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Li Hui

Li Hui, a conceptual artist born in the (a term which is often used here) post-70’s decade, creates a lot of his work with automobiles and “custom laser array, Laser Night Module, waterjet cutting machines, and laser engraving machines” in his arsenal. He’s even welded two front parts of a car together and turned yet another car into a pink sofa. Check out his video interview on The Creator’s Project.

And yes, I am alive and well in China!

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Living Legend and Founding Member of the Velvet Underground, John Cale

John Cale founded The Velvet Underground back in 1965 with Lou Reed and he’s been going strong ever since. The living legend turned 70 earlier this year and yes, he’s been making music for almost 50 years! His fifteenth solo album, Shifty Adventures In Nookie Wood came out this past October on Double Six Records to great reviews.

You can still get tickets for tonight’s last stop of his West Coast tour at the El Rey Theatre in Los Angeles with opener Cass McCombs via Ticketmaster. He also has three special performances in January, 2013 (A tribute to Nico and Paris 1919) at New York’s Brooklyn Academy of Music. Check out the video for Face to the Sky and do what you can to make it to one of these rare shows.

 

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Tim Lewis’ Mechanical Osterich Sculpture

 

British artist Tim Lewis’ Pony has an ostrich-like anatomy constructed from three mechanical arms, as athletically human as they are programmatically robotic. Like Jetsam, Pony appears as less animated object, more independent entity, moving across the floor towing an empty carriage, the ‘ostrich’ is autonomous rather than interactive. Born of mechanics in the same way that genetics engineers use science, Pony is a sculptural creature that is full of wonder with a creepy prehistoric robot feel. See more of Tim Lewis’ work after the jump.

Jonathan May Delves Into The Lives of Former Gang Members Who Have United Under Their Passion For Tattoo Art

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Jonathan May - Photography

Photographer Jonathan May reveals a poignant narrative of the lives of former Mexican gang members now united through a love of art and tattoos. This series, titled Desert Ink, explores a compelling story of eight men now leading honest lives away from the troubles of their past. Coming from a background filled with gangs, violence, drugs, and death, the men have set out for a new life to change their fate and future. Now living in Indio, California, these once criminals are bonded together in a different kind of brotherhood, one that is connected through their passion for tattoo art.

The men, Chip, Dreamer, Sinner, Lazz, Assault, Case 1, Angel, and G-Money, all began tattooing due to unforeseen circumstances. Those of them who spent time in prison began tattooing themselves and other fellow inmates. The others were also self-taught, creating homemade tattoo guns to pursue their newfound artistic talent. The eight of them, now working in their own shop, find redemption and purpose in focusing on something as positive and meaningful as tattoo art. It is a chance to make a permanent imprint on someone, almost literally. By rechanneling their efforts and talents into a constructive outlet, these men have found a shared talent that has united them for life. Jonathan May sheds a warm light on men who by no means have had it easy, but have found a way to change their lives for the better. (via FeatureShoot)

The Chaotic Darkness Of Tomohide Ikeya’s Waterlogged Photography

Tomohide Ikeya - Photographyunnamed (9) Tomohide Ikeya - Photographyunnamed (3)

Tomohide Ikeya is a Japanese photographer whose underwater nude portraits walk the line between serene beauty and the terror of death and drowning. In three series, titled Wave, Breath, and Moon, Ikeya explores the body interacting with the ocean in various ways: struggling on the shore, reaching for the surface, and surrendering to its darkness. The images are disturbing in a poetic way, depicting people expressing the primordial will to survive, while others curl up and quietly succumb, turning the surrounding water into a simultaneous womb and deathbed. Breath — that vital act — often goes unnoticed, but Ikeya’s work makes it visible in the form of bubbles, open mouths, and deathly stillness. “Perhaps the essence of life, granted to everyone, is to live while struggling against death,” Ikeya writes in his description of Breath. “Life is not just about visible beauty, but also about true strength, which we have from birth” (Source).

