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Made With Color Presents: Justin Waugh Breaks Down Painting

Justin Waugh painting

Justin Waugh painting

Justin Waugh painting

Beautiful/Decay has partnered with premiere website building platform Made With Color  to bring you exclusive artist features. Each week we join forces to bring you some of the most exciting artists and designers who use Made With Color to create their clean and sleek websites. Made With Color helps artists create gorgeous websites without any coding. This week we’re excited to bring you the work and website of Los Angeles painter Justin Waugh.

With a desire to break painting down to its fundemental components of color, line, form, and surface, Justin Waugh creates a restrictive set of criteria that has a rich dialogue with minimalism and post minimal abstraction.  Using those movements as a starting point, Waugh working to engage the language of  minimalism with a contemporary sensibility that is both familiar yet subversively fresh. Justin had this to say about this series:

“This series began as paintings that address the repetitive horizontal grid, a hallmark of minimalism, and the use of industrial materials. Instead of a consistent, mechanized application of paint there is evidence of a hand painted surface; the use of oil paint and graphite, traditional painting materials; and a bold use of color. As the series progressed I began working on handmade paper, further giving the work an organic quality that created an interesting tension with the rigidity of the pattern. I am also interested in the overall compositions being made up of repetitions of two inch bands of color, rendering them in a sense without focal point, and egalitarian in composition. I’m fascinated by the use of repeated forms and patterns, and how one can take a very simple gesture and scale it up into something greater than the sum of its parts. “

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Matthew Christopher Documents Forgotten Spaces In Abandoned America

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Ten years ago Philadelphia photographer Matthew Christopher began a photo series attempting to document the decline of the state hospital system. Today his evocative and beautiful collection, “Abandoned America”, includes images of asylums, institutions, military, hospitals/health care, prisons, schools, power plants, factories, mills, quarries, hotels, transportation, theaters, houses, churches, and graveyards. The photos are beautifully composed and shot and are totally captivating in their emptiness.

“There is an undeniably artistic element to decayed sites, and an immense number of social, theological, and philosophical questions they pose. Abandoned America’s aim encompasses not only the historical and photographic cataloging of such sites, but also on a larger scale a eulogy for the lost ways of life they represent, a statement of their emotional, spiritual, and metaphoric relevance to our everyday lives, and a sense of the visceral experience of entering a parallel universe of silence, rust, and peeling paint.”

The pictures of abandoned spaces seem to want to create a narrative. They ask questions: What is the difference between a place abandoned temporarily and permanently? Is it a matter of chance, of luck? When you walk out the door, are you certain that you’re coming back? What sort of artifacts does a person leave? There is a poignancy to these spaces, a haunted voyeurism, a solemn quality to their emptiness. What lives were being lived here, and why were they interrupted?

Christoper’s book, Abandoned America: The Age of Consequences, will be released on December 7th. He also posts updates on his Facebook page.

“There is something magical and mysterious about spaces that are no longer in use, where nature and time and man’s presence have combined to create something absolutely unique,” says Christopher. “I hope that people reading my book can experience that sense of the transcendental and sublime that I did when I photographed these forgotten places. This book is a chance to examine why we are losing so many sites that are critical to our identity and culture.”

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Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy’s Haunting Photoseries Erases Buildings, Leaving Only Their Facades

Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy

Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy

Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy

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Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy is a French photographer whose Facades series is a personal exercise in land and city-scape photography, with one major difference. In each photo, the Lyon-based Gaudrillot-Roy digitally edits each image so that building itself is erased, leaving only the structure’s front, or facade, present. Now on his third iteration of the series, each village or city building carries ominous, almost surreal connotations of civilizations being abandoned, wrecked by recession, or left to slowly disintegrate. However, the images retain a still, quiet beauty, and are haunting in their simplicity.

Says the photographer, “The façade is the first thing we see, it’s the surface of a building. It can be impressive, superficial or safe. Just like during a wandering through a foreign city, I walk through the streets with these questions: what will happen if we stick to that first vision? If the daily life of “The Other” was only a scenery? This series thus offers a vision of an unknown world that would only be a picture, without intimate space, with looks as the only refuge.” (via skumar’s)

Marcello Velho’s Graphic Kingdom

I’m really enjoying the bit mapped illustrations and designs of Marcello Velho A.K.A Kingdom. His stacked illustrations look like unexplored levels of 1980’s video games that one would play while taking massive amounts of acid.

Cod.Act’s Ingenious Choir Sings And Dances In The Air With The Help Of Hydraulic Jacks

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Cod.Act’s Pendulum Choir is an original choral piece for 9 A Cappella voices and 18 hydraulic jacks. The choir stands on tilting platforms, constituting a living, sonorous body. That body expresses itself through various physical states. Its plasticity varies at the mercy of its sonority. It varies between abstract sounds, repetitive sounds, and lyrical or narrative sounds. The bodies of the singers and their voices play with and against gravity. They brush and avoid each other creating subtle vocal polyphonies. Or, supported by electronic sounds, they break their cohesion and burst into lyrical flight or fold up into an obsessional and dark ritual. The organ travels from life to death in a robotic allegory where the technological complexity and the lyricism of the moving bodies combine into a work with Promethean accents. (via)

Samantha Wall’s Cathartic Look At Multiracial Identity Through Portraiture

 
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Indivisible is a series of graphite and charcoal portraits of multiracial women done by artist Samantha Wall. According to Wall, it is a study to understand her own dual ethnicity and capture subtle human expressions which transcend gender or race. By working with these women she was able to delve deeper into not only her own multiracial skin but also into others and in the process study the facial movement of each subject. To Wall, this was particularly important because as a multiracial person she related to the theories of Paul Eckmann who claimed that no matter what the background; financially, sexually, racially etc. certain human emotions could be universally understood through facial expression. However, at the time of her research, Wall was interested in emotions that could not be conveyed through facial gestures such as shame. Wall says as a child growing up in Korea and then the U.S. she felt a lot of shame which was a result from her mother’s set of Korean values.
The drawings in Indivisible are a cathartic look at women like Wall who may or may not have experienced the same feelings. It captures different emotions through subtle use of line and gesture bringing the essence of each person to the forefront. Part of Wall’s process was taking dozens of digital photographs of the women she met with, then studying those pictures to make her delicate yet powerful drawings. The end result is a sensitive look at these diversely beautiful women.  (via illusionscene360)

Kristian Jones’ Ghostly Silhouettes

British illustrator Kristian Jones’ delicately drawn ghostly silhouettes  prey on the innocence of childhood imagination, surreal worlds and fictional creatures.

Hijacked Billboards Used For Political Street Art

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The Billbored series of artist Dan Bergeron (also known as fauxreel)  undermines the all to common visual language of advertising.  His hijacked billboards, particularly his series featuring Carl the Plastic Baby, challenges passers-by to consider what they see more deeply.  Like much of his work, Billbored investigates identity, consumerism, and the places they intersect.   Carl the Plastic Baby, for example, playfully offers an an easy alternative to actual children.  A website accompanying the billboard offers visitors the opportunity to buy a “child” of their own – their very own Carl delivered to their home.