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Russell Tyler’s Goopy Shapes

We posted about Russell Tyler about a year and a half ago, and since then some of his paintings have taken a slight minimalist turn. Granted, it’s not trying to be Frank Stella, but instead of the werewolves and all-over smorgasbords of characters and color, he’s giving us more geometric shapes and patterns whose bright pink and blue zig zags give it a kind of LA-gear flare. The goopy application is still there and they’re still joyful as ever, but it’ll be interesting to see if where Russell ends up as he keeps blending Niki de Saint Phalle and more geometric shapes. I can’t wait to see more!

Ps. If you’re in San Francisco check out Russell’s show opening November 9th at Fouladi Projects!

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Happy Thanksgiving From Beautiful/Decay!

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2009 has been a challenging year for all of us at Beautiful/Decay. We’ve switched formats, weathered the global financial meltdown, and moved to a new office (we’re almost unpacked!). Even with all these changes and challenges we have a lot to be thankful for. I wanted to take a second a our loyal and dedicated readers (that’s you!) for the constant feedback, participation, and support over the last year.

We have lots of exciting projects and ideas up our sleeves for the coming years and can’t wait to share them with all of you. Have a great thanksgiving everyone!

-Amir

ps. My mom cooks the meanest Tofurky ever. Thanks Mom!

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Alex Chinneck’s Incredible House Complete With Sliding Exterior

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Alex Chinneck is a London-based artist and designer, recently responsible for an installation that cleverly combines both disciplines. In Margate, a tiny town in Kent, England, a dilapidated home in the Cliftoncille district which had laid in ruins for months has been transformed. By remodeling the brick exterior and exposing the building’s top floor, Chinneck has altered the facade of the building to look as though it has become a single sheet and slid from the rest of the house.

Playfully titled From the knees of my nose to the belly of my toe, Chinneck extends his experimentation for surreal constructions and alterations of ordinary buildings (past projects include 312 identically smashed windows near the Olympic Stadium, and a melting brick wall). In an interview with Dezeen, Chinneck stated I just feel this incredible desire to create spectacles, I wanted to create something that used the simple pleasures of humour, illusion and theatre to create an artwork that can be understood and enjoyed by any onlooker.

Chinneck goes on to state some intentions of the piece, though admits they mostly have come after the piece’s construction. “It has social issues, it struggles with high levels of crime and the grand architecture has fallen into a fairly fatigued state,” says Chinneck, “I increasingly like that idea of exposing the truth and the notion of superficiality,” he explained. “I didn’t go into the project with that idea, but as it evolved I started to like that.

From the knees of my nose to the belly of my toe can be seen at  1 Godwin Road, Cliftonville, Margate UK, until October 2014, when it will again be turned into residential housing.

(via ignant and dezeen)

Documentary Watch: Skin- Tattoo Culture as high art

Directed by Ryan Hope, Skin is a dark, stylish examination of tattoo culture as high art, and a film that tests the boundaries of art and the human body. Featuring contributions from Damien Hirst, Jeff Koons and Raymond Pettibon, the film is a beautiful visual essay from the frontiers of contemporary British art. Watch the full documentary after the jump.

Jack Vanzet

Jack Vanzet, an Australia-based designer, is not limited to just one look but an array of styles all equally beautifully mastered. The one common ground between these differing pieces is that each of these show great attention to the foundational design.

Interview: Drew Beckmeyer

I Don't Believe In Anything But This Is Transcendent

I Don't Believe In Anything But This Is Transcendent

Drew Beckmeyer creates quirky paintings that fuse visuals from different times and spaces, often pairing unexpected scenes with seemingly personal and historical references. They are both charming and mysterious works that teeter between whimsical and ominous. Beautiul/Decay recently interviewed Drew regarding his process, and even took a sneak peak at his studio behind the scenes.

Akroe

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Etienne Bardelli, also known as Akroe, was a graffiti artist before he became a well respected graphic designer. Twenty years later, on his own time, he can still be found painting empty walls in the less populated parts of France. (Although he admits: “Actually, I don’t really know why I’m still doing it!”) Graffiti may be illegal, but surely this counts as beautification?

Hunter Stabler’s Cut Out World

Insanely intricate and beautiful drawings and cut paper works by Hunter Stabler.