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Satoshi Araki Obsessive Dioramas Of Destruction And Decay

Satoshi Araki - Miniature Model Satoshi Araki - Miniature Model Satoshi Araki - Miniature Model Satoshi Araki - Miniature Model

Following on from the trend of “Ruin Porn” or “Ruin Photography“, Japanese artist Satoshi Araki intricately creates miniature dioramas of bombed out cities or urban landscapes. He is attracted to anything that is in a state of decay. He is especially adept at reconstructing tiny details he finds through using Google Image Search. For example he searches for particular phrases (“Iraq war” or “Iraq ruins”) and meticulously recreates what he finds.

Obviously Araki has a sharp eye for details. Using knives and blades to scrape off paint and to add rust, he achieves realistic imperfections, turning a normal miniature scooter into a thing of amazement. He even adds cans with miniscule Arabic writing on them, tucked inside a box in one of his destroyed scenes of Baghdad. He makes sure to carefully smash the tiny windshield of a car, denting it in all the right places, and even adding a bent license plate all to create a believable environment. For such scenes full of violence and horror, he surely makes them a thing of beauty and wonder.

There is a strong sense of poetry in Araki’s work. He focuses on the destruction of man made buildings and objects – mainly being overtaken by nature. Trees grow over old rusted cars; grass forces it’s way through rotting rubber tires. And this is the fascination that other Ruin Porn artists have as well. They all capture the beauty of the world we have created around us crumbling to the ground. And just like Araki, they find joy in that chaos. They celebrate the beauty of the piles of rubble we live in.

You can marvel at more of his amazing work here and here.
(Via Spoon Tamago)

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Canan Cengel

It’s pretty fun discovering the fetus shapes in each of these sangria colored pieces of wrinkled fabric. I know, that probably sounds weird but Canan Cengel really deserves all praises for her eye on detail, creating the perfect positioning and shadowing for her aptly titled project: f. Check the rest below.

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B/D Apparel Artist Interview: Jiro Bevis

Jiro Bevis

To celebrate the release of B/D Apparel’s new Spring collection, we are featuring a 5-part interview series, giving you a behind-the-scenes look at each of the artists who create our graphics. Within these interviews, we explore their creative process, tools of the trade, influences, and their advice for fellow creatives.

For the first interview in the series, we caught up with Jiro Bevis, who collaborated with us to create “B/D Breakfast Club” and “Thumbs Up”. Jiro’s work interweaves iconic pop cultural references and inside jokes alike, resulting in a bold mix of idiosyncratic images, united by Bevis’ humorous approach.

Read the full interview after the jump!

Pieter ten Hoopen’s Photographs Of Exotic Lands In Turmoil Are Raw And Powerful

Pieter ten Hoopen- Photograph Pieter ten Hoopen- PhotographPieter ten Hoopen- PhotographPieter ten Hoopen- Photograph

Swedish photographer Pieter ten Hoopen has worked within all aspects of photography, from journalism to commercial. At this point in his career he is a well known and distinguished photographer: he has received many prestigious awards, amongst them the Photographer of the Year in Sweden, and the World Press Award; he has published books of photography on Tokyo and Stockholm, and is currently working on a film project about Hungry Horse, Montana, through MediaStorm.

Ten Hoopen shoots mainly on a Nikon but also uses Yashica box cameras and a Widelux. He has worked all over the world, and travels out of known safety to deliver raw and emotionally jarring footage from places far away, many in turmoil. In the past, he has worked in Pakistan, composing images from the aftermath of the 2005 earthquake, an intimate glimpse into the pain and hardship as families continued digging through rubble in search of buried survivors. He shot the small village Vladimirskoe, Russia, which, lying next to the mythically invisible town of Kitezh, occupies a strange grey area of being juxtaposed next to a national attraction while being invisible and struggling itself; problems with alcohol and unemployment make life difficult for most of its inhabitants. In Japan, ten Hoopen visited a forest that lies below Mount Fuji, known informally as the “suicide forest,” where, yearly, nearly a hundred people travel there to commit suicide. The forest is dense with vegetation and stands on the remains of a volcanic eruption, making compasses completely useless and getting lost in the woods very easy. People tie ropes to trees to prevent themselves from getting lost, and many go in there with the intention of never coming out.

