

Ps. If you’re in San Francisco check out Russell’s show opening November 9th at Fouladi Projects!

Juan Francisco Casas’s Reckless Sexed Up 20 Somethings

 

I often wonder if art has benefited or been hurt by the invention of the digital camera. These easy to use machines have made everyone a “photographer”, giving a creative outlet to millions who otherwise would not take the time to learn the craft of photography. This has lead to millions of bad photos plaguing the internet of young hip 20 somethings, having fun, acting, out, getting drunk, and often times getting naked. These images get old after a while (even the nude ones!) but Spanish artist Juan Francisco Casas has managed to take these fleeting moments of excess, debauchery, and irresponsibility and slow them down in his magnificent hyper realistic drawings. By creating these detailed images Casas is asking us to question the very acts that so many of us took part in during our youth and at the same time pay homage to those fun years of reckless abandon. (via)

Ellen Jewett Sculpts Flowing Creatures Woven With Tiny Plants, Animals, And Objects

Ellen Jewett - Sculpture Ellen Jewett - Sculpture Ellen Jewett - Sculpture Ellen Jewett - Sculpture

Ellen Jewett is a Canadian artist who creates flowing sculptural fusions of plants, animals and objects. Among her mystical menagerie is a wild boar with shrubs growing from its mane, foxes with tails sprouting into grass, and a deer whose body resembles a tree-shrouded grove. As singular beasts, Jewett’s creatures are beautiful and dynamic, but look closer and you will see that each one is composed of tinier parts, microcosms of flora, fauna, and objects that weave seamlessly together. These layered components infuse each sculpture with multiple narratives, from celebrations of life and growth, to stories of death, decay, and burden in the form of manmade debris. As Jewett explains:

At first glance my work explores the more modern prosaic concept of nature: a source of serene nostalgia balanced with the more visceral experience of ‘wildness’ as remarkably alien and indifferent. Upon closer inspection of each ‘creature’ the viewer may discover a frieze on which themes as familiar as domestication and as abrasive as domination fall into sharp relief.  (Source)

Jewett makes the sculptures from the inside out, layering materials and utilizing negative space to create hollowed works that flow into the air around them: dense frames unravel into breezy foliage and empty space, creating habitats for fluttering, sculpted birds. The results of these disentangled bodies are creatures that speak their strengths via expressions of lightness, vulnerability, and emotion. Jewett describes this effect:

Over time I find my sculptures are evolving to be of greater emotional presence by using less physical substance: I subtract more and more to increase the negative space. The element of weight, which has always seemed so fundamentally tied to the medium of sculpture, is stripped away and the laws of gravity are no longer in full effect. In reading the stories contained in each piece we are forced to acknowledge their emotional gravity cloaked as it is in the light, the feminine, the fragile, and the unknowable.  (Source)

As part of her creative and flowing artistic practice, Jewett strives to free her work from materials with toxic properties, such as glazes, paints, and finishes. This greatly limits what she can use, but at the same time, incites her imagination and makes her work even more unique. “Where possible I source the natural, the local, the low impact and, always, the authentic,” she writes (Source). Check out Jewett’s website for more beautiful and holistic creations. (Via Lost at E Minor)