Get Social:

Yale University Releases 170,000 Incredible Photos Of The Great Depression

Photogrammar, Great Depression - Photography Photogrammar, Great Depression - Photography Photogrammar, Great Depression - Photography Photogrammar, Great Depression - Photography

In a database called Photogrammar, Yale has just released 170,000 searchable photos of the Great Depression. Previously stored away in the government archives, these are the unseen images taken by great photographers such as Dorothea Lange, Walker Evans, and Arthur Rothstein, all of whom were assigned by the Farm Security Administration to document the effects of the declining economy on the population. The database consists of a nation-wide map with clickable counties, each one leading to a gallery of snapshots from the region. Using the information from the Lot Number and Classification Tags systems developed by Paul Vanderbilt in 1942, the collection is searchable by photographer, lot number, and subject heading.

The result of Yale’s efforts is a fully interactive and fascinating glimpse into America from 1935 to 1946. Photogrammar tells the story of the Depression as it has never been seen before; from east to west (and including Hawaii and Alaska), we see rural laborers and townsfolk navigating the daily challenges of economic turmoil; there are signs of the oncoming war, as well. Despite being separated by a vast geography, each image is joined by a similar backdrop of hardship, endurance, and recovery.

Click here to explore Photogrammar for yourself. (Via Gizmodo)

Advertise here !!!

The Miaz Brothers’ Blurry Painting Portraits

When you first look at the paintings by the Miaz brothers, it doesn’t seem like there is much to see. A blurry collection of colors forming an incoherent image. Everything seems far away and out of focus. But something draws you to look closer, perhaps the fact that you can’t immediately comprehend the paintings when you see them. Their lack of detail demands additional attention, and you find yourself scanning them again and again as you put together the larger picture. Colors and patterns begin to stand out, and details slowly emerge. That demand for closer inspection draws you in, and makes you closely examine a painting, that at first glance, seems almost empty.

Advertise here !!!

Kyuin Shim’s Digital Sculptures Of Science Fiction Disfigurement

Kyuin Shim- Digital SculptureKyuin Shim- Digital SculptureKyuin Shim- Digital Sculpture
Kyuin Shim- Digital Sculpture

Korean artist Kyuin Shim creates work that your pupils will interpret as a straight up science fiction novel. One body of work in particular, “Black Black,” is a series of gruesome depictions of black mannequin bodies gone haywire. As a digital artist and sculptor, he works compiling 3D renderings of real images. These sculptures, with the glossy stature of high fashion, the black mannequins are enrobed in large blisters. In varying states of vulnerability, his sculptures are suffering implosion and meltdown; a person who has ripped his head off gives himself fellatio, another is on his hands and knees, expelling their entire insides. Shim’s creatures come across as gross exaggerations of real emotional states, and it is not always easy to interpret how they are intended, but it is evident that they are referential to the individual struggle that we all face.

Another series of his, featuring only white mannequins, is titled “Small Place,” and references interpersonal relationships and the implied metaphors within them.  The white series emanates an atmosphere of tranquility and calm. Mannequin lovers with bowls for heads pour water between one another, while others sit pensively. There is not the searing prospect of suffering that “Black Black” encompasses. “Small Place” is meditative and inviting. Although parts of Shim’s series have been cited as representing dysfunctional relationships, there is no real hostility in the work. It is interesting to look at both series of his work side to side and to take note of the drastic shift in tone.

Yochai Matos’ Installations Made Out Of Light

MatosInstallation12 MatosInstallation3 MatosInstallation6

Whether or not Yochai Matos is creating an installation to view inside or outside a studio space, he pays careful attention to the way light creates an atmosphere. For his indoor installations, existing studio light can make his work appear more ethereal, something to which “You Are a Saint” affirms. His work sometimes directly addresses the absence/presence of light, as in his outdoor installations “Landscape” and “Flame (Gate).” Because the perception of his work changes with the amount of light available for any installation, the experience of his work is as fluid as the experience of natural or artificial light in any given environment.

Made With Color presents: Bart Exposito’s Geometric Paintings Are Graphic Bliss

Bart Exposito - Painting 5 Bart Exposito - Painting 6 Bart Exposito - Painting 2 Bart Exposito - Painting 8

Made With Color is an online platform that allows artists to showcase their work without having to set up a complicated portfolio site. It helps create clean and sleek websites that are responsive for smart phones and tablets and best of all you can have your site up and running in minutes! Each week we, at Beautiful/Decay, pick a Made With Color user and share their artworks. This week, we present the exquisite work of Bart Exposito, an artist raised in Los Angeles and currently working in New Mexico.

