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Dimitri Karakostas’ Toronto Youth

What’s photographer Dimitri Karakostas up to in Toronto? Apparently a good time. Must be good to be young in Canada!

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THOUSANDS OF STICKERS REPRESENT TEL AVIV’S STREET ART AND INNER TURMOIL AT MESHUNA GALLERY

Meshuna Gallery - Street Art 1

Meshuna Gallery - Street Art 12

Meshuna Gallery - Street Art 3

Meshuna Gallery - Street Art 2

Oren Fischer and Anton Avramov are the owners of the Meshuna Gallery in Tel Aviv. First thought as a studio space for both artists, they decided to dedicate one of the rooms to exhibit new artists; mainly street artists. Located in the Florentin area, surrounded by graffiti walls, Meshuna Gallery welcomed this past Saturday Prettimess, a small art collective to present the STICKERZ! exhibition. 

31 artists were invited to design all sorts of stickers. Some of them were available to buy on site, some were displayed on road signs all over the gallery, others were printed in a large version and sold as a set in collaboration with DaSilva skateboards. The rest of the stickers were sold in small packages at affordable prices (5 US$).

The idea behind the stickers is to promote “culture for the people”. An immediate, effective and fun medium to spread the artist message directly to the mass. By making exhibitions, parties and alternative events the young Israeli collective behind this event reveals young and talented culture activists (all linked to alternative sport, urban art and music scene).

So why the rise of street art in Tel Aviv? According to Nneya Richards from PaperMag the graffitis in the city are seen as a pure way to express ideas and are not always fined.
“It’s no secret that some of the best art comes out of social turmoil and, in recent years, nothing is a better reflection of this than the burgeoning street art scene in Tel Aviv”

You can check out both Meshuna Gallery and Prettimess Art Collective on their Facebook Page as well as on Instagram @meshuna.gallery 

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James Blagden

James Blagden

Brooklyn artist James Blagden isn’t worried about offending you with racial stereotypes. Or rather the aim is to offend to get the point across. Fusing together a myriad of influences and topics found in African American popular culture, the artist pokes fun at the ideas and images we accept on a regular broadcasted basis. Whatever the common conception, the nerdiness of Asians in mainstream cinema, African Americans and basketball, gold teeth and bling, he’s done it all. Check out an interview Format Mag did on James.

rabinal

dbp13ts - period 13 attractor by rabinal

Not sure what the process is, or what we’re looking at, but the official response to “….How…?” is: “This is a typical electronic chaotic system. The circuits and block diagram are published elsewhere in this set. It shows a stable “chaotic transient” which at some irregular time (from one run to the next) eventually falls into a trap. It is supposed to indicate what may happen to the planet’s climate patterns in the future, although it is not likely in that case that the trap region will be so regular. In this system the timing of the trapping event is unpredictable.” Flickr user rabinal insists that it’s not art, though…. We beg to differ.

Magazine Prints Its Latest Issue With Ink Infused With HIV+ Blood

Vangardist MagazineVangardist Magazine Vangardist Magazine Vangardist Magazine

In an attempt to finally stop the social stigma surrounding HIV, the German magazine Vangardist has printed over 3000 copies of their latest issue in a special ink infused with HIV+ blood. The blood was taken from 3 different volunteers who are living with the virus, and combined with printing ink at a ratio of 28 parts ink, to 1 part blood. Scientists at Harvard and Innsbruck Universities have come up with a unique way of mixing the two substances, and are certain the hard copies of the magazine carry no risk of infection. Even with all the assurances of the paper being perfectly safe to handle, the concern surrounding HIV is still worrying some critics. It would seem the attitude to the HIV virus is not so different to those of 30 years ago.

Julian Wiehl – the Publisher and CEO of Vangardist recognizes this and thought they could help inform people on the touchy subject. He says:

The editorial team at Vangardist is committed to dealing with a wide variety of topics affecting our readers. We believe that as a lifestyle magazine it is our responsibility to address the issues shaping society today.  With 80% more confirmed cases of HIV being recorded in 2013 than 10 years previously, and an estimated 50% of HIV cases being detected late due to lack of testing caused by social stigma associated with the virus.  This felt like a very relevant issue for us to focus on not just editorially but also from a broader communications stand point. (Source)

The launch of the Spring issue was designed to coincide with the Life Ball – one of the most important HIV events in the world, held in Vienna. The magazine has been available to subscribers since April 28th, and there is an online campaign that aims to breakdown the taboo. Be sure to read more about it here. (Via Fastcodesign)

Awesome Video Of The Day: Luis

Luis is the 2nd short video of the series “Lucía, Luis y el lobo” (”Lucía, Luis and the Wolf”). The video was shot frame by frame with a digital photo camera. Materials: charcoal, dirt, flowers, found objects and cardboard.

By Niles Atallah, Cristobal Leon & Joaquin Cociña

Nick Cave

nick cave head explode

Chicago artist Nick Cave is currently showing at the Fowler Museum. We got a chance to interview him last year. Nick transforms found objects into what he calls “Soundsuits”.  These suits are not just sculptural works but meant to be worn.  Imagine wearing one of these to the next costume party you attend? Performers inside the suits emit noises, hence the title “Soundsuits”.  The above image reminds me of our BD shirt: Explosion.  Apparently Cave, an Alvin-Ailey trained dancer, plans to eventually have a world-traveling show with 90 Soundsuit-creatures.

Adam David Brown’s Video Projections and Cut-Outs from Books

 

Adam David Brown creates installations, often with video projection and altered publications. He removes small selections from established objects and expands them on a large scale, highlighting and contextualising material that may have otherwise been overlooked. This practice of presenting part and whole in juxtaposition with each other is an intelligent take on concepts of emptiness, individuality, and history. And to top it all off, Brown’s work is really interesting visually, as well. I could stare at these for a while.(via)