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Adam W. Hill’s Amusing Portraits Of People As Dolls

Adam W. Hill - PhotographyAdam W. Hill - Photography Adam W. Hill - Photography Adam W. Hill - Photography

Adam W. Hill is a photographer whose work centers on the creation of alternative portraiture. This particular series, titled Dollface, explores the effect of doll-like makeup on people of various ages; with heavily rouged cheeks, thick eyebrows, and contoured lips, his subjects are a magnetic (and eerie) combination of adulthood and infancy. Hill has done an excellent job highlighting the brightness and color of their eyes, giving life and vibrancy to an artificial aesthetic. It is fascinating, too, how the models have chosen to express their doll-identities; some look passive and innocent, others playful and mischievous, the rest serious or melancholic.

Peruse Adam’s website, and you’ll see that all of his series explore portraiture in an unconventional way; his subjects are youthful, playful, and sometimes a bit absurd. In his portfolio’s “About Me,” he expresses his views on the historical significance of the portrait, stating how it has traditionally been used “for people of privilege and power, and as a means of affirming the authority of certain individuals” (Source). While he resists this sort of elitist representation, he is also fascinated by the aesthetics of formal portraiture; as a result, his work displays alternative subjects in a quasi-traditional way by infusing them with an appearance of “power and privilege, […] decadence and despair” (Source).

Dollface is an amusing and fascinating example of Adam’s manipulation of photographic tradition. By posing his models in conventional ways, but dressing them with hyperbolic, doll-like makeup, he “plays” with and subverts the elitism behind formal portraiture, thereby producing a commentary on the artificiality of the genre. Check out Adam’s website for more examples of his work.

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Michelle Reader

Wings

London based artist Michelle Reader‘s work is influenced by environmental concerns, in particular the over consumption of resources.  Much of her sculptures are commissioned to promote the reuse and recycling of trash Reader also creates props, like the image above, for theater, events, and photo shoots.

Sponsored Video: Ask The Right Questions, Change The World

if we contest if we contest

 

We all want to change the world to make it a better place. That’s why last summer Dassault Systemes asked over 550 thinkers from around the world for submissions of world changing dreams as part of their “If We” contest. Pulled from various social networking venues such as Twitter, Facebook, 3ds.com and an assortment of blogs they received brilliant ideas from every corner of the globe proving that progress and innovation can happen if we simply look and ask for it. From the initial pool of submissions they gathered the top 85 ideas and contacted the authors to get more details about their dreams.The above video sponsored by Dassault is a compilation of the top 10 ideas pulled from those 85 contestants. With so many brilliant, quirky and out of the box ideas it’s hard to choose favorites but one that particularly jumped out at us comes from Geoffrey Cooper from Canada: “IF WE designed a rolling tree planting robot, we could send them out to replant forests and restore deserted lands. Let’s make it happen!”

Join in on the conversation and share your ideas with the world today!

Tiffany Sum

"Lake Intervention", 2007/2008. Sound installation/ 30" x 24" Digital C-Print. Collaboration with Samuel Ekwurtzel.  

 

 

"Lake Intervention", 2007/2008. Sound installation/ 30" x 24" Digital C-Print. Collaboration with Samuel Ekwurtzel.

 

Tiffany Sum’s work explores the im/possibility of intimacy between body and technology. Through interactivity in participatory situations, impressions alternate between the visceral and palpable, the fleeting and intangible. The responsive environment generates a constantly changing social formation among the audience. The process of internalizing these impressions into personally meaningful enactments can be voluntary — as in the gallery, or involuntary — as in the public place.

 

Beth Campbell’s Artwork Is Toying With Your Perception

Blue Lamps, 2010

Blue Lamps, 2010

Stereo Table, 2012

Stereo Table, 2012

Bookshelf Loveseat, 2013

Bookshelf Loveseat, 2013

My parent’s bathroom at the house I first lived in had a full-length mirror behind the sink, which also had a mirror.  As soon as I was tall enough to see over the counter, I remember staring at an infinite number of my own reflections bouncing back and forth and I recall the frustration that I could never find where the reflections ended.  This is the memory invoked when I saw Beth Campbell’s work for the first time.

Working in a variety of mediums: drawings, sculpture and what she calls “architectural interventions,” Campbell’s body of work toys with perception.  Her Potential Future Based on Present Circumstances drawing series maps possible outcomes to present decisions.  These were the first works I saw by Campbell and I recall thinking how brilliant, but impossible they were.  Like me and my reflection in the mirror, Campbell was trying to make sense of the unrealistic and perhaps impractical idea that we can know what might have been.  Their humor and neurosis seemed so quintessentially human to me that I became an instant lover of her work.

Vasilis Avramidis’ Paintings Of Overgrown Gardens On The Edge Of Decay

Within the setting of his captured vistas Vasilis Avramidis typically paints an arrangement of symbolic motifs, rendered in a way to be suggestive of neglect. These depicted scenes and objects are overgrown with moss and ivy, alluding to an overriding sense of decay that the paintings’ inhabitants desire to control and maintain. These characters are gardeners, keepers of sites, land and buildings. They are the caretakers.

The paintings express a repetition of varying hues of green, a reference to the duality between sickness and growth and how the land eventually reclaims everything that sits upon it. Objects being imbued with foliage confirm these concepts of the ongoing and endless conflict between the forces of destruction and the forces of philosophical cultivation. This force of nature against man-made structures and ideologies not only conveys a relentless struggle but also comments on the history of art and architecture being overwritten and unearthed with the passing of time.

Peter Bowen

SKULL FACE

Peter Bowen, a London based illustrator, creates detailed works that carry a whole lot of raw energy and humor. A wide range of influences put a hand into his work, as he derives inspiration from lowbrow counter-culture to dense Victorian engravings.