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Myriam Dion Cuts And Slices Newspapers Into Beautifully Intricate Patterns

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A myriad of cut-out patterns invading a newspaper layout. Myriam Dion creates intricate motifs using a scalpel and newspapers she chooses according to their images. This French-Canadian talented student has already been acclaimed for her work. The art pieces she designs are airy reconstructed poems.

Myriam Dion picks front covers from the Herald Tribune, Le Devoir, Cape Cod Times or FT Weekend and selects images which speaks to her. She then creates negative space by hand cutting minuscule patterns. The entire page is cut-out. Generating a halo of waves and starbursts. The ornaments she designs at the edges and around the original shape of the newspaper mimic Arabic patterns and add fantasy to the layout.

The artist has invented her own organic way of transforming a simple medium into an art piece. By cutting and perforating the thin and fragile papers, Myriam Dion is making the rendering even more delicate than it originally was. The colors, thanks to the placement of the cut-outs, twirl and whirl sporadically on the surface.
The pieces, placed on a white background and revealing the negative spaces are treasures meant to be contemplated and used as a mean for evasion. (Via The Jealous Curator)

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Interactive Sculpture That Makes Charcoal Drawings

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Karina Smigla-Bobinski sculpture3

Artist Karina Smigla-Bobinski in a way treats her sculpture like a living creature.  The piece titled (or maybe named) ADA is a large ball inflated with helium and covered in charcoal pegs.  Visitors are encouraged to interact, even play with the ball thus leaving marks on the walls, floor, and ceiling of the room.  The artist considers the piece not only a sculpture, but really a self-creating artwork.  ADA’s shape even resembles a cell or virus emphasizing the idea of the sculpture creating on its own (with some help from visitors, of course).

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Qiu Minye Captures Light And Time Standing Still In These Glowing Photographs

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In his new show “My GodQiu Minye presents us with a new way of seeing. Well, he at least offers us a new way of experiencing objects and the recording of those 3-dimensional things with photography. By painting with light, Minye has suggested different forms of objects that could be real, and then photographed them, resulting in haunting, iridescent, airy images. Whether it is an outline of several figures huddled together watching something in the distance, or an ambiguous geological shape, mythological creatures or floating forms of babies, these snapshots all belong to another space and time.

Minye’s playful images all have a gracefulness to them, and more than most photographs seem to have successfully frozen a moment in time. By removing any fussy details (whether it is light, shadow or color) that may anchor an object in the mundane, he has elevated the idea of the object/subject to something majestic and mystical. The fish for example seems to spitting sparks of fire and is caught in an ethereal state – in a way we don’t see our everyday fish. Minye has managed to capture some sort of life force or see-able movable energy and it is a very calming thing to witness. He has a very existential approach to his art. He poses numerous questions when speaking about his past photographic projects:

What part of humanity is lost in time? How can we transform these moments into eternity? There are always two worlds, the world of yesteryear that has collapsed and the real world. Here, it is to travel between the two. (Source)

Minye seems to be coercing a particular response out of his audience – suggesting we look at the things surrounding us in an abstract, philosophical way – where it’s more about the idea of the thing rather than the tangibility of it. (Via Designboom)

Tim Flach’s incredible Photographs of Dogs

Everyone love a cute photo of a dog but London based Tim Flach’s dog photographs show mans best friend in a completely new light. Bringing the viewer into close-up proximity with their animal subjects, painstakingly lit, carefully cropped for maximum graphic impact and animated by telling gestures, these photographs place us in an intimate relationship with their protagonists. They are far removed from wildlife photography’s documentary images of animals observed in their natural habitat. In fact, the treatment accorded to these particular creatures is not dissimilar from close encounters with individuals that are the stuff of human portraiture.

Insects Printed On Transparencies Seem To Fly Right Off The Wall

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Alan Bur Johnson installation7

Artist Alan Bur Johnson natural motifs often.  However, this may be his work at its most creepy.  Johnson’s Progeny series begins with photographs of winged insects.  The photographs are transferred to transparencies and affixed to the wall using insect pins.  Progeny allows viewers to inspect the insects up close, afford creatures we’d otherwise dispose of more time, and give some thought to taxonomy, the exercise of classification.  Interestingly his statement says in part:

“Whether an image, memory or specimen, each is meticulously dissected, altered and restructured. Referencing physical structures and the pulse of living cycles, his work documents fleeting occurrences, which typically transpire unnoticed.”

Lu Xinjian Creates A Neon Aerial Map Of Shanghai Using Google Earth

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Lu Xinjian

Lu Xinjian

Chinese artist Lu Xinjian has been inspired by maps and cities for years, often collected in his increasingly large-scale acrylic on canvas series City DNA. But his newest work City Light expands on these inspirations, taking the flat abstractions and mounting them onto the wall with neon.

Using Google Earth images of the artist’s current home, the sprawling metropolis of Shanghai, Xinjian renders the map loosely in his abstract style. The resulting plans are rendered in neon on a solid black background, and run on a flash program which controls the timing of each area’s lines being illuminated. Starting with a small, centrally-located blue square, the rest of the  surrounding area follows, until the entire piece is lit. Representing the rapid growth of the modern metropolis, the network of neon light tubes takes the language of city communication and visually abstracts the idea of rapid expansion. (via alwaysinstudio and designboom)

Oil Paintings Examine The Freedom To Connect, Rebel, And Destruct

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Living and working in Budapest, Alexander Tinei originally hails from Caushani, Moldova, and his work seems to reflect the historical and current climate of these two places– a certain transition into post communism mainstream. That said, however, I would avoid labeling his work as something political. It feels more personal or social, examining identity as it relates or responds to its fluid environment. The darkness in each image is a certain type of natural blooming that slowly corrodes. Emphasis is not on reckless destruction alone, but the cultivation and freedom to pursue it.

Beautiful/Decay At LA Print: 2 This Saturday!

This Saturday Beautiful/Decay will be taking part in L.A. Print: Edition 2, the second annual showcase of Los Angeles printmakers, dealers, galleries, and non-profits focusing on current trends in printmaking and publishing. Guests are invited to connect directly with artists, curators, printers, and dealers to learn more about the production and collection of
fine art prints and editions.

Presentations and artist talks throughout the day illuminate the creativity and process behind printmaking. With a variety of affordable prints available, it is perfect for those looking to build their own collection or to purchase special gifts for the holidays.

LACMA West
Level 5
Free and open to the public
For more information: [email protected] or 323 857-6558