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Eucalyptus Infused Luxury

After a long day in front of a computer pushing pixels and designing stuff the last thing I want to do is stare at a treadmill ticking off the minutes. I prefer group activities like yoga, pilates, the bar method, etc. And let’s face it, at typical gym these classes consist of wannabe actors phoning in a tired, repetitive routine until they force you to stop taking their class. On the other hand buying a series of classes at a yoga studio can run you $200 or more a month… what if you get bored of down dogs several times a week?

That’s where Equinox comes in, all of their classes are included in their membership fees so you have the pick of the litter: cycling, yoga, pilates, kick boxing, bar method- you name it. And the classes are plenty challenging, the Cardio Burn class had me running to grab a eucalyptus infused cold towel to keep from passing out. There’s so much to choose from, it leaves no time for boredom. And when you consider how much variety you have, the membership fee is a bargain. Curious? Take advantage of the 3 day trial membership and work up the need for a cold towel yourself.

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Josh Atlas’ Donut and Frosting Sculptures And Drawings

I don’t know anyone who loves donuts quite as much as Josh Atlas and so it’s wonderful to see him utilizing his passion within the context and even materials of his fine art practice. He’s made sculptures incorporating real elements of frosting as well as encasing a donut within a picture frame surrounded by sprinkles. However, don’t panic, since he does it all in a way in which he’s able to preserve the materials so that they don’t disintegrate or attract fruit flies. After all, besides being one of my favorite artists working today, he’s also kind of a genius. I mean, he recently graduated with his bfa from Carnegie Melon University!!! But what I think draws me to his work most is that it’s all about what he calls “The Holy Trinity of Want” – food, love, and sex – and he showcases it all with a gigantic sense of elegant humor.

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Michael Shapcott

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Michael Shapcott is an emerging artist from Connecticut. His paintings and illustrations take traditional portraiture and add elements of folklore and dream imagery, his main source of inspiration. His work is nothing less than powerful, inspiring, and emotional.

Awesome Video Of The Day: !!!

I imagine the inspiration for !!!’s Jamie, My Intentions Are Bass video is 70’s porn set meets 2010 hip motion reel meets Miami pool party where a spontaneous performance piece by a recent MFA takes place.

Julia Sonmi Heglund

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Visual artist Sonmi Heglund revisits pop-culture creatures of the past and presents many new characters and stories of her own, in an intricate and graphic illustrative style. Dracula, Jiminy-Cricket, and weeping eyes… oh my!

Interactive LED Dress Changes Color When The Wearer Is Menstruating Or Touched Inappropriately

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Elizabeth Tolson‘s range of interactive, light up futuristic styled dresses are a light-hearted look at quite serious topics. Called Vessel, the concept centers around two garments – the Fertility Dress and the Chastity Dress. Combining cutting edge technology, soft circuity, connective threads, connective garments, simple switches and plain white cotton, Tolson has created two innovative wearable art pieces that are dealing with feminist issues.

The Fertility Dress works in cohesion with the female body. It contains lights that change color depending on the woman’s menstruation cycle and fertility. The lights turn blue to indicate ovulation, red for menstruation, and glow white to indicate excellent hygiene, and finally, turn yellow to denote poor hygiene levels. This dress is meant to not only display internal bodily states, but also to remind us that woman are fertile beings, all day, everyday.

The Chastity Dress is a combination of lights and sounds, triggered by sensors that go off if certain parts of the garment are touched. Tolson explains more:

So the final result of the Chastity dress had sensors so when the girl in it was touched inappropriately, sensors went off to remind her of how she should behave. It was creating an audience for the girl as an object because she needs to watched over. It was a way for people to be aware of her actions, but she also needs to be aware. I also created a bra that has sensors so if you push her chest it creates a high-pitched noise. (Source)

Inspired by strange dating books she was sent from her mother, Tolson wanted to draw attention to some outdated attitudes that still exist about female sexuality. With a playful , tongue-in-cheek mentality, Tolson manages to raise awareness about gender politics, marriage equality, abortion laws, birth control and a whole plethora of topics most people love to avoid. Read more about her work here. (Via Design Faves)

Rena Littleson’s My 2 Cents

Australian artist Rena Littleson’s “My 2 Cents” is a RENAFIED experience of the gambling world. A colorful and comical creation of paintings, installations, games, fashion, fun and fortune, inspired by the years that Rena worked as an artist for a poker machine company. Check out some of Rena’s earlier work here.

Marcus DeSieno’s Beautiful and Terrifying Photos Of Microscopic Parasites

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It is fair to assume that while most of us know that our world, our living spaces, and even our bodies are covered with microscopic organisms, we do like to not be reminded of it. Photography student Marcus DeSieno’s recent photoseries begs to differ, offering a beautiful yet disturbingly close look at our microscopic natural surroundings. Parasites is an ongoing project “investigating a history of scientific exploration through images of parasitic animals.” Taken with a Scanning Electron Microscope and then exposed onto dry plate gelatin ferrotype plates, a process which combines classical and cutting-edge photographic techniques. The final images are archival pigment prints from the scanned ferrotype plates and printed larger for these abject animals to confront the viewer at a one-on-one scale.

“Photography and science have had an intrinsic relationship since its’ invention in 1839. It did not take William Henry Fox Talbot long until he was using his calotype process to capture what was under the lens of his microscope. The indexical nature of photography has pushed the reaches of science ever forward into the 21st century. These technologies allow us to peer in to the unexamined corners of the natural world reminding us that the universe around us is much greater than ourselves. In this realm of scientific curiosity, photography has a intriguing relationship with the invisible, allowing us to see the world that we cannot. Parasites explores these themes of science and wonder and, at the same time, confronts a personal fear of these parasitic organisms that attach themselves to humans. Embedded in the work is an engaging dialog with photographic history, its\’ shifting modes of representation, and its’ material possibilities. Parasites investigates the role of shifting photographic technologies in contemporary culture and their abilities to capture a mysterious and unseen world.”