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Nina Berman Documents The Ferocity Of Consumption At Eating Contests

Blueberry pie,  Warwick NY

Erik Booker takes a breath from the Major League Chili Eating competition in Orlando Florida. The challenge was how many 32 oz bowls could a person eat in 6 minutes.   Joey Chestnut won with  8 and 3/4 bowls  -  2.125 gallons in 6 minutes

Blueberry pie,  Warwick NY

Coconut Cream Pie,  Queens, NY

Documentary photographer Nina Berman’s recent “Eat To Win” series is not for the faint hearted. Through her observation of eating competitions across the United States, she documents what she calls “the ferocity of consumption” and delves into the notions of frenzy and excess while depicting food as more than a necessary part of human survival. In these competitions, food becomes a source of competition, not in a necessary sense, but for entertainment. The series is comprised of close up of contestants, with their faces covered in food and savage expressions on their faces.

The competitions themselves unfold within 2 to 6 minutes, which underlines the way in which time is the most vital element of the competition. Berman’s photographs are interesting in the sense that she has chosen not to document the end result of the competition but the competition process in itself. This has resulted in a series full of intense facial expressions, a loss of manners and a visceral illustration of unbridled humanity.

Berman’s high definition close up allow you to step inside the world of eating competitions in an almost tangible manner, that brings you quite literally, face to face with the more disgusting side of being a human. She brings you into a high contrast world of overconsumption and excess and does not stray away from the greasy details. She places eating competitions at the junction of pleasure and pain, and by doing so establishes a subtle and somewhat humoristic critique of consumer society at its peak.

Photographs by Nina Berman/NOOR

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The Art Of Super Bowl Ticket Design

superbowl tickets

1973

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1968

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1967

Super Bowl ticket 1982

1982

The Super Bowl is perhaps the epitomy of America’s obsession with sports, television and mass entertainment, with a viewing audience of over a 100-million each year. Chad Langager at Sporting Charts notes the importance of the day, “There is so much attention paid to the game that 30-second commercials now command $4 million, which is equal to $133,333 per second, and Super Bowl half-time show now features some of the biggest acts in music. It has become a definite moment each year.”

But with each passing Bowl, perhaps one of the over-looked yetlasting memories is the art that each lucky ticket-holder carries with them. The Sacramento Bee took a trip through history yesterday by examining 48 Years of Super Bowl Tickets, documenting each ticket throughout the years for every season’s Big Game. While the iconic Lombardi Trophy is prominently featured on most tickets, several still offer sculptural, design-focused and painted images related to the grid-iron (though most of the artists responsible have become extremely hard to credit and some lost all together). It is an interesting look through the history of design, as well as to see the dated futuristic leanings often paired with athletic grandiosity on a massive stage. (via the sacramento bee)

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Kristofer Porter’s Bugged Out World

kristofer porter

The bug eyed, bizarre world of Kristofer Porter is one that I could stare at all day.

Karen Knorr’s Photographs of Sacred Indian Interiors Consider Caste, Femininity, And it’s Relationship To The Animal World

Karen knorr india song

Karen knorr india song

Karen knorr india song

Karen Knorr’s past work from the 1980’s onwards took as its theme the ideas of power that underlie cultural heritage, playfully challenging the underlying assumptions of fine art collections in academies and museums in Europe through photography and video. Since 2008 her work has taken a new turn and focused its gaze on the upper caste culture of the Rajput in India and its relationship to the “other” through the use of photography, video and performance. The photographic series considers men’s space (mardana) and women’s space (zanana) in Mughal and Rajput palace architecture, havelis and mausoleums through large format digital photography.

Karen Knorr celebrates the rich visual culture, the foundation myths and stories of northern India, focusing on Rajasthan and using sacred and secular sites to consider caste, femininity and its relationship to the animal world. Interiors are painstakingly photographed with a large format Sinar P3 analogue camera and scanned to very high resolution. Live animals are inserted into the architectural sites, fusing high resolution digital with analogue photography. Animals photographed in sanctuaries, zoos and cities inhabit palaces, mausoleums , temples and holy sites, interrogating Indian cultural heritage and rigid hierarchies. Cranes, zebus, langurs, tigers and elephants mutate from princely pets to avatars of past feminine historic characters, blurring boundaries between reality and illusion and reinventing the Panchatantra for the 21st century. (via)

David Szauder’s Finds Parallels Between Computer Glitches And Failed Human Memories

Digital Art

1 Digital Art

glitch art

David Szauder, a German digital artist, takes interest in the glitch phenomenon. Failed Memory, the name of the compilation of images, showcases photographs that are purposely altered. Precisely, the photograph’s flow is interrupted by the sudden ambiguity of lines and distortions occurring in certain parts of the subject’s body.

His ‘glitch’ technique literally translates to the themes he is working with here: memory and the possible failure to reconstruct them. Much like the files on our computer’s memory, human recollection of events might get distorted throughout time.

“Our brains store away images to retrieve them later, like files stored away on a hard drive. But when we go back and try to re-access those memories, we may find them to be corrupted in some way.”

His work is more than just visual; Szauder provides text to go along with the images. On his Behance profile, the artist expresses that the images recollect failed memories related to family moments. (via IGNANT)

World’s First 3D Printed Room

3D Printed Room 3D Printed Room 3

The fascinating possibilities of 3D printing are getting bigger, particularly with the unveiling of one of the most ambitious printed projects yet, the Baroque-by-way-of-Bitmapped sculpture titled Digital Grotesque. Conceived by architects Michael Hansmeyer and Benjamin Dillenburger, the duo claim their project is the world’s first 3D printed room. Computer algorithms designed most of the structure’s 260 million surfaces, which were printed in sections using a composite sand and binding agent to create a sandstone-like material. When each 4 meter tall, 1 meter wide and 3 meter deep sections were manually placed, the enclosure measures 16 feet and weighs a staggering 11 tons.

According to their website, the architects believe that “New materials and fabrication methods have historically led to radical changes in architectural design. They have indeed been the primary drivers in its evolution. Today, additive manufacturing heralds a revolution in fabrication for design. Yet in architecture, this technology has up to now been used only for small scale models. Digital Grotesque takes additive manufacturing technology to a true architectural scale. Not a small model is printed, but the actual room itself.”

Perhaps most compelling from an art perspective (or at least an art-historical perspective) is the logical conclusion the duo’s project makes. “The Digital Grotesque project opens the door to the printing of architecture. It suggests that 3D sandstone printing can be applied both to restoring historic buildings and to constructing new ones.” One can only imagine the possibilities that this technology will yield for museum research, archaeological recreation, and art exhibitions in the coming decades. (via oddly_even)

Mark Dutcher

Steve Turner Contemporary will be exhibiting Mark Dutcher’s works February 14th- March 21st in a show entitled, “Havilah.” Havilah is taken from the mountain community in Northern Kern County that has a rich mining history- once a city of abundance and big dreams, Halivah is now a sleepy ghost town off the beaten path. I like this concept. The works themselves don’t necessarily reflect the title directly, but I like them for their vibrant colors and controlled messyness- plus they use feathers!

Kim Dorland Paints Canadian Wasted Youth


Kim Dorland, Painter, Angell Gallery from Canadian Art on Vimeo.I’ve been seeing more and more of Kim’s work at various art fairs and group shows as of late. The videos intro is a tad cheesy but you get a fantastic inside view into Kim’s painting process, subject matter, and technique.