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Nicolas Deshayes’ Vaccum-Formed Plastic Sculptures

Nicolas Deshayes lives and works in France. He utilizes vacuum-formed plastic, anodized aluminum, and polystyrene to create textured abstractions. His compositions remain static until an area is covered in the formed plastic, the work then resembles flowing color fields. Like glimpses into another dimension his sculptures ebb and flow as colors swirl around the viewer.

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Maja Daniels’ Touching Series On Alzheimer’s Patients

Maja Daniels- Photography Maja Daniels- Photography Maja Daniels- PhotographyMaja Daniels- PhotographyPhotographer Maja Daniels is studying aging. Her photo series “Into Oblivion,” shows the raw and fragile lives of those living in an Alzheimer’s ward. Working in a geriatric unit in France, the Swedish photographer Daniels spent three years documenting life for the residents. Those suffering from Alzheimer’s were kept in a locked ward as a protective precaution due to their innate tendencies to wander and get lost.

“This series documents not only the day-to-day challenges in an often ignored sector, but also the wider implications of the growing populations of elderly in modern society as an increasing life span has coincided with the breakdown of the family unit. These aspects have caused a growing disregard for the elderly, swept aside by a commercially driven, youth-obsessed culture. As growing old and being dependent is more taboo than ever, the geriatric institution hides our elders away, safely out of sight.”

Children do not care for their parents as they once did, and national healthcare often fails to meet the needs of those who need it. Bringing the viewer into the heart of this lifestyle, Daniels is hoping to motivate us to view our own personal role within healthcare policy:

“While giving a vision about what living with Alzheimer’s in an institution might mean, I want to motivate people to think about current care policies and the effects it can have on somebody’s life. This project gives a rare insight to a part of the modern geriatric institution. It attempts to create a discussion about our institutionalized, modern way of living as well as the use of confinement as an aspect of care.”

(Excerpt from Source)

Kathryn Andrews: High Art Meets The Readymade

Kathryn Andrews

Kathryn Andrews Kathryn Andrews Kathryn Andrews

Kathryn Andrews explores issues relating to performance, presentation and material.  Juxtaposing the legacies of pop art and minimalism, Andrews’ works direct a viewer to consider the way subjectivity is constructed in contemporary culture.  In the process, Andrews’ works manage to subvert the very art historical categories they reference.  Using fabricated forms alongside readymade objects sourced from the likes of prop shops, memorabilia stores or party supply outlets Andrews’ pieces become a powerful contrast between high art and pseudo-kitsch—shiny, serious mirrored surfaces reflect colorful, strange yet common objects.  In the reflection the viewer sees himself, thus becoming part of the narrative and generation of information and understanding.

Entertaining similar interests in her two-person exhibition with fellow Los Angeles artist, Alex Israel, at Gagosian in Rome, Andrews and Israel present works that explore a dialogue about specifically the readymade.  The show is up through March 14 and you can see images here.

EE Belanger’s Tangled Humans

EE Belanger has captivated us with magnificent drawings that intertwine human and animal species. This entanglement of man/wild showcases the age old struggle… this time in artistic splendor.

Michelle Morin’s Natural World

Michelle Morin’s works are beautifully detailed natural scenes depicting flora and fauna. Each of her pieces is full of painted texture, and puts an earthy calm spin on classical animal paintings. As a once professional gardener, she has a unique insight into her subject matter. I think it makes all the difference, don’t you?

Caro Suerkemper

Caro Suerkemper1

Caro Suerkemper’s graceless ladies (you know who I am) are somehow classical and vulgar at the same time- perhaps because she uses mediums typically reserved for refined culture or antiquities, such as fine china and delicate gouache wash paintings to convey her gals, usually in awkward stages of self or imposed bondage.

Get Lost In This Massive 186 Ton Steel Labyrinth In Belgium

Gijs Van Vaerenbergh - labyrinth Gijs Van Vaerenbergh - labyrinth Gijs Van Vaerenbergh - labyrinth Gijs Van Vaerenbergh - labyrinth

Architecture duo known as Gijs Van Vaerenbergh have installed 186 tons of 5mm thick steel walls in Genk, Belgium, creating a dense labyrinth for visitors to navigate their way through. The dense maze is made from walls 5 meters high and creates an impressive structure of many corridors and industrial looking alleyways. The pathways and shapes of the labyrinth aren’t only rectangular, or flat either. The pair have cut out cylindrical and spherical shapes and voids in the maze, allowing for some very strange view points. The pair describe their project a bit more:

A series of Boolean transformations create spaces and perspectives that reinterpret the traditional Labyrinth is a sculptural installation that focuses on the experience of space. These Boolean transformations convert the walk through the labyrinth into a sequence of spatial and sculptural experiences. At the same time, the cutouts function as ‘frames’ to the labyrinth. Seen from some certain perspectives, the cut-outs are fragmentary, whereas from other viewpoints the entire cut-out shape is unveiled. (Source)

The pair are known for their ambitious, eye catching public installations and like to create architecture that reacts to or compliments the environment it is placed in. The particular installation is part of the 10th anniversary celebrations at the c-mine Arts Center which now stands where a coal mine once did. Gijs Van Vaerenbergh have taken ideas of the mine shafts below the surface and transferred them into their ideas for the labyrinth. They go on to say:

Furthermore, the production and construction processes remain visible in the final design. Visitors who ascend the mine shafts nearby, can view the labyrinth as a materialised floor plan and sculptural whole – a perspective that runs against what a labyrinth should do: conceal itself. (Source)

(Via Design Boom)