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Outmane Amahou’s Minimalist Art Movement Posters



Designer Outmane Amahou‘s posters seem to need very few words accompanying them.  This series is appropriately called Minimalist Art Movement Posters.  Amahou glides through art history with a minimalist design style.  Icons of art history’s various movements and schools stand elegantly alone at the center of each poster.  Warhol’s soup can, Magrite’s pipe, Duchamp’s urinal all act as familiar symbols of their respective styles.

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Endearing Photographs Of People Explaining And Gazing At Art

Matthew Monteith photography1

Matthew Monteith photography7

Matthew Monteith photography5

The photographs of Matthew Monteith‘s series Guardare turn the subject back on to the viewer.  His images depict people explaining, gazing at, and otherwise admiring art.  When I first heard about the series I was prepared to be annoyed with the pedantic gestures and expressions of people acting smarter than thou.  However, the photographs are surprisingly endearing.  People are visibly moved, sincerely engaged with the work often just out of frame.  Guardare perhaps suggests that the art in a gallery doesn’t happen with the work but between two viewers discussing it.

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Florentijn Hofman’s Iconic Massive Sculptures

Internationally renowned artist Florentijn Hofman does not settle for less. His sculptures are large, very large, and are bound to make an impression. Take Rubber Duck (2007) for example: a gigantic 26-metre-high yellow rubber duck. It is an inflatable, based on the standard model that children from all four corners of the world are familiar with. The impressive rubber duck travels the world and pops up in many different cities: from Auckland and São Paulo to Osaka. A very positive artistic statement that immediately connects people to their childhood. Hofman’s sculptures often originate from everyday objects. A straightforward paper boat, a pictogram of an industrial zone or mass-produced little toy figures can all serve as sources. They are all ready-mades, selected by Hofman for the beauty of their forms. Subsequently he crafts these into clear and iconic images; cartoonish blow-ups of reality that alienate and unsettle through their sheer size and use of materials. Nevertheless they are immediately identifiable and have an instant appeal. (via faith is torment)

Cloud Made of Thousands of Lightbulbs at Nuit Blanche Festival in Calgary

Cloud is an installation piece from Calgary artist/filmmaker Caitlind Brown. The piece, part of the Nuit Blanche festival, involves 5,000 light bulbs, most of which are burnt out, that form a large cloud. Participants in the festival were able to pull on metal strings -rain- in order to illuminate sections of the “cloud”, giving off the impression of lightning. Imagine an entire landscape composed of lightbulbs- lightbulb sun, lightbulb trees, lightbulb mountains, etc. Lots of possibilities…

Click past the jump to see more photos of the piece. (via)

Mike Lay’s Native Pixies

Mike Lay’s drawings are a tripped out mix of native american pixies, mythological beasts, and hipster fashionista vampires. His work is delicate, detailed, psychedelic, and tips its hat at death metal imagery all at once.

Tom LaDuke


I had only one class with Tom LaDuke, but he became was of my most beneficial and most enjoyed professors. Much like his work, Tom is very perceptive; I always felt he was a few steps ahead of us. He inspired many of us to notice aesthetic details, a more clever title, a deeper level of thought – just something more than where our minds stopped at.

Even outside of class, Tom is still encouraging me to be better through his work. He works with challenging mediums, such as, sculpting with graphite, pencil leads, fingernails, eyelashes, and other fragile or unorthodox materials. He is always up to something. You notice this when you start seeing the different layers he puts into all his work, most notably his recent series of paintings where you become very aware of your process of perceiving images.

Marco Grassi Paints Hyper-Real Portraits Of Women With A Twist

Marco Grassi - Oil PaintMarco Grassi - Oil Paint

Marco Grassi - Oil Paint

Marco Grassi - Oil Paint

The works of artist Marco Grassi are so realistic, they appear to be photographs of women. However, his work is not your traditional portraits. If you look again, these portraits have an offbeat element, creating surreal characteristics that cannot possibly exist in real life. Because Grassi’s incredible skill in painting allows him to create such hyper-real images, the out of place component in each painting is our only clue to these being oil paintings and not photography. The artist impeccably renders such a variety of texture; until we believe we can feel the glossy, sleek glass and the soft fabric the women are wearing in Grassi’s work. Even close up, you can see the details of each wrinkle, pore and eyelash of every woman he paints, intensifying the illusion of reality.

The twist is, the women in Grassi’s paintings are not normal, they have a hand covered in intricate patterns or a blue tree stretching across their upper torso, both like glowing tattoos on their bodies. One woman even has a design carved into the skin on her back, revealing not blood and bones, but hollow darkness. However strange these unexpected details may be, the women in these portraits remain just as beautiful and realistic as ever. Despite the unusual, serial quality Grassi’s paintings have, they still appear believable. We are left in awe believing in these striking, mysterious women, not knowing why they look as they do. (via Hi-Fructose)