There is a stillness in his images, the composition forms its own poetry, and the emotional charge of the situations he encounters stand squarely in the frame. Within the same vein of documentary photography as Sebastião Salgado, ten Hoopen brings an unprovoked sense of art to the frame; providing a visual means with which we can connect to these feelings as viewers, even halfway across the globe, even never having stepped out of our own country. That is the most powerful aspect of this kind of a photographer, he gives voice to what he witnesses, and brings forth the unexplainable beauty and devastation that words cannot do justice to.

Made With Color Presents: Justin Waugh Breaks Down Painting

Justin Waugh painting

Justin Waugh painting

Justin Waugh painting

Beautiful/Decay has partnered with premiere website building platform Made With Color  to bring you exclusive artist features. Each week we join forces to bring you some of the most exciting artists and designers who use Made With Color to create their clean and sleek websites. Made With Color helps artists create gorgeous websites without any coding. This week we’re excited to bring you the work and website of Los Angeles painter Justin Waugh.

With a desire to break painting down to its fundemental components of color, line, form, and surface, Justin Waugh creates a restrictive set of criteria that has a rich dialogue with minimalism and post minimal abstraction.  Using those movements as a starting point, Waugh working to engage the language of  minimalism with a contemporary sensibility that is both familiar yet subversively fresh. Justin had this to say about this series:

“This series began as paintings that address the repetitive horizontal grid, a hallmark of minimalism, and the use of industrial materials. Instead of a consistent, mechanized application of paint there is evidence of a hand painted surface; the use of oil paint and graphite, traditional painting materials; and a bold use of color. As the series progressed I began working on handmade paper, further giving the work an organic quality that created an interesting tension with the rigidity of the pattern. I am also interested in the overall compositions being made up of repetitions of two inch bands of color, rendering them in a sense without focal point, and egalitarian in composition. I’m fascinated by the use of repeated forms and patterns, and how one can take a very simple gesture and scale it up into something greater than the sum of its parts. “

Josh Keyes Solo Exhibition: “Sprout”

Josh Keyes, Entangle I

 

Josh Keyes‘s new solo exhibition, Sprout, will be on display at the David B. Smith Gallery (located at 825 Santa Fe Drive), beginning May 30th through July 3rd. Presenting a series of new paintings with a focus on the theme of overgrowth, Sprout delves into Keyes’s vocabulary of imagery, intertwining animals and objects to create a simultaneously mysterious and unsettling juxtaposition between the natural and the manmade landscape. Keyes’s body of work conveys anxious and realistic visions of a possible future due to current global warming predictions. 

 

Street Artist No Touching Ground Depicts Social Conflict In Greece, US, And Worldwide

No Touching Ground- Street Art No Touching Ground- Street Art No Touching Ground- Street Art No Touching Ground- Street Art

Traveling all over the world, street artist No Touching Ground wheat pastes compelling imagery amidst various cities architecture that adds depth to the context of our time and place. Recently, in Greece, he posted work concerning their social political climate under the title “Ingredients Of An Uprising”. In one of them, an Axe body spray bottle, re-worked to say “Anarchy for Him” floats over other graffiti on a busy street.

No Touching Ground creates a nearly optical illusion as his work is so photorealistic that it blends into its surroundings in an uncanny way. He began by working around images of animals from the wild, and people dressed up like animals. His work has since become more political, ranging from symbolic elements indicative of social tensions, to portraits and quotes of protestors met at a demonstration. In Seattle he voiced many of the emotions surrounding the tragic death of John T. Williams at the hand of a Seattle police officer. His work is aesthetically lush and important for our social consciousness.

A rather mysterious artist, No Touching Ground has work all over the world. Alaska, Seattle, South America, Europe, and now Greece, there is no saying where his work will show up next.

Bodies Projecting the Milky Way from Mihoko Ogaki

Mihoko Ogaki sculpture2 Mihoko Ogaki sculpture3

Mihoko Ogaki sculpture1

The sculptures of Mihoko Ogaki are deeply felt.  Her sculptures often deal with the heavy ideas of life and death.  This series titled Milky Ways follows suit.  Plastic sculptures of people inhabit darkened rooms.  Lit from within, the bodies illuminate the surrounding walls and ceiling with a starry-like pattern.  Each body carries a universe within it, projecting it out onto the world around it – it isn’t difficult to draw out a metaphor from there.  It is further interesting to contrast the dark unlit plastic bodies in the well lit gallery against the glowing beings alone in the middle of the dark room.  [via]