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Jonathan Monaghan’s Dauphin 007

 

Jonathan Monaghan updates us with his latest surreal story about a lion losing his crown and more importantly his head. Watch the full video after the jump.

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We Are In The Age of Wizards


One year in 40 seconds from Eirik Solheim on Vimeo.One year in 40 seconds from Eirik Solheim on Vimeo.

The fact that the minds eye can watch in rapid succession a forest turn from barren winterland to the growth of spring clearly means we have become Gods of The Earth. Anyways, happy New Year’s Eve! Watch the year pass in ways only Sorcerers have known.

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B/D LA Movietime This Wednesday!

Make sure to come early to grab a seat as this event will fill up!

 

The Marc Jacobs & Louis Vuitton documentary kicks off a month long series of free outdoor screenings at Space 15 Twenty, hosted by Beautiful/Decay Magazine.

 

The screenings are projected on the large outdoor screen located next to the Snack Bar. Seating is limited so arrive early to secure a chair, but if you get there late, no worries you can always sit on the floor or bring your own chair!

 

We kick off with Loic Prigent’s behind-the-scenes documentary, “Marc Jacobs & Louis Vuitton” (2007) delving into Marc Jacobs’ busy creative life, and featuring appearances by Victoria Beckham, Uma Thurman, Demi Moore and Sofia Coppola and other fashion-forward Hollywood starlets. This documentary is not to be missed if you are a fan of fashion.

 

Drinks, Snacks and Popcorn are available at SnackBar.

 

 

Marc Jacobs & Louis Vuitton – Wednesday May 6th
8:00pm
Space 15twenty
1520 N. Cahuenga Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90028

Pavlos Tsakonas’s Technicolor Trompe-L’œil

Pavlos Tsakonas creates hyperrealistic trompe-l’oeil paintings that confuse and delight the eye all at once. Each piece is a technical marvel with real shadows juxtaposed next to artificial ones to create a 4th dimension of creative awesomeness!

Jennifer Garza-Cuen’s Haunting Photographs Capture The Ghostly Dreamland Of Reno

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In her series Reno, a component of her larger project, Wandering In Place, Jennifer Garza-Cuen captures a hidden America. Through images of abandoned theaters, plastic covered casinos, dust collecting disco balls, women bound to decks of cards, and quiet, empty, almost pallid landscapes, she is able to inherently provoke an aura of nostalgia. She describes the work as a “metaphorical memoir,”  pulling at the strings of what “the American dream” truly means and looks like. In a country formulated through vast histories, how does a cultural identity extensively exist? What does it mean to be an American? Her work captures a more subtle, yet convoluted portrait of identity, proving that the American identity is innately faceless and multifaceted.

Her photographs confuse cultural memory, bringing us back in time, despite depicting the present. In what she refers to as a “constructed-documentary style,” she dances around the idea of documentation versus constructed narrative, blurring the line between fact and fiction. She brings us into a dreamland where it seems time has stopped. Her photographs capture moments of silent contemplation. They are almost cinematic period pieces. Perhaps, stills of the scene directly following a climax. Her photographs are not clear portrayals of darkness nor light; they provoke the viewer to search for an almost Lynchian meaning. She displays moments of what may be misfortune, missed opportunity, or confusion. She allows a sense of yearning and misunderstanding, getting at the very ethos of Reno. She states:

“Reno is a place that embodies ideas of Western idealism, the frontier spirit, of transience and the gambler’s impulse to risk everything for the chance at a better life. It was founded as a toll, a passage across the Truckee River, and on silver from the Comstock Lode. In Reno I attempt to come to terms with the defining force of place while returning to my own experience of being a wanderer, a state that obscures identity and embodies what it means to exist outside the codified order of the defined.”

 

Emma Howell’s Hand-Made Camera Prints Photographs Onto Glass

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In the age of digital photography and Instagram filters that make things look fakely old, glass artist and photographer Emma Howell uses a technique that is opposite of the easy, fast-paced methods popular today. Not only does she go to painstaking lengths to print an image, but she uses the unconventional surface of glass. Howell crafts hand-blown vessels and prints landscape images on them using the technique of the wet plate collodion – a photographic process that predates the Civil War. The result is a subtle and moody piece that’s a conversation between photography and form. She tells Wired Magazine, “Most people are not able to experience a place that is unaffected by the human presence. So I’m creating a way for others to experience this in a way that’s more than looking at a flat print of the cliché beach we all see and know.” The shape of the glass informs what the image is. A ripple or imperfection is meant to echo waves in the landscapes.

Howell’s pieces are irregularly shaped, so she had to build her own camera to accommodate them. She studied how large format cameras were constructed and sawed a barrel in half to act as the camera’s body. Afterwards, she fashioned a mount that allowed her to attach a traditional lens to the barrel. After six weeks of trial and error, she had a working design and began shooting.

The process of transferring an image to glass is very involved. Howell hikes to remote areas with a miniature chemistry lab and darkroom in tow, working on the fly to mix up photosensitive chemicals, coat glass, expose shots, and develop the image – all in the span of 15 minutes.(Via Wired)

New Music: Dog Bite Premieres Single and Readies Debut LP, Velvet Changes

Photo by Katherine Cooper

Washed Out keyboardist Phil Jones’ Dog Bite is about to release their debut LP, Velvet Changes on Carpark Records on Feb. 5th. Paste Magazine recently premiered the second single Forever, Until and I’ve been playing it non-stop since I first heard it. If you like your dream-pop and 90’s lush sounds like I do, you’ll love what Dog Bite is doing.

Dog Bite will be heading out on the road with Toro Y Moi starting on January 30th at the Crescent Ballroom in Phoenix, AZ and ending on March 3rd at the Fonda Theatre in Los Angeles with a ton of dates in between. Definitely check out the new song and grab some tickets to an upcoming show via Ticketmaster.

Caroline Larsen’s Painted Needle Point

These may look like your grandma’s needle point but they are in fact made entirely out of paint! Mixing a pixilated kind of neo-impressionist pointillism with the idea of textile weaving, Caroline Larsen‘s paintings are beautifully simple and yet hard to figure out. Her technique with oil paint is so expertly peculiar her viewer can be tempted to spend their time simply trying to figure out how she does it; this however, is a mistake, because her technique, impressive as it is, is fused to her subject matter in an inseparable way. Although her work balances formal interests with subjective ones, she invests fully in her imagery, culling series from her lived experience and most tenacious memories. Her current exhibition at Angell Gallery, P.A.N.A.M.A. R.E.N.A., records a strange and
menacing number of massive cargo ships, seen by the artist on her travels, notably in the Panama Canal. Reduced by her painting to pattern, surface and color but sacrificing little in terms of ability to reference the world (with all of its implications of economic and
environmental issues), these works are finally, simply of transportation machines hugely beyond our human scale. What they are about is the way those things affect us when we confront them.