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Jennifer Mehigan’s ‘Armed/Luminous’ series

Jennifer Mehigan‘s  Armed/Luminous series (2010) mixes paint with found imagery to explore the hidden beauty of fire. The Sydney-based artist’s use of bright brushstrokes undermines the scenes of terror behind by destroying the image  in both material and metaphorical terms, with a clear parallel to Gerhard Richter‘s Overpainted series.

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Troels Carlsen’s Vivisection And Torture

Copenhagen based Troels Carlsen has some beautifully brutal work dealing with imagery of death, torture, and vivisection.

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Artist Carves Life-Size Skull Out Of A Rare 4 Million Year Old Meteorite

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The first life size skull hand made from a rare crystallized meteorite ‘Gibeon’. This unique piece has been realized by Lee Downey; an American jeweler artist, whose purpose is the celebrate the mystery of the human skull and its numerous symbols and interpretations. The astonishing piece will be auctioned by Bonhams on November 24th 2015 and has already been estimated at around $400,000.

The process started out by cutting and carving down a block of meteorite (617 lbs) into a 46 lbs skull. The precious artifact is called ‘Gibeon’. A meteorite of 4 million years old, dating from the prehistorical era and founded in the Namibia region. The coveted material is renowned for his crystal structure and its singular ‘Widmanstätten’ pattern. A motif unveiling  a repetition of matte and glossy stripes imitating metal.
The intricate work of polishing and washing the carved skull revealed an unexpected insertion on its forehead classified as ‘Tridymite’, a rare component.

Lee Downey, now residing in Bali, through his work, has brought out never seen before features on the texture of this particular meteorite. The reflection of the light onto the multi-faceted inclusions creates a shimmery luxurious aspect. The fact that the surface, including the gold insertion, is pure; confers to the skull an exceptional uncommon value. “Of any material I could think of to fashion an accurate human skull out of, this Gibeon meteorite best embodies the “mystery” most acutely. I call him The Traveler… a true time traveler”. The artist’s intention in presenting the symbol of death with an ageless, immortal material is to focus on spiritual consciousness and the definition of eternity.

Lee Downey’s meteorite skull will be auctioned at Bonhams on November 24th 2015.

The Unsettling Women of Troy Brooks’ Paintings

Painter Troy Brooks creates curious and unsettling canvases.  Painting in a Pop surrealist style, Brooks depicts scenes where something terribly strange has just occurred or is about to unfold.  Each piece is dominated by a female figure, all similar in appearance but clearly different in personality – some bored, some subversive, other outright violent.  Brooks makes use of a sort of symbolism transforming each setting into an allegorical scene.

Micaela Lattanzio’s Photo Mosaics Shatter Portraits Into Bits And Pieces

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Micaela Lattanzio creates works of art that go beyond the traditional forms of photography. This collection, called “Frammentazioni,” shatters photos into bits and pieces, enabling Lattanzio to play with space and texture. Her mosaic-esque pieces contain a sort of kinetic energy, suggesting form and movement in a subtle way.

Like other types of art that use human features, it’s hard not to assign emotion to Lattanzio’s work. She literally uses human images as jig saw pieces, evoking a sort of psychological depth that could be read as anxious or even playful.

Some of Lattanzio’s works are use the various pieces of photographs as pixels, rearranging them around each other but maintaining some semblance of the original shape. Other pieces lace together long stripes, looking like the result of two inkjet printers communing  (via Hi-Fructose)

“Gluten Free Museum” Imagines Art History Without The Grain

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For many people, eating gluten-free is a way of life. But, what happens when you not only remove wheat products from your diet, but from art history, too? The amusing Tumblr called Gluten Free Museum shows us just what that’d look like. It strips the offending protein from paintings, advertisements, and Chief Wiggum’s hands.

There’s a “before” and “after” element to each Gluten Free Museum post. The before, of course, is the original artwork, and the after is it sans grain. You don’t necessarily realize how integral gluten is in artistic compositions throughout history. Suddenly, though, things look bare. There’s no bread on the table, and the peasants are just picking at the ground without purpose. It demonstrates just how large of a role gluten plays in the art world, and sometimes, it’s at the center of it.

Joseph Leroux

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Joseph Leroux uses various materials (metal, paper, wire, found objects, etc) to create creepy looking sculpture and installations full of symbolism. Check out his series on body parts merged with machinery/ metal works.

Pavel Maria Smejkal’s Famous Photographs Devoid Of Main Subjects

Pavel Maria Smejkal lives and works in Slovakia. From 2009 to 2011 he created a series entitled Fatescapes in which the main subjects are removed from famous photographs and iconic images. What remains is the often eerie landscape in which the event unfolded. From Raising The Flag on Iwo Jima to Muhammad Ali vs. Sonny Liston, these strange images are inherently important and memorable even though the central focus has shifted. In his own words: “In Fatescapes, I remove (using a classic tool of digital work today Adobe Photoshop) the central motifs from historical documentary photographs and the main subject of these motifs, human bodies. I use images that have become our cultural heritage, constitute the memory of nations, serve as symbols or tools of propaganda, and exemplify a specific approach to photography as a document of the historical moment. I explore their purpose and function, and I ask about the future of this magic medium, and about human existence. Aware that their authenticity is not unquestionable, I return to these key images after they have been reinterpreted numerous times from various perspectives, and by manipulating their content I explore their purpose, function, and future.” (via)