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Peggy Kouroumalos

Peggy Kouroumalos


Peggy Kouroumalos, a Scorpio from Canada, has a penchant for painting people (mostly women) in quite unique surroundings and circumstances. In her “Animal Head” series, Peggy has oil painted these women with animals for hair. It takes one a second to comprehend what they are looking at, for of course we are all going to look at the woman’s body before we glance at her raccoon-hair. It’s interesting we should post this today, as our stoic intern Harrison has decided to wear his very own raccoon-hat to work today.



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Fabian Oefner’s Spirals of Flying Paint

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Artist Fabian Oefner has a strange way of painting.  For this series a rod is covered in various colors of acrylic paint.  The rods is connected to an electric drill which in turn is connected to a sensor that activates a camera flash lasting only 1/40,000 of a second.  The moment the paint begins to be flung in all directions off the rod (according to Oefner, one millisecond, to be exact, after the rod begins spinning) is caught by the carefully timed flash.  An instantaneous hurricane of color is frozen in midair capturing a structure that only exists for a fraction of a second.  [via]

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Sébastien Lifshitz Documents Hidden LGBT Relationships From The Early 20th Century

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Filmmaker Sébastien Lifshitz began compiling vintage photographs of queer couples when he happened upon a photo album that he realized contained the life a lesbian couple. Intrigued by the visibility with which they claimed with these photographs, despite living in the early to mid 20th century, when homosexuality was less accepted and more hidden that it is now, Lifshitz filmed a documentary – Les Invisibles (2012) – chronicling the lives of LGBT couples born between the two World Wars. Lifshitz just released a companion photo book –The Invisibles: Vintage Portraits of Love and Pride – last month. These images capture a lifestyle that was largely invisible to the mainstream culture to which it belonged. Photography was a way for queer communities to be visible to each other and to document the lives they led, however invisible they were to the heteronormative culture of their time.

Of his collection, Lifshitz says, “I don’t know these people — they are anonymous to me. I can’t really even say that each person photographed into the book is gay, except when it’s obvious. What I like is that there are different levels of reading these photos — I would say three levels to be exact. The first one is the pictures of obviously gay single people or couples, the second is the pictures of people which can be seen as ‘undefined’ (we’re not sure) and the third level is the ones that are obviously not gay but playing with a gay attitude (cross-dresser, some ‘garçonnes,’ etc.). I love the ambiguity and diversity of these pictures. These photographs ask questions. I didn’t caption the photos because I don’t know quite anything about each of them (no name, no location mentioned most of the time). I wanted to expose them like the way I found them: without any information, like mysterious pictures.” (via brain pickings)

Fernando Rodriguez

Fernando Rodriguez You Hurt MeCan somebody say juicy?  Fernando Rodriguez has some sizzling designs.  Can you see the hidden message in the above image? I’ll give you 5 seconds. Give up? “You Hurt Me”… Oh, but it hurts so good.  I am loving this clean deliciousness coming out of Spain. 

B/D Shop: 19 New Artist Prints!

Just in time for the holidays B/D present 19 brand new prints designed exclusively for B/D by some of your favorite artists from around the world. Each high quality print is printed on thick archival paper with the boldest inks for maximum color and resolution. Add a few prints to your collection today and make those bare walls disappear this holiday season!


Sawatari’s vision of Lewis Carroll’s “Alice in Wonderland” is truly one of the strangest, most out-there interpretations of the well-known story. Risqué in terms of its frank, nude depiction of a youthful Alice, the book’s unintentionally psychedelic tone brings to mind Monty Python, Peter Greenaway, and Vogue Bambini.