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Jenny Saville

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Oxford, England based artist Jenny Saville, is frightening in how she is so good in what she does. Her paintings always make me feel uncomfortable, and in that way, seduced as well. She is mostly known for her paintings of large, fleshy women that quite often appear similar to landscapes or a huge slab of meat. It’s a desire of mine to one day see her work in person. Amir has, and apparently photographic records of her work does not do it justice.

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Izumi Kato’s Paintings Of Angelic Dolls On The Verge Of Breaking Apart

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Izumi Kato’s characters resemble angelic porcelain dolls. On the verge of breaking apart, they don’t seem to care. They just are, and that’s why they are so touching. The artist, from the tips of his fingers; with which he paints; brings to life innocent beings with extraterrestrial features. Their googly eyes, cracked noses and little bodies create an eerie harmony in the painting. So much that we would almost want to nurture them in real life.

As if he knew, their “dad” turned them into sculptures. He made them out of wood, three-dimensional, and as moving as their little brothers and sisters.

All that they evoke; strangeness, ambiguity, revulsion or sympathy is meant to dig into our contemplation on relationships. The poetic landscape of morbid embryos leads to question the nature of interaction with others but foremost with oneself.
Izumi Kato elegantly directs the viewer’s eyes to the characters’ heads, growing out of their svelt bodies, totemic figures; a blend of ancient Egypt and tribal African culture. He creates a bridge to our own head and thoughts because he wants the viewer to develop their own ideas from his abstract paintings and sculptures.

“Painting challenges the world. It is an unnatural form that has been singled out from our current three-dimensional living space. There is nothing strange about sculpture in our world, but painting is different. We search for another world in it.”

Izumi Kato is currently represented by Gallery Perrotin

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Chris Labrooy’s playful 3D illustrations

I’m absolutely loving the 3D illustrations of Chris Labrooy with their dynamic sense of color, composition, and playful humor. If that’s not enough Labrooy also has a brilliant eye for typography, creating custom typefaces out of everything from people to architecture. (via)

Andrew Holmquist

I’m loving the explosive mix of gestural abstraction and slowed  down moments of representation in the work of Chicago painter Andrew Holmquist.

Anton Van Dalen

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Stylistically speaking, Anton’s drawings hark back to Italian Futurism- glorification of youth, violence, and fantasies of what pleasure advances in science could bring to humanity. It would seem though that instead of elevating technology (can’t we invent another word for this already?) he is mocking it by celebrating the very icons it is now embodied by. Or better yet, the empire that now belongs to Steve Jobs.

Nathan Vincent’s Six Foot Crocheted Doily Warns ‘Be Good For Goodness Sake’

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Santa is not the only one you telling you to be good for goodness sakes. In today’s word, that is, in today’s virtual, and real life panopticon, you have no other choice but to be good for the sake or yourself, your life, your job, etc. Your success as a human being depends on your good (or bad?) pubic, and well documented, behavior. Everyone is watching, everyone is judging.

“Be Good for Goodness Sake”,a three-person show featuring works by Nathan Vincent, Iviva Olenick, and Kathy Halper at the Muriel Guepin Gallery in New York, explores ideas of surveillance and public performance in the age of the virtual panopticon (intagram, facebook, etc).

Taking its name from Vincent’s large-scale work installed in the gallery,  “Be Good for Goodness Sake” pushes audiences to question their stance on surveillance and privacy in the age of social media.

Nathan Vincent’s six-foot crocheted doily acts as Big Brother and it invites the spectators to to sit on a bench flanked by security cameras, while Kathy Halper and Iviva Olenick create embroideries that question the psychosocial impacts of intimate over-sharing via social media. Inspired by her own Facebook feed, Olenick uses embroidery and watercolor to render her own “selfies” and portraits of others. Halper’s work similarly questions the disappearing space between public and private online through embroidered drawings of found images from teens’ Twitter and Facebook accounts.

The exhibition, “Be Good for Goodness Sake” will be on view at the Muriel Guepin Gallery in New York until January 19th, 2014.

Idan Friedman’s Ordinary People & Disposable Objects

Idan Friedman creates portraits of everyday people embossed by hand on disposable tin trays. However this series reminds me of stories you hear about someone seeing the popes image on a moldy slice of bread.

Inodoro Design

Inodoro Design is a collective based in Cebu City, Philippines that cranks out bold design, packaging, illustration, and web related projects.