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Kevin Hayes

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Kevin Hayes is a Los Angeles based photographer with some really interesting and compelling imagery. What I find most interesting about his work it’s the way he captures and unveils the many characters in the photographs. Playing with the muted colors, lighting and backgrounds there’s is the sensation that time has stopped and a tension of what would have happened next after the shot was taken.

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Ryan De La Hoz’s Analog Patterns & Collages

Paper Cuts from Bradley Tangonan on Vimeo.

Long time pal and semi-recent B/D blog contributor Ryan De La Hoz not only likes to support fellow artists by blogging about them but also makes lots of wonderful work as well. In gearing up for his solo show at RVCA | VASF Gallery in SF Ryan took a few sneak peak photos for us of the new work. The show opens  Friday March 15th from 7 – 10pm and will feature an assortment of paintings, drawings, collage, and sculpture. Check out the video above for more insight into Ryan’s world and to learn about his analog art world.

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Reiner Hansen’s Paintings Of Multiple Personalities

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In artist Reiner Hansen’s series Facial Fallout, she paints self portraits that each depict a different persona. In some, she plays a character, like a reality star or the girl next door. In others, it’s another version of who she already is, but with a different hair style, skin sunburnt, and more. All of these are a departure of her true identity, which itself is fleeting and malleable based on who she was trying to be. Hansen explains:

Each is based on, or rather mapped onto, my own features and characteristics. My self image is re-conceived as these other women, who live in a world entirely different from my own. There is a process of transformation into involuntarily ‘stereotyped’ notions of who these people are or might be, a sort of method acting in painted form, leaving a history of performance in each image. Simultaneously a game that is playful as well as a meditative speculation on a fabricated ‘other life’, these images are partly about investigating the idea of ‘escape,’ not just away from ‘the self’ and into anonymity, but also away from the art historical traditions of the self portrait and its established practice of depicting the artist. Instead, concealing my self behind imagined personas, I attempt to escape identification.

These portraits are humorous, and part of the joy of looking at Hansen’s work is finding glimpses of her true self within all of these paintings.

Justin Brown Durand’s Art Giants

Justin Brown Durand is an artist/musician from Northampton MA… and he has some seriously strange output.  Pink deformed giants dancing naked with swollen hands and little faces.  Twisted distorted characters that look a tad bit insane. See more of Justin’s work after the jump listen to his amazingly weird music too at Heart Pump Arts.

Mother And Daughter Collaborate On Surreal Illustrations

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It’s hard not to be absolutely delighted with this story and these illustrations. Mica Angela Hendricks is an illustrator and graphic artist who used to keep her art projects separate from her daughter’s as a way to maintain control of artistic direction. One day, that changed when her 4-year-old insisted that Hendricks share her new sketchbook with her, finally berating her with, “we might have to take it away if you can’t share,” something Hendricks told her daughter often. So Hendricks let her finish the bodies of many faces she’d started (informed by old black and white movie stills), and was surprised and delighted with the results. Hendricks claims her daughter often has a focused direction when finishing a piece, and that her imagination is unpredictable.

After her daughter finishes drawing, Hendricks adds color and highlights, texture and painting to complete them. Her daughter critques most of them a bit harshly, but ultimately enjoys their collaboration. As for Hendricks, the collaboration means more to her than the creation of interesting and unique illustrations:

“…From it all, here are the lessons I learned: to try not to be so rigid. Yes, some things (like my new sketchbook) are sacred, but if you let go of those chains, new and wonderful things can happen. Those things you hold so dear cannot change and grow and expand unless you loosen your grip on them a little. In sharing my artwork and allowing our daughter to be an equal in our collaborations, I helped solidify her confidence, which is way more precious than any doodle I could have done. In her mind, her contributions were as valid as mine (and in truth, they really were). Most importantly, I learned that if you have a preconceived notion of how something should be, YOU WILL ALWAYS BE DISAPPOINTED. Instead, just go with it, just ACCEPT it, because usually something even more wonderful will come out of it.”

You can purchase prints of these delightful illustrations here. (via)

My Lover the Server

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For anyone who has received one of Facebook’s virtual gifts from a lover, or a sultry, romantically-inclined message from a high school crush via Myspace, check out the upcoming exhibition “My Lover The Server” at the Concrete Store, Amsterdam. Digital artists Champagne Valentine, above, have created a series of looping animated wallpapers that explore the notion of internet romance, drawing on real digital communications with web stalkers, strangers and actual lovers, inviting the public to remotely interact with the artwork. The exhibition, as Carrie from Sex and The City might type onto her 90’s Mac, can’t help but wonder…..Are .gifs the new bouquet of Roses?

“My Lover the Server” opens October 16th next week, and runs until October 31st.

Lauren Treece’s Dream

Lauren Treece’s polaroids remind me of a foggy dream I once had about a beautiful girl who lived in a magical secret world that can only be visited when your eyes are closed.

Melissa Brown’s Cave View

Nestled around a fire, inside a cozy cave, the first painter picked up some charcoal and drew a Mastodon.  The Cave is also the place where Plato described the world unenlightened people view as “shadows of the images the fire throws” against the back wall.  Courbet painted his cavern, The Source of the Loue, with an oarsman like the mythical Charon, ferrying people across the river Styx for a coin.  Caves are mysterious places, tied into our deepest roots: metaphors for our experiences, fears, and knowledge.  Melissa Brown, who we did a studio visit with a few months ago, has been working with an interesting group of printmakers at Random Number.  She has a new silkscreen out – Cave View.  Check, it, out.