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Inbai Kim

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Korean artist Inbai Kim works from countless drawings to create these incredibly simple, yet haunting sculptures. He takes it all down to basics, keeps it surprisingly simple. No color, simple shapes, and pencil as main mark-making – yet riveting with voices.

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Todd Baxter’s Stylishly Retro Sci-Fi Utopias

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Multimedia artist Todd Baxter has created a retro futuristic image series inspired by narratives of science fiction utopia. Long fascinated with the technology and physics of the Space Race era, with “Project Astoria: Test 01,” Baxter tells a story that revolves around the experiences of children growing up in a an Earth-like world that has recently been colonized. Baxter’s wife, Aubrey Videtto, is writing the story that the two created together. They hope to collaborate with other artists for the project, including a graphic novelist and musician, to further execute their concepts and designs.  Of this project, Baxter writes, “With Project Astoria, I wanted to play with that childlike hopefulness — that anticipation of humans finally mastering our existence and our technology. Especially as we were reaching such new and magical realities as landing on the moon, the late 60s was the perfect period, in my mind, to add in this alternate history where we all get together and say, ‘Hey! We could go colonize this other Earth-like place and really do it right this time. It could be perfect. Utopia!’ Of course, it doesn’t go perfectly, which is good. Otherwise, it wouldn’t make for a very fun story.”

Baxter’s process is quite involved, but it starts with him pulling out sketches for ideas he’s had. He then browses the images on his computer for environment and landscape images he’s shot, and begins to weave together these environments with Photoshop. Baxter then plans the next elements based on these general compositions, producing photo shoots of his subjects that he continues to compose and retouch with Videtto until each image is fully realized. The result is a playful narrative with an almost kitschy aesthetic, evocative of the likes of Wes Anderson. (via behance and bleek magazine)

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Visceral Sexually Charged Paintings From Brett Reichman

Brett Reichman has been pursuing an increasingly sexually charged direction with his painting. It’s clear that his subject matter is an important aspect of his work. But just as important is how visceral this stuff is. I get the feeling that Reichman’s skill with a brush allows him to communicate any message that pleases him, no matter what the content might be. This looks like one of those cases where you especially have to see a work in person to fully experience it. Brett Reichman is based in San Francisco.

Smif N Wessun & Pete Rock: Monumental Experience

Legendary producer Pete Rock & Smif N Wessun, acclaimed hip hop artists who have previously gained fame from their Dah Shining & The Rude Awakening albums have joined forces for a MONUMENTAL album. Pete Rock has provided the entire production on the album, as well as vocals including on the title track MONUMENTAL. The album features their colleagues in the foundation of hip hop music including artists like: Raekwon, Sean Price, Buckshot, Freeway, Top Dog of Boot Camp Clik, Bun B, & Jahdan.

In collaboration with the release, New York based photographer Fubz, documented the entire recording process. Fubz has been shooting photographs since 1998 with his work featured by notable clients & magazines and record labels such as: Warner Bros., Rostrum Records, Antenna Magazine and The Source.This collaborative release embodies the MONUMENTAL process of creating this album and process of music within the ever changing and growing hip hop community.

Photographer Ellie Davies Creates Mystical Scenes That Explore Our Relationships With The Forest

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For photographer Ellie Davies, the forest is her studio. Her images are an immersive mix of realism and heightened fantasy. In a mossy clearing, for example, galaxies have been interposed with the landscape like clouds of will-o’-the-wisps, while elsewhere, stars resembling flaxen particles drift down in a column, illuminated by the sunlight. Her landscapes are not only places of mysticism and beauty, but of darkness, as well. Fog and clouds drift amongst the trees like ghostly breaths expelled from the twisted, bronchiole-like branches. In one particularly haunting photo from Between the Trees Triptych (2014), skeletal trees flank a spectral cluster of mist.

Whether glowing bright or cast in shadow, all of Davies’ images reveal a reverence for the forest, as well as her intimate understanding of the way such landscapes have manifested themselves in our cultural imaginations. As she writes in her Artist’s Statement:

“UK forests have been shaped by human processes over thousands of years. […] As such, the forest represents the confluence of nature and culture, of natural landscape and human activity. Forests are potent symbols in folklore, fairy tale and myth, places of enchantment and magic as well as of danger and mystery. In recent cultural history they have come to be associated with psychological states relating to the unconscious.”

And it is true; all of these cultural legends, practices, and traditions have made the forest — indeed, “nature,” as a concept  — a construction, a story we tell ourselves to try and understand our individual connection with it. We imagine the woods as a symbolic place of “elsewhere” and “otherness,” and this cognitive distancing allows us to romanticize it, fear it, and/or exploit it.

Davies wants to confront us with these fictions “by making a variety of temporary and non-invasive interventions in the forest, which place the viewer in the gap between reality and fantasy” (Source). She creates her scenes in what she calls “small acts of engagement [that] respond to the landscape” — she builds things, creates pools of light, incorporates craft materials such as paint and wool. As I read it, the images have several effects. They resonate with our fantasies about the forest, but at the same time, we recognize their construction, which helps us to perceive that our cultural relationships to the forests of the real world are also constructed. In unveiling such narratives, Davies’ work encourages a more ethical connection to the woods: we recognize “reality” as a series of stories that have been told to us, we sense that we are not truly separate from what we call “nature,” and we accept that we can never fully understand it — an acknowledgment that fosters both respect and peaceful coexistence.

Visit Davies’ website, Twitter, and Facebook page and immersive yourself in more of her stunning landscapes. (Via Art Fucks Me)

Roger Weiss’ Photographs Distort The Objectification Of Women

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Roger Weiss is a Swiss-born photographer educated at the Accademia di Brera, in Milan. His fashion and fine art photography displays an obsession with the human form. Weiss teases sensuality and subversive themes from his subjects, flaunting them in evocative ways to touch on issues of the objectification of women.

Human Dilations is a study in the feminine form and foray into the subject of beauty and it’s stereotypes. A woman is often boiled down info a series of visual queues that objectify and define her. This project studies whether each form—in it’s distortion and elation—is a physical whole, or simply an object.

“Human Dilatations does not fear the marks of frailness of the body and its imperfections,” said Weiss. “But rather, encourages the female image to appear as a whole: a shape by itself, in a game of distortions that allows one to differently relate to the image, entirely detached from the stereotypical and hypocritical notion of beauty.” (via savage)

View other series by Roger Weiss here.

Jon Boam’s Muted Sci-Fi Illustration

 

Jon Boam is an illustrator living and working in the UK. He works in a nice, muted palette which he applies in flat vectors to sci-fi line work. I especially like how repetitious some of his stuff is. It looks like he doesn’t easily become bored with drawing one robot after another. And I’m definitely not bored either. The comics influence in Boam’s work is fairly evident, but not heavy handed, which is always nice to see. Now you know what your work would look like if you never stopped doodling in your 3rd grade Arithmetic notes. 

Idan Friedman’s Ordinary People & Disposable Objects

Idan Friedman creates portraits of everyday people embossed by hand on disposable tin trays. However this series reminds me of stories you hear about someone seeing the popes image on a moldy slice of bread.