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Julia Peirone Photographs Teenagers Awkwardly In Mid-Sentence

julia_peirone7 julia_peirone1 julia_peirone4 julia_peirone5If you’ve ever paused a movie when a character is in mid sentence, you’ve probably encountered some unflattering-looking pauses. Photographer Julia Peirone‘s series More Than Violet is comprised of these moments. Young female subjects are caught rolling their eyes, twirling their hair, and playing with their jewelry, all with faces contorted in conversation.  The images are simultaneously awkward and amusing as we see teenage girls acting in a stereotypical fashion.

To achieve these small moments, Peirone shot hundreds of frames and selected ones that signify a not-a-child but not-a-woman moment. Their clothing, hairstyles, and colorful choice in makeup show their youth. It’s also their mannerisms that give their age away, where they are trying to act confident but are still in the dreaded teenager phase where you look younger than you mentally feel.

More Than Violet is a revealing series of portraiture that captures the uncertainty and uncomfortableness of being looked at and getting your picture taken. Considering that we are so defined by our peer group, these photos offer a truthful look at how we navigate between trying to find our true selves and the self that is “cool.” (Via Feature Shoot)

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Blödes Orchester

Arranged like a symphony orchestra, approximately 200 antique vacuums, mixers and washers are transformed into musical instruments. They form an ensemble that the conductor, harpsichordist and composer Michael Petermann, alias weiserrausch.de, has now completed after eight years of preparation: The Stupid Orchestra.

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Indoor Clouds Created Tetsuo Kondo Architects

Tetsuo Kondo Architecture indoor clouds

Tetsuo Kondo Architecture indoor clouds

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The architectural firm Tetsuo Kondo Architects makes creative use of a unique material: clouds.  They carefully manipulate the humidity and temperature in buildings to create indoor clouds.  This eventually creates three distinct layers within the room with actual clouds gathering in the middle.  The firm uses the space to allow visitors to experience the cloud from below, within, and above.  In a way clouds are architectural components of the natural world that serve several practical purposes.  Tetsuo Kondo Architects pull these clouds inside not only as a strange material, but also as a symbol of the relationship between architecture and the surrounding environment. (Via Collabcubed)

Garth and Pierre’s Geometric Vintage Food

Garth and Pierre are an artistic team based out of Washington state, for their series MENU they appropriated nostalgic imagery of restaurants, kitchens, and table settings to explore the perceptions and politics surrounding food. The artists use geometric shapes cut into the image by hand, leaving the viewer with a lace-like grid of highly graphic saturated colors that allude to a romanticized era that has long since passed.

The Wonderfully Disturbing Work Of Geneviève Santerre (NSFW)

Geneviève Santerre

Geneviève Santerre 1

Geneviève Santerre 3

French artist Geneviève Santerre‘s body of work is, well, about the body. Explicitly erotic, her work is shocking and provocative. It speaks to central concerns about women’s bodies and sexuality in general. From human-animal-creature genital hybrid sculptures to bronze cast vaginas to a pair of discharge-soaked underwear hand stitched with the words “shit happens” to a tangled and suspended speculum to a performance piece wherein she wears a Niqab adorned with silicon vaginal molds, Santerre is by no means subtle. Her work is direct and compelling, challenging the viewer with something powerfully resonant yet potentially disturbing. Santerre pushes boundaries, asking us to reflect on recontextualized sexual images.

Santerre explains in her statement, “Belonging to a generation that is supposedly open sexually, I wonder why this jubilation is considered taboo. Despite some improvements since the feminist movement in the 1960’s, contemporary society remains patriarchal and regards women as objects, while frowning upon sexually open women. 

Atomic Bomb Tests Recreated in Fictional Photo Series

As part of our ongoing partnership with Feature Shoot, Beautiful/Decay is sharing  Alison Zavos’ piece on photographer Clay Lipsky.

“I was raised during the height of the Cold War, when the threat of nuclear war loomed between two superpowers. The dramatized depictions in TV and film of such an apocalyptic demise both intrigued and scared me as a child. Yet the actual historical record of the atomic age was full of antiquated, black and white images that seemed dated and a world away.

This series, Atomic Overlook, recontextualizes a legacy of atomic tests in order to keep the reality of our post-atomic era fresh and omnipresent. It also speaks to the current state of the world and the voyeuristic culture we live in.

Imagine if the advent of the atomic era occurred during today’s information age. Tourists would gather to view bomb tests, at the “safe” distances used in the 1950’s, and share the resulting cell phone photos online. Broadcast media would regurgitate such visual fodder ad nauseum, bringing new levels of desensitization.

The threat of atomic weapons is as great as ever, but it is a hidden specter. Nuclear proliferation has gained even more obscurity through the “rogue” factions that can now possess them. Meanwhile America’s stockpile of weapons continues to be modernized and will probably never cease to exist. I can only hope that mankind will never again suffer the wrath of such a destructive force, but it is clear that the world would not hesitate to watch.”

Clay Lipsky is a fine art photographer & graphic designer based in Los Angeles. His photos have been exhibited in various group shows, including those at the Annenberg Space for Photography, MOPLA, Pink Art Fair Seoul, PhotoPlace and Impossible Project NYC.

A Sidewalk Transformed Into A Waterbed

La ville molle (part III) from Raum Raum on Vimeo.

Ever wonder what would happen if the ground you’re used to walking on had the consistency of a waterbed? Well French artist collective Raum has and decided to create a pavement that wiggles, waves and reacts to movement much liked the beloved 80’s bedroom staple, the waterbed. Collaborating with the National Art School of Bourges and the FRAC Centre, a slice of pavement-like material was filled with water on a regular street transforming the mundane patch of land into a fluid wonderland where every step meets not so stable reaction. The project, called “La Ville Molle” (The Soft City) questions the stability of the city and it’s ability to change and accommodate motion and evolution. We’re not sure if the world is ready for endless sidewalks filled with water just yet but this sure does look like a fun project that makes you rethink your environment and the permanent nature of the stable ground that we all take for granted.

Watch a video of the fluid “La Ville Molle” in action above and watch a short “making of” video after the jump to see how you can make your very own waterbed sidewalk! (via)