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Jonathan Collin Trousseau

jonathan collin trousseauJonathan Collin Trousseau currently reside in “No Culture,” California (otherwise known as Sacramento). Luckily for him, Jonathan will be moving to Chicago, IL in six weeks were he plans to attend the Art Institute of Chicago. keep it up!

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Rik Garrett Transforms Two Bodies into One

Artist Rik Garrett explores physical relationships in his series Symbiosis.  By painting directly onto the photograph, Garrett literally fuses two bodies into one.  Two writhing bodies seem to become one organism.  It’s a nearly a literal interpretation of “two becoming one flesh”.

Garrett says, “Symbiosis is a new series exploring ideas regarding love, relationships, magic, Alchemy and mutually beneficial partnerships in nature.”

While the idea sounds romantic the imagery can appear otherwise.  The single masses almost appear to be struggling against itself, perhaps alluding to the complexities of sexuality and relationships.

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Valentin Ruhry’s Quietly Stunning Installation, ‘Réclamer’

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Austrian artist Valentin Ruhry often plays with ideas of Minimalism and analog technologies, using light installations as a systematic approach which reveals a metaphor of interconnectedness, even when we do not see them present. In his 2013 exhibition Réclamer at Halle für Kunst & Medien in Graz, (then travelling to Österreich), Ruhry references advertising and promotional communication, using light boxes which generally house these messages. The exhibition’s title, Réclamer, comes from Latin and French, meaning to claim, to appeal, to call back. Ruhry, who was born in Graz, Austria and now lives and works in Vienna, used the empty light to represent a loss of function, “both through their components and in and of themselves.”

This type of installation investigates many of the themes present in Ruhry’s other works. When speaking with Jon Rathenberg’s Artist Interview Tumblr, Ruhry explains his fascination and his process, “I´m not a scientist nor have I ever been educated in mechanical engineering or whatever but I have always had a strong interest in technology. For me, a jet plane or a refrigerator is as fascinating and sometimes as miraculous as the power socket on your wall. Since I don’t understand much about the technical aspects of most of the equipment that surrounds me I study there aesthetic qualities. I try to highlight them by placing aesthetics or form before function.” (via likeafieldmouse and artistinterview)

Zack Seckler’s Humorous Photography

Zack Seckler

Zack Seckler photography

Zack Seckler photographs

Photographer Zack Seckler‘s “Humor” series captures moments of absurdity and whimsy with a subtle aesthetic. His muted color palette and compositions often feature a single figure placed within a humorous context. The effect of the humor is subtle partly because of the color palette and also because it’s often just a small detail that catalyzes the humorous story in each photograph – one that is up to the viewer to interpret. Most of his photographs are composed of absurd juxtapositions and placements, recontextualizing activities or objects in order to point out some aspect of absurdity.

Seckler says, “People view life through their own lens. I enjoy refocusing that lens and playing with our expectations of the world. By putting an uncommon twist on common experiences, I create images that inspire humor and imagination. With that, I hope to expand each person’s view -– for at least a moment.”

Seckler lives in New York City.

You Were In My Dream

You Were in My Dream is a incredibly interactive installation where the viewer becomes part of the story. It takes a live video feed of your face, and incorporates it into the installation. Created in collaboration by Isobel Knowles and Van Sowerwine.

Jeff Muhs Paints Slipstream Sunsets Of Color

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Painter Jeff Muhs‘ latest series “Slipstream” features bright smears of color birthed from newsprint chaos. According to a press release, the series tries to bring the viewer to a “crossroad of intention and chance, where color and motion are freed from an objective context and becomes the subject itself.” The result is what feels almost like a vortex of hues that is floating in space, devoid of any real world shape or form.
According to Muhs’s biography, he draws much of his inspiration from the natural world. This influence is clear in the jewel-toned colors he uses and the organic way he allows the shapes to emerge from the background. Though there isn’t anything fabulously new about Muhs’s art, there is a meditative quality to it that makes you pause and take a moment to simply appreciate the colors of his work, much as you might do for a sunset. (via Dark Silence in Suburbia)

New Solo Exhibit by Johnston Foster

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Sculpture artist Johnston Foster’s new exhibit,  Catch & Release, opens next Saturday, May 15th, at New York’s RARE gallery. Foster, whom we featured in Beautiful/Decay Issue Y, has always created incredible somethings from the populace’s discarded nothings, but in his new show Foster also focuses on creation as his subject matter. There’s a little something for everyone in Johnston Foster’s new show: sharks, tigers, hornets, unicorns and of course a pizza pie –  masterfully sculpted from a myriad of materials: pvc, bicycle spokes, marbles and a kiddie pool, to name a few.

The show opens on Saturday May 15th with a reception from 6-8pm and runs through June 19th.

David Lynch’s Factory Photography Is As Surreal As His Films

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If you’re familiar with the films of David Lynch, then you know the subtle uneasiness that he makes you feel. It doesn’t just stop with movies, as Lynch is also a photographer.  Between 1980 and 2000, he shot monochromatic images of factories in Berlin, Poland, New York, New Jersey, and England. The result is a book of photographs titled The Factory Photographs, selections of which are currently on view  at The Photographers’ Gallery in London.

It’s clear that the filmmaker’s eye transfers effortlessly between the moving picture and a static one.  These landscapes are beautiful, but desolate and haunting; Their moodiness makes them feel as if they are of a different time and dystopian future. “I love industry. Pipes. I love fluid and smoke. I love man-made things. I like to see people hard at work, and I like to see sludge and man-made waste,” Lynch writes in his book.

The photographer practices transcendental meditation, and his penchant for delving into the strange and unconscious part of ourselves is not lost on these photographs. In the exhibit’s press release, Lynch says, “I just like going into strange worlds. A lot more happens when you open yourself up to the work and let yourself act and react to it.” These provocative images invite us to do the same. (Via Fast Company)