Get Social:

Tom Birkner’s Rainy Windshield Oil Paintings Evoke The Spirit Of Tom Waits

Tom Birkner - Painting Tom Birkner - PaintingTom Birkner - Painting

Maybe it’s because I live in Los Angeles where rain is seldom and driving culture is strong, but these oil paintings by Tom Birkner make me want to dig through my tape collection– yup, tapes– and pop a little Tom Waits in before heading out onto the highway. I would extrapolate on this connection, but I think the actual lyrics from “Diamonds On My Windshield” illustrate it best–

Blazing through this midnight jungle
Remember someone that you met
One more block; the engine talks
And whispers ‘home at last’
It whispers, whispers, whispers
‘home at last’, home at last

Advertise here !!!

The Dutch Use Abstraction To Creatively Censor Sensitive Google Maps Images

Mishka Henner photography9 Mishka Henner photography11

Mishka Henner photography3

The advent of Google maps was eventful for the general public – it became the first time most of us had access to these views of earth.  However, it also turned out to be problematic for some governements.  Some governments obscure areas they deem too sensitive to appear on Google maps.  This is generally done by simple blurring or covering an area with a white or black box.  In his series Dutch Landscapes, Mishka Henner presents the unique censorship of the Dutch countryside.  The Dutch forgo simpler censorship methods for a strangely attractive one.  Variously shaped and colored polygons cover sites the government would rather keep off the map.  Inadvertently (or perhaps intentionally) the Dutch government abstracts the landscape in way that fits in well with an artistic tradition.

Advertise here !!!

Surreal Portraits Of Skulls Made With Items Found In Your Junk Drawer

Head_0007_08 Head_0006_07 DSC09069head-2up-2

If you are a collector of random things or have an impressive junk drawer, then you will probably appreciate the work of artists Edwige Massart and Xavier Wynn. The duo, who are also married, have taken a random assortments of trinkets and chachkis and assembled them into cross-section sculptures of the human head. Their surreal series is aptly titled Heads, which appear to look like medical diagrams.

In Massart and Wynn’s portraits, we see stones, seashells, door handles, yarn, and even pieces of wood that make up the contents of the skull. There doesn’t seem to be any sort of thematic tie to any of the objects, but that doesn’t detract from how fun and interesting these works are. This series could tell us more about the artists themselves rather than tying a story to the heads. We’re able to see all of the things they’ve collected and all of the memories made by virtue of owning these possessions.  (Via Colossal)

Matthew Palladino’s New Claustrophobic Paintings

We have featured the work of NY based Matthew Palladino on the blog in the past (here). He has an uncanny ability to reveal subtle dark humor within everyday objects and situations. Palladino has just unveiled a new series of vinyl on canvas and ink on paper paintings that extend his cryptic vision. Figures sway as his claustrophobic compositions warp and pulsate. In other pieces fabric swatches shift and mutate throughout explosive abstractions. In his own words, “The work I make is not like science, it doesn’t begin with a question. It instead tends to end in a question.”

Justin Bua Disses Robert Rauschenberg!

I thought long and hard about whether I should post this but even after a good nights sleep i’m still angered by this video. If you’re not familiar with Justin Bua he is an illustrator primarily focusing on urban imageries of dj’s, breakdancers, and other various hip-hop related imagery. What do we think of his work? Well lets just say you won’t find him featured in B/D anytime soon. But I digress.

Beata Wilczek

Beata Wilczek is an artist and photographer living in Wrocław, Poland. Through her photography work and her collages, she mixes old and new whilst retaining a feminine edge. Check out more of her work below.

Drawings Of Hybridized Worlds On Layered Mylar

Anthony Coicolea - Drawing

Anthony Coicolea - Drawing IAnthony Coicolea - Drawing

In his latest series of drawings, Anthony Coicolea poetically engages with the term “pathetic fallacy” or our own egocentric inclination to prescribe human characteristics or qualities to all living things. His imagery, done beautifully with simple graphite on layered mylar, allows worlds to overflow with new pattens of transcendence despite an archaic old world order.

Of this series, the artist statement suggests, “In a new hybridized world of man and nature, nothing is permanent and nothing is safe. Humans, plants and animals have cross-pollinated; they have merged, evolved and adopted different features from each other. Objects acquire pathos and empathy while the decomposition of material things reflects the world in flux.

Mister Finch’s Upcycled Fairy Tale Objects

Mister Finch - Sculpture

Mister Finch - Sculpture Mister Finch - Sculpture

Mister Finch - Sculpture

Artist Mister Finch is a seamster, dollmaker, and reclaimer of lost souls. He works in discarded trinkets and found objects, cobbling them together into sculptures and models from a strange and much more wondrous place. “Scraps of thread, fabric and paper are stitched and pulled into fairytale creatures looking for new owners and worlds to inhabit,” the splashpage to his webpage proclaims. “They hide in the woods, behind masks, some have died along the way and are buried under spoon lockets.”

For inspiration, Mister Finch turns to nature and his native British folklore. “British folklore is also so beautifully rich in fabulous stories and warnings and never ceases to be at the heart of what I make,” he says. “Shape shifting witches, moon gazing hares and a smartly dressed devil ready to invite you to stray from the path.” The fantastical touch of myth and fairy tale can be seen in the inviting curl of pristine pastel toadstools and creatures that are half fox, half human.

By all appearances, the materials of his art have been truly transformed from their former life in this world, becoming something magical along the way. Of his choice to recycle, Mister finch says: “It’s a joy to hunt for things for my work… the lost, found and forgotten all have places in what I make. Most of my pieces use recycled materials, not only as an ethical statement, but I believe they add more authenticity and charm. A story sewn in, woven in.” (via This Is Colossal)