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Ari Saarto’s IN SITU

Ari Saarto’s IN SITU documents the temporary structures and shelters that the homeless create. These primitive structures are reminders of how fragile life can be and highlights the instinctual need for man to have a place called home, regardless of how basic or unrefined it is.

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Best Of 2012: Jenine Shereos Human Hair Leaves

In Jenine Shereos’ series Leaf the intricacies of a leaf’s veining are recreated by wrapping, stitching, and knotting together strands of human hair.  Inspired by the delicate and detailed venation of a leaf, Shereos began stitching individual strands of hair by hand into a water- soluble backing material. At each point where one strand of hair intersected another, she stitched a tiny knot, so that when the backing was dissolved, the entire piece was able to hold its form.

The complex network of lines present in this work mimics the organic patterns found in nature and speaks to the natural systems of transformation, growth and decay. Allusions to the vascular tissue of plants, as well as the vascular system of the human body, exist simultaneously; the delicate trace of a hair falling silently, imperceptibly, from one’s head becoming the veins of a leaf as it falls from a tree leaving its indelible imprint on the ground below. (via oddity central )

Saddo

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Saddo is an insanely detailed illustrator from Berlin, Germany. He graduated from the University of Art and Design in Cluj Napoca, Romania, and currently specializes in bright, intricate, and surreal characters. His mediums include acrylic paint, watercolor, pencils, and marker pens while his canvas of choice is white paper, but  has been known to work on street surfaces and wood.

Terrifying Barbie Tidal Wave Composed Of 5,000 Dolls

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For the artist Annette Thas, Barbie is a disturbingly bittersweet symbol of childhood nostalgia and longing; for installation piece “Wave I,” she uses between 3,000 and 5,000 barbie dolls to build a sculptural wave, re-appropriating the doll as a means of translating her earliest memories, scenes which now flood her after returning to Belgium to care for her ill sister. Her sister’s illness, she explains, was related to the childhood they shared, one that was marked in part by the death of her brother.

For the artist, the wave is meant to convey her own relationship to overwhelming memories; it is 4 meters wide and stands at 3 meters tall, forcing viewers to be encased completely within its depths. The piece seems to swell with cascading blond hair, forever caught at the terrifying moment before its breaking. Adding to its realism, Thas chose to exhibit it on the beach as part of 2014’s Sculpture by the Sea amidst the sounds and smells of real waves.

The barbies in the piece, wild hair tangled and stripped of their clothing, do indeed seem ominous, but they are also startlingly sympathetic. They are second-hand toys, once loved but eventually discarded. They have endured a sort of violence, having been scarred by knives and bite marks. Each one has a poignant narrative all her own; one doll simply bears the words “please love me” on her chest. The plastic toys, symbolic of the scores of children who once owned them, are somehow lonesome now, robbed of childhood’s affections. Their demanding presence is urgent and desperate, their blue eyed faces pressing us to remember both the magical and painful bits of our youths. (via Design Boom)

Kristin Smith’s Photographs of Blurred-Out Bodies in Motion

 

Diggin’ on this Bodies of Thought photo series from San Francisco based artist and photographer Kristin Smith. The pictures deal with the concept of “an intelligent body, where the body’s thoughts are realized through movement.” Smith’s process removes any normal definition of personality from the figures and reveals, instead, a more ethereal consciousness that perhaps resides within us all. The works, blurred bodies full of motion set against black backgrounds, come off as very pure. Smiths models for the series (some of which, over the years, have been professional dancers) find a way, through Smith’s eye, to release a particularly distilled form of expression. “Intellect” is definitely present here, but not that of any worldly concerns. This series goes above (or below) the surface. (via)

Marina Abramovic The Artist Is Present

Image by: Scott Rudd
Image by: Scott Rudd

Marina Abramovic The Artist Is Present

Trailer – Marina Abramovic The Artist is Present from Show of Force on Vimeo.

Marina Abramović is one of the most compelling artists of our time. Seductive, fearless and outrageous, she has been redefining what art is for nearly forty years. Using her own body as a vehicle, pushing herself beyond her physical and mental limits, and at times risking her life in the process, Marina creates performances that challenge, shock and move us. Through her and with her, boundaries are crossed, consciousness expanded — and art as we know it is reborn.

The feature-length documentary film Marina Abramovic The Artist Is Present follows the artist as she prepares for what may be the most challenging performance of her life — a new piece that will be the highlight of a major retrospective of her work, taking place this spring at The Museum of Modern Art in New York.

To be given a retrospective at one of the world’s premiere museums is, for any living artist, the most exhilarating sort of milestone. For Marina, it is far more — it is the chance to finally silence the question she has been hearing over and over again for four decades: “But why is this art?” At 63, she has lost patience with being branded “alternative.” That designation, she says, just gives people license to rip her off. What she wants now is for performance art to be legitimated. She is thinking of her legacy — and the MOMA show, as she well knows, can secure it once and for all. “It is,” she says simply, “the most important [show] of my life.””

View some of our favorite videos and interviews with Marina Abramovic after the jump.

The Amazingly Expressive Origami Of Nguyen Hung Cuong

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Vietnamese paper artist Nguyễn Hùng Cường creates origami pieces in a style that is distinctively his own.  His pieces often begin with dó paper – a unique paper, made from the bark of the rhamnoneuron balansae, that is traditionally made throughout many of Vietnam’s villages.  Typically striving to create his work from only one sheet of paper, he has been known to often fold work from a single bill of Vietnamese money.  Nguyễn has been working in origami since he was just a small child creating his first original piece at ten years old.  [via]