Harmony between the graphic lines and the soft color schemes on the background. Bart Exposito’s paintings look like pure abstraction that hints at representation. The ‘Strange Alphabet’ series depict a gathering of lines that come together to weave a geometric alphabet that only the artist can decipher.  A subtle combination of shapes and colors speak to the viewer while enticing their imagination to wander and interpret the meaning.

Exposito is inspired by locations. His recent move to New Mexico has unleashed a new vision of the land and the sky. Transferred onto the canvas, his experiences are singular to his story. “The language of painting can occupy a space inherent to its own, affected by its surroundings, allowing me to conflate such disparate visual tendencies to create a personal, idiosyncratic, and nuanced body of work that could not have been produced in any other environment than New Mexico itself”. An invitation to the viewers to relate and share their story through the interpretation of his vivid paintings.

Color Shifting Art Uses RGB Lights To Change Scenes



Italian based artist team, Carnovsky, unveiled their RGB Fabulous Landscapes during Milan Design Week 2013. Their digital fresco’s were printed using an innovative technique by Italian company graphicreport. In plain light the landscapes, figures, architecture and atmospheres vibrate and the images are tangled with one another.

But when red, blue or green light is applied to the digital fresco’s a whole different series of pictures emerge. In the piece Atmospheric N. 1 the sky seems to be in a flux of sunrise, sunset and storm as the lighting changes.

In Landscape N.1 a room that seems to go back into infinity is taken over by a lush green landscape which then gives way to a centuries old battle scene.

Both the technique and the imagery are compelling and together the juxtaposition creates an ethereal and haunting effect. (via)

Makeup Artist Tal Peleg Transforms Her Eyelids Into Animals, Famous Paintings, And Emotional Messages

Foxy Eye

Foxy Eye

Girl With The Moon

Girl With The Moon

The Little Prince

The Little Prince

Salvador Dali

Salvador Dali

In a combination of makeup art and illustration, Israeli artist Tal Peleg has turned her eyelids into expressive canvases. Peruse her collection and you will see eyes and brow bones masterfully transformed into emotional landscapes, various animals, and renditions of famous paintings and movie scenes. Each piece is painstakingly achieved using a combination of eye shadows, watercolors, eyeliners, and tiny brushes, taking hours to perfect. The result is a series of artworks—ephemeral in nature—that express identity and creativity in unique ways.

“Makeup is an amazing form of art, and I use it in order to make my eye tell a story,” Peleg wrote on Bored Panda. “Inspiration is all around me, and I give my own unique artistic interpretation using makeup. It can be inspired by emotions, movies, fairytales, animals, food, important social matters, and more.” (Source)

The eye is the proverbial “window to the soul”—the lens through which our inner states become visible to others. It is incredible how the mood of Peleg’s ice-blue iris appears to shift depending on the artwork and narrative that surrounds it. As mentioned above, the topic range of Peleg’s eye-art is vast; some explore scenes of child-like innocence, while others convey important social messages, such as the pain and isolation of bullying, and the spiraling, dark coils of depression. With incredible detail and sensitivity, Peleg has captured these themes and experiences well, with her eye as the deep locus that communicates their significance on intuitive, emotional levels.

Visit Peleg’s Facebook and Instagram to see more. (Via deMilked)

Stephen Mattheu Booth


Stephen Mattheu Booth knows how to make a character worth remembering. I can’t say exactly what it is I enjoy about his characters, but they all just seem like they would be awesome to hang around with, and even his abstractions retain this figurative charm. I’ve always had an appreciation for this manner of art in which one can imagine the artist making these awesome drawings on a couch, or in bed, or at a bar, all without having to go to a studio and worshiping an easel, or using some computer tool to clean up his lines. It just feels right. And fortunately, he doesn’t draw fan artish mutated forms of Spongebob or Mickey Mouse, but instead, his work seems to sprout (growth being important here) from characters like Slimer, Donald Duck, Pluto, and other childhood favorites. How could you look at that #[email protected]*☁ duck and not smile?