Get Social:

Spine-Chilling Paintings Of Suffering by Dr. Kevorkian, Practitioner Of Assisted Suicide

Dr. KevorkianDr. KevorkianDr. KevorkianDr. Kevorkian

The late Dr. Jack Kevorkian, known for his life’s work of advocating assisted suicide and for helping to end over 130 lives with his ominous-sounding Thanatron, or “machine of death,” was also an oil painter. The doctor, who spend 8 years in prison, created a little-known body of work tinged with the horror of pain; illustrating his controversial ideas on compassion, the paintings take aim at his religious critics and appeal to a nuanced moral ideal where death is seen simultaneously as a terror and an escape.

Kevorkian’s Thanatron takes its name from the ancient Greek personification of death; in his paintings, he also uses mythological themes. In “Fever,” he illustrates a hell composed of the ill and suffering; like Dante’s Virgil, he leads his painted patient through the depths of agony and fear with wide, sweeping brushstrokes. The Christian Brotherhood is reimagined as a monster characterized by multiple grotesque, sharp-toothed heads vaguely reminiscent of Inferno’s Satan.

Seemingly drawing inspiration from symbolist painters like Paul Gauguin and Edvard Munch, the artist, often referred to as “Dr. Death,” distorts the form of his subjects so that they might express psychological despair and heightened anxiety. In one image, titled “Coma,” a man, draped in a bed sheet, is inhaled by ghostly skull, his body absurdly foreshortened and his lined feet disproportionately swelled to express profound weariness. As the monstrous spirit of “coma” sucks him in, his tiny, darkened eyes beg for release. In “Paralysis,” the body becomes a prison, the brain removed and bound in chains.

When exhibited alongside the doctor’s paintings illustrating his love of music (Johann Sebastian Bach, a treble and bass clef), as they are at Gallerie Sparta, the more frightful images take on a strange operatic quality, evoking eery tonal climaxes with expressionistic bursts of color. 11 of the doctor’s paintings will be on view through April 30. (via Huff Post)

Advertise here !!!

Eric White

ericwhite-noneutral_04

Eric White is a painter living and working in Brooklyn. He creates work that challenges the body with differing proportions, repetition, and color. The work is exquisite in every sense, and owns the world it lives in completely.

Advertise here !!!

Artie Vierkant

Line-Item-Icon_web-685x1024 Artie Vierkant is an artist from San Diego, CA. His work includes paintings, sculpture, and a massive array of digital works. He has even taken Avatar the movie and superimposed it onto a spinning sphere. Most of the works “concern how digital media can constitute fully tangible objects.” His work includes too much to mention. Check out his site and more of his work.

Shay Kun’s Photo Realistic Dreamlike paintings

 

Shay Kun’s paintings push viewers to challenge their philosophical and aesthetic limitations. While the paintings use appropriated images from the internet, glossy magazines and daily life, they question where fantasy begins and reality ends. Our dreams and thoughts are capable of taking us on journeys beyond reality, but when do we actually cross that threshold? Could we have actually experienced scenes as we remember them?

Each piece in the exhibition explores fantasy and escapism not only with evocative imagery, but also with a variety of source materials and methods of display. In Brief Encounter, Kun offers a film noir still of a car driving into the depths of a rainy night and invites onlookers to remember not only familiar films with similar atmospheres, but their own experiences with departure and loss. Kun also manipulates the foreground into a complex, dramatic tableau; the foreground presents an almost surrealist puddle without the literal interference of a window. Condensation from precipitation, however, is reserved for the background; the scenario is physically impossible, and the painting teases the mind to understand its dissonance.

Objects like ropes, hot air balloons and old-fashioned cars accrue an almost satirical element with their nostalgic references to a pleasant past and childhood. These idyllic environments are predominately kept in the background of these pieces, but the masterfully painted objects feel at once fresh with their photo-realistic qualities. These are contemporary works that challenge the effectiveness of memory and suggest that nostalgia shapes and colors our interpretations of the past.

Camille Rose Garcia’s Dark Fantasy Paintings

 

 

If you don’t know about Camille Rose Garcia and her twisted fantasy worlds, now you know. The artist has been killin’ it for a while with dark mixed media paintings that are easy on the eyes the way the poisonous apple in Snow White tastes good- you know there’s something sinister at work here, but you can’t help yourself anyway. Garcia’s colorful works feature animals and pretty ladies, neither of which are innocent. Watch your back. More snaps after the jump, and check out her blog, which, if not updated regularly, is a nice window into what the artist’s thinking.

Mysterious Meyoko

meyokoinkdrawigI was perusing the Beautiful/Decay Creative Pic Flickr Pool this morning and came across Meyoko’s densely delicate ink drawings. Half Arcimboldo’s grotesque fruit heads, half seething with creatures from the garden of  Hieronymous Bosch‘s earthly delights, Meyoko’s works flit, tangle, weave, drip, and feather their way into strange specters. I realized I’ve seen her work before, somewhere, though I can’t recall exactly, so when it popped up on our Flickr page like a repeat-dream I was strangely enchanted- fitting I suppose! More works after the jump. I can’t seem to find any other information about her aside from her Flickr page. So, Meyoko, if you want to tell us who you are (or anyone knows the whereabouts of this mysterious ink-chanteuse) let me know!

Stencil Of 9,000 Bodies On Normandy Beach Created To Mark International Peace Day

article-2429903-183155D900000578-777_634x422

article-2429903-183151E700000578-459_634x422

article-2429903-183153B900000578-617_634x422

article-2429903-183154A900000578-863_634x419

The Fallen, an installation by two British artists [Jamie Warley and Andy Moss], entails striking silhouettes of fallen soldiers on Arromanches beach in Normandy. The project is a tribute to the civilians, German forces, and Allies who lost their lives during the Operation Neptune landing on June 6, 1944 on Normandy Beach.

The artists, together with a team of volunteers, traveled to the site in order to create the silhouettes, which were individually drawn into the sand with pre-prepared stencils.

After the completion of about 9,000 imprints, the shapes were then left to wash away by the beach waves; a poetic visual composition that reminds us that life is temporary.

“The idea is to create a visual representation of what is otherwise unimaginable, the thousands of human lives lost during the hours of the tide during the Second World War Normandy landings. People understand that so many lives were lost that day but it’s incredibly difficult to picture that number.”

Veterans and families, including some who have lost loved ones in recent conflicts were involved in the ‘Fallen’ project. (Via DailyMail Online)

Jessica Harrison’s Disturbing Skin Sculptures

skin sculpture skin couch Jessica Harrison

These disturbing sculptures, created by Jessica Harrison, seem to be made out of real, fleshy skin and hair. For your relief, that is not the case; they are actually made out of the casts of the palms and back of the artist’s hands. The artist chooses to photograph these sculptures against real skin, her hands, to trick her viewers into thinking that the actual sculpture might in fact be an extension of her body. Blurring these boundaries and limits of the body, Harrison provokes questions about perceptions and bodily shapes in relation to the two of the five sense, touch and sight.

Her research considers the relationship between interior and exterior spaces of the body, but looks neither inwards towards a hidden core, nor outwards from the subconscious, instead looking orthogonally across the skin to the movement of the body itself, using the surface of the body as a mode of both looking and thinking.

(Via Ignant)