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Giveaway Alert! Biggest Magazine stack wins!

Magazine Rack Contest

If you’re anything like us here at Beautiful/Decay, you are no doubt avid zine/magazine readers & collectors. So, in celebration of print, we are holding a competition- whoever shows us their collection of magazines in the most creative way will win an Offi – “W” Magazine Stand in Walnut ($169 value!). The mag rack comes compliments of the online shop All Modern, which carries an excellent selection of modern furniture & housewares by brands such as Knoll, Herman Miller, Blomus, Alessi, etc. So send in your artwork/design/photographs of the craziest, biggest, messiest stack of magazines to:[email protected].

We’ll post all the entries on our blog next week and will pick a winner on Monday.

Deadline: Monday, July 6th, 10am PST!

About the Offi – “W” Magazine Stand in Walnut
Designed by West Coast product designer Eric Pfeiffer, the magazine reflects a penchant for simplicity and a useful and elegant solution to everyday living. Pfeiffer’s works evoke timeless forms that recognize a product’s usefulness and necessity while exhibiting the beauty of its material.

Advertise here !!!

Awesome Video Of The Day: El Kamino

 

I’ve known El Kamino for more than 15 years having shared many memories of painting graffiti during our youth. He’s a hard character to pin down as he rarely makes public appearances and prefers lurking in the shadows than using technology to promote his work. That’s why I was blown away when he made this very rare appearance on camera to discuss his work and his process. Enjoy!

Advertise here !!!

Adam Martinakis’ Digital Worlds

Polish pixel wizard Adam Martinakis’ digital illustrations are out of this world. I can’t figure out if these started as photographs, elaborate sets, or live completely within the computer but they are impressive nevertheless.(via vectro ave)

Sigmar Polke Dies at 69

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Polke, Hope Is: Wanting to Pull Clouds (1992)

German painter and photographer Sigmar Polke (1941 – 2010) died yesterday from complications of cancer, according to Gordon Veneklasen, the artist’s main American representative. Polke invigorated the world of pop art and beyond with his parodic examinations of consumerism and politics, especially those concerning post-war Germany. The artist resisted artistic conventions by expanding on ideas of “what art is” with his multi-faced, mixed media pieces.

“We cannot rely on it that good painting will be made one day. We have to take the matter in hand ourselves,” Polke once said. A bit of an understatement, but I’ll allow Polke’s “good painting” to speak for itself. Check out more of my favorites after the cut.

Artist Conrad Roset’s Seductive Watercolors Boldly Capture The Female Figure

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Barcelona based artist Conrad Roset defines the “Muse” in his incredibly seductive works made using watercolor and ink. Pulling inspiration from the raw nudes of Austrian artist Egon Schiele, his female figures stretch and bend in elegant ways, forming distinct, bold lines across the composition. He uses deep, black ink that covers up these women’s bodies like a veil, creating a harsh contrast to their pale skin. Each muse wears this blanket of black beautifully, as if it is her own shadow. Conrad Roset uses sparks of color to highlight the flora that appear in his work and also in certain rosy cheeks and the tips of fingers and toes. The subtly of the color and line creates a delicate contrast to the richness of the heavy black ink.

Conrad Roset explains that,

“I search the beauty the body exudes, I like drawing the female figure.”

He is intrigued and focused on the female figure as a subject. The women in his illustrations are undoubtedly stunning, and can also seem both fragile and strong. They are bold in nature but delicate in beauty. Roset’s body of work has a high fashion flavor, as he has done work for clients such as Zara and Elle Magazine. His captivating works are on view now at Spoke Art Gallery in San Francisco. His debut, solo exhibition titled Pale will be on view there until September 26th. (via Hi-Fructose)

Ari Weinkle’s Squirming Typography Made From Animal Appendages Will Make Your Skin Crawl

Ari Weinkle - Digital TypographyAri Weinkle - Digital Typography

Ari Weinkle - Digital Typography

Ari Weinkle has created an extremely unique and bizarre typography, titled Feelers, that moves and squirms with each carefully constructed letter. This is no ordinary alphabet; each letter is formed from different animal appendages. Weinkle designed his somewhat creepy typography to be explore and interpret the movements of animals and their body parts. It is hard to believe that these odd colored squiggles were once part of animals, especially since they look like amoebas, worms, or insect parts. The way the ends of the letters taper in at each end and sways back and forth closely resembles aquatic life such as seaweed moving in the water.

One aspect of this typography project that makes its concept so interesting, is trying to determine what appendage could have possibly made the type of movement that the individual letter is making. Even more intriguing, is that not every part of the letter moves. Some stand still while others whip back and forth, spread apart, or jump quickly away from the viewer. The movement is so organic, it is almost as if these alphabet creatures are pinned under a microscope and we are watching them squirm. Although the letters are hard to determine once they begin to wiggle, you cannot deny the unique creativity behind this mesmerizing typography. Make sure to check out Ari Weinkles Tumblr to see every single letter of his alphabet in its still form, and then again as 26 organically moving organisms.

Ryan Travis Christian Exhibit At Halsey MCKAY Gallery

It’s not everyday that we post about an exhibit in East Hampton, New York but our good pal Ryan Travis Christian has an exhibit of his gorgeous drawings at the premiere East Hampton contemporary art space HALSEY MCKAY GALLERY (run by talented painter Ryan Wallace). You may remember our feature spread on Ryan’s work in the now sold out Beautiful/Decay: What A Mess book with it’s mind bending patterned detail that flows back and forth between abstraction and representation.

Christian describes his show Something, Something, Black Something as being “about pulling it off or not. Like trying something new and failing or succeeding, or trying something old and failing or succeeding. It’s about losing functionality or becoming functional in a completely different fashion. It about garbage and glitz having equal rank. It’s like finding money on the ground or having a stranger slap the back of your neck as hard as possible while you are on a nature hike. It’s similar to an uphill tumbleweed. It’s like realizing a fourth of an idea, or almost remembering something you want to say. It’s like having a clear mind and vibrator eyes.”

Make sure to head over to HALSEY MCKAY between now and August 7th to catch Ryan’s show. If you’re stuck out west and still need your RTC fix you can see a great exhibit of work curated by Ryan over at Double Break Gallery in San Diego featuring works by over 120 artists (including yours truly).

Jack Henry’s Discarded Waste Monuments

Jack Henry lives and works in New York. Using resin, cement, and found objects he creates cast pillars of discarded debris surrounded by swirls of color. In his own words: “I appropriate discarded objects seen by the roadside to create monuments to post-industrial America. The selection process is focused on man-made objects and structures such as: dilapidated houses, roadside memorials, tattered billboards, and other discarded materials. Each object is reinterpreted and presented as an artifact or a natural history museum model of something pulled from the contemporary landscape.The purpose is to evoke a sense of wonder from the banal byproducts of our failed but once successful modern society. Instead of merely pushing these man-made items into the peripheral of our everyday routine, I recreate the curiosities that happen when they depart from contact with people to move, decay, and harbor with other items to create monuments to cultural disaffection. “