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Hirotoshi Itoh’s Humorous Stone Sculptures

Tokyo based sculptor Hirotoshi Itoh learned the art of stone carving through his family business of Stonemasons. However he take the ancient art  and puts a modern and humorous twist to it using the found stones natural forms to create clever images that make you question the history of the material and laugh out loud all at once. (via)

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Thomas Poulsom’s Birds Made of Legos

 

Thomas Poulsom of Bristol, UK has a really nice flickr account full of creative creations using legos. The legos almost lend a really cool, pixelated quality to the 3-dimensional, playful works. Probably the best of the bunch are his series of birds. He’s done birds native to Britain and a tropical bird series as well. I think the reason why these come off so well is how life-like they are. Definitely not you average plastic bird. (via)

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Sam Vanallemeersch- Two Styles, One Artist

Antwerp-based Sam Vanallemeersch has that rare ability to work in two distinct styles that feed and grow off of each other’s strengths. His one style, full of nuanced detail and dense atmospheres, can entertain the eye endlessly. His other style, which relies on simplified forms that tend to become entangled in a puzzle piece manner is equally as effective. Consistent throughout is an accessible body of work that retains all integrity no matter what approach he takes. His unstoppable production is the reason he has two separate websites packed to the gills, here and there. Jaw-droops.

Alex Cornell

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San Francisco based Alex Cornell has a track record of pursued professions that makes most feel like underachievers; he is a graphic designer, musician, and dabbles in photography.  These collection of posters are reminiscent of 40’s atomic bomb informational posters with a hint of contemporary influence.  His organization of graphic elements is very clean and eye pleasing.

Reiner Hansen’s Paintings Of Multiple Personalities

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In artist Reiner Hansen’s series Facial Fallout, she paints self portraits that each depict a different persona. In some, she plays a character, like a reality star or the girl next door. In others, it’s another version of who she already is, but with a different hair style, skin sunburnt, and more. All of these are a departure of her true identity, which itself is fleeting and malleable based on who she was trying to be. Hansen explains:

Each is based on, or rather mapped onto, my own features and characteristics. My self image is re-conceived as these other women, who live in a world entirely different from my own. There is a process of transformation into involuntarily ‘stereotyped’ notions of who these people are or might be, a sort of method acting in painted form, leaving a history of performance in each image. Simultaneously a game that is playful as well as a meditative speculation on a fabricated ‘other life’, these images are partly about investigating the idea of ‘escape,’ not just away from ‘the self’ and into anonymity, but also away from the art historical traditions of the self portrait and its established practice of depicting the artist. Instead, concealing my self behind imagined personas, I attempt to escape identification.

These portraits are humorous, and part of the joy of looking at Hansen’s work is finding glimpses of her true self within all of these paintings.

Martin Ouellette’s Decaying Objects

Martin Ouellete’s painting s are inspired by macro photographs of decaying objects found within the urban landscape; details of worn out magazines, wires, rusted nails or wooden poles layered with staples and torn up paper. These mass-produced items are used to serve a momentary purpose then left to decay in their natural surroundings.

Sneak Peak: Jeremy Mora @ Zuam Projects

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Most people know Jeremy Mora via his gallery space POV Evolving but Jeremy is also an amazing sculptor. He recently headed to Lisboa, Portugal for a “larger than life” show at Zaum Projects featuring hundreds of sculptures.

Jeremy primarily works in sculpture creating miniature worlds out of everyday debris. Each piece is like a small planet, inhabiting tiny people going about their everyday life in a world built out of styrofoam, paint, and wood.

Congrats on a great show Jeremy! Wish I could have seen it in person.

Literally Balling: Victor Solomon Transforms Basketball Backboards Into Delicate Stained Glass

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Some may say basketball is their religion. Well, if you worship the game, then these stained glass basketball backboards might be right up your alley. Like stained glass windows that depict religious icons in churches and cathedrals, artist Victor Solomon places breathtaking and beautiful stained glass windows in place of basketball backboards. These are not likely to be used at any court that you’ve ever seen, as they are likely to shatter into a thousand pieces. Each piece is ornamented in luxurious materials and gems, including the basketball goal’s net and rim. This series, cleverly titled Literally Balling, embodies the lavish lifestyle and luxury that NBA all-stars. These superstars being like royalty, Victor Solomon adds an age old, delicate art to their domain.

Solomon hand assembles these brilliant and intricate creations in the timeless beauty of the Tiffany Style. What is ironic about this work is that although hypnotizing to look at, none of the remarkable basketball goals are by any means functional. They are as fragile and as easily broken as success and wealth. If a basketball player gets injured, they can be done with playing the game forever. Their career could be over. Solomon’s goals embody this brilliance, power, and delicateness that a life in the sports industry can have. If you want to see more of Victor Solomon’s amazing work, you can see more of his work here.