For Ikeya, the neutrality of water makes it the ideal medium in which to explore the rhythms of survival. Water gives life, and also extinguishes it. “Water is not the Mother of Creation or the Master of Destruction,” Ikeya states; it simply exists as an essential but unfeeling element (Source). By photographing the body in a physical struggle against water, Ikeya’s works are dark portraits of the value of life and the concurrence of death. The boundaries between unforgiving “nature” and the indestructible “human” are literally subsumed, washed away into emotional and physical gestures of life-defining resistance against — and fatal integration with — the ocean. The moment of struggle becomes the affirmation.

Visit Ikeya’s website and Facebook to see more of his work. (Via Juxtapoz)

Suehiro Maruo

FUNERAL PARTY - "DREAM OF EMBRYO", 1985.

FUNERAL PARTY - "DREAM OF EMBRYO", 1985.

The graphically sexual and violent nature of Suehiro Maruo’s illustrations has over the years catapulted him to stardom in the underbelly of Japanese art. There’s quite a few prominent blogs (Baby Art run by Trevor Brown, for example) that revolve around the genre which he is so big in: nightmarish manga (the Japanese term for comic books, meaning literally “whimsical pictures”) fall into the Japanese category of “erotic grotesque”. The stories often take place in the early years of Showa Era Japan. Maruo also has a fascination with human oddities, deformities, birth defects, and “circus freaks.”

Some of the images I’m posting here were from his collaborations with Japanese punk and hardcore records- many having to do with Fascist imagery that we at B/D in no way endorse! Nonetheless the artwork is beautiful. I especially love the line work and color juxtaposition in this cover he did for Funeral Party.

Pantone Café, Where You Can Devour A Delicious Palette For Your Palate

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Are you always in search of the perfect color palette? Well, Pantone Café has not only given you just that, but their brilliant hues are available now on a platter. Finally, food that is worth snapping a picture of! Now, the food you eat can match your mood or even your outfit. Each serving tray, cup, napkin, slushy, and food item has been matched with its Pantone color equivalent. Even the espresso machines hold incredible, eye-catching colors that are impossible to ignore. The menu at the Pantone Café is a masterpiece in itself, with the food and beverage choices being grouped in palettes that are to die for.

This minimalistic café provides an incredibly modern, aesthetically pleasing atmosphere down to the last napkin. Each colorful edible has its appropriate Pantone color name, with delicious hues such as pistachio green, canal blue, strawberry pink, and dazzling blue. Each meal contains such amazing color that it is almost too beautiful to eat. The café is a perfect little Pantone universe where color and design meets culinary beauty. This is a place where you can truly taste color and create delicious palettes for your own palate. This pop-up restaurant is located at the Grimaldi Forum and will be open only until September 9th. (via The Creators Project)

Claire Curneen Sculpts Tormented Porcelain Figures

Claire Curneen - Sculpture Claire Curneen - Sculpture Claire Curneen - Sculpture Claire Curneen - Sculpture Claire Curneen - Sculpture
Sculptor Claire Curneen works with everything from porcelain to terracotta, creating figurines that are cathartic and vaguely surreal. Her humanoid sculptures are faceless yet somehow expressive, posed in beseechingly though it would be up to interpretation just what they are looking for.
According to her artist’s statement, Curneen aims to “explore grand themes about the body and the human condition.” This sometimes manifests itself viscerally in her works where human bodies are pierced with thorns or otherwise immobilized. Other pieces are subtler, the figures lost in a shroud of apparent existential angst.
Curneen’s artist statement also says:
“Referencing Roman Catholic imagery and ideology and early Italian Renaissance paintings such as Piero Della Francesca’s ‘Baptism of Christ’, these figures bear bold narratives of saints, martyrs and rites of passage punctuated by often delicate yet dramatic totems to death, re-birth and the sublime.” (via Dark Silence in Suburbia)