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Monica Piloni’s Dark Humor Sculptures Of Skeletal Fruit

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Brazilian artist Monica Piloni creates sculptures of skeletal fruit. Her work consist of dissected papayas, figs, oranges, and peaches that’s innards expose each fruit’s meat to be structurally held together by a spine and rib simulated structure. The tiny fish-like skeletal structures within each piece of fruit is created from vinyl and acrylic. Though the pieces are indeed manmade, the delicate nature of the work truly provokes the viewer to second guess his or her knowledge of reality. Illusion as everyday object seems to be a common theme within Piloni’s work. Her sculptures mimic ordinary items and manipulate them into sculptural puns. For example, other pieces of hers play with a sort of post-modern fragility of the body, a literal “plastification” of the human form. For instance, one of her sculptures is a muscular body as a dining room chair. Another piece consists of what looks like a mass genocide of naked barbies. It seems, perhaps, that Piloni’s work aims to, with an air of dark humor, remind us of the underlying reality of our comforts. Do these pieces of skeletal fruit remind us to be mindful of our consumption? Do we even really truly think about where what we consume comes from? What it’s made of? What death and harm simple everyday products causes to those who don’t have the luxury to partake on the demand side of capitalism? Simultaneously fun and disturbing, Monica Piloni’s work is provocative and inquisitive. (via designboom)

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Cornelia Konrads’ Anti Gravity Installations

Cornelia Konrads’ outdoor installations would appear normal on the moon where gravity is not a concern but on Earth they trick the eye and make viewers take a second look. Installing site specific works internationally, Konrads’ works appear to be in a constant flux, moving up, down, side to side and everywhere in between as if they areconstructing and deconstructing themselves over and over again. (via colossal)

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Yo Fukui @ David Salow Gallery

Japanese artist Yo Fukui currently has an exhibition up at David Salow Gallery until August 15th. I love the extraterrestrially crafted space-age battleship he constructed (above, from star date 3003, apparently). Though emerging from the cold hard star-steel of space lit only by an eerly lunar glow, Fukui creates his battleship from lovingly pastiched felt squares. It’s like Fukui is lovingly wrapping his grandmother’s quilt on the steely shoulders of the vast and infinite unknown future. Perhaps love still can exist even in the void of a black hole…at least, according to Fukui. If you are in the LA area, be sure to check out this exhibition.

Discreet Photos of Rural Roadside Prostitutes

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Roadside Prostitutes

Roadside Prostitutes

There’s an air of both mundaneness and mystery in the series The Waiting Game by Spanish photographer Txema Salavans. The blown-out landscape images were collected over a period of six years, and the intriguing photographs don’t depict hitchhikers – they feature prostitutes. We see women sitting at rural roadside locations along Spain’s Mediterranean coast, including highways, secondary highways, and small byways between towns. Formally, they are not the focus of Txema’s composition. They appear from a distance and sit on the side of the photo’s frame as road signs, wilderness, and construction sites surround them. The routes seem desolate but are still well traveled, as drivers want to avoid having to pay for toll roads, as well as trucks carrying goods and fruit take them from Andalucia to France.

Salavans disguised himself knowing that these women probably wouldn’t want their photos taken in the first place. He wore a surveyor’s costume, complete with an assistant and a surveyor’s pole. The results offer an unconventional into the world of prostitution that takes it off city streets and to quiet moments. (Via Feature Shoot)

Joe Kelly

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Joe Kelly is bringing some Rock n’ Roll with a Comic Book soul.  His work has a punk rock attitude served up in a crispy cutty illustration style.

Brice Chatenoud’s Severed Limbs

Brice Chatenoud’s grotesque photographs of displaced and severed limbs and body parts are surreal looks into an unknown world full of unexpected juxatpositions and bizarre displacements.

HAMIDOU MAIGA

Hamidou Maiga’s career as a photographer was launched in the early 1950s when he purchased his first camera, a medium format Souflex. At the age of twenty he learnt the rudiments of photography and printing through photojournalism, and in 1958 Maiga opened his first studio in N’Gouma. For two years he traced the route of the River Niger developing a clientele for his distinctive outdoor studio portraits. In 1960 he returned to Timbuktu with a successful business.

Ji Zhou’s Civlized Landscapes Create A 3D World Out Of Maps And Books

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Beijing based Ji Zhou’s latest photo series Civilized Landscape depicts models of urban and rural areas composed of books and maps he has modelled and rearranged into mountains, skyscrapers, and other landscapes. The models, placed on backgrounds made up of soothing, cool colors make for series of visually relaxing compositions full of original forms and reliefs. The textures of the various types of paper he uses in his models give the series a sort of irregular uniformity which brings the composition together in a perfect balance.

Civilized Landscape spans beyond aesthetics in the sense that the process Zhou goes through to create the models is also fascinating in its own respects. He creates the models by stacking sets of books and composing mountains from maps. He then photographs the models and creates a sort of in depth illusion that gives his work a sort of three dimensional aspect which in turn reinforces the nature of the optical illusion his project delivers. His work is centered on the idea of the “enhanced reality of illusion” , which he depicts through this series.

His project is also interesting from the perspective of the issues it addresses. Through his artificial depiction of familiar natural and urban landscapes, he raises questions of civilization and evolution as well as a debate on the place of human beings as both creators and destroyers of landscapes.