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Evan Baden Takes Us Behind The Scenes Of The World Of Sexting

Evan Baden - PhotographyEvan Baden - PhotographyEvan Baden - Photography

Chicago-based photographer Evan Baden has captures the world of adolescent sexting in his series cleverly titled Technically Intimate. The word “sexting” was officially added to the dictionary in 2012—that is how common this word and action is. Selfies and nudes being sent back and forth to people via smart phones has become commonplace. The fact of the matter is, these explicit photos never truly disappear. Evan Baden shines light on the privacy issues at hand concerning digitally sent photos, especially ones that are meant to be intimate or private. Interestingly enough, the title of this series, Technically Intimate, refers to a level of intimacy that is perhaps supposed to be felt between the people doing the sharing of sexual photos. Although the intention of these photos may have started out as intimate between two lovers, they remain forever in the public sphere. Therefore, no intimacy can be achieved.

Evan Baden starts each photograph with an image from real life, found online. He then hires a model to pose in a similar way, in a similarly adolescent environment. The final result is a re-imagined version of the original photos that has been shared online, accessible for anyone to see. In this uncomfortably close series, we are a fly on the wall, looking into a both private and public situation. For more amazing photography with an eye on pop-culture and its digitalization, Evan Baden is in an exhibition that will be on view September 19th until January 17th at the NRW-Forum Düsseldorf Contemporary Culture Center titled Ego Update: The Future of the Digital Identity.

Baden delves deeper into his intriguing series explaining this incredibly relevant topic. (via FeatureShoot)

“The poses in my images emphasize the repetitiveness of the sexual images that pervade our society while the rooms that the scenes are staged in and the ages of the room’s occupant clash with those highly sexualized poses, causing an unease in the viewing of those pictured and reminding the viewer that with every leap we take in technology and convenience there is an equally deep crevasse into which we can fall.”

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Goodbye Super Intern Mike “The Stache” Hahn

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You may be wondering if we here at Beautiful/Decay are mustache friendly. Why yes, yes we are. Super Intern Mike Hahn not only sported an irreverently dashing upper lip duster during his entire stay here at Beautiful/Decay, but graced us with tawdry tales of his mustachioed musings all while helping us at the office here with the..how you say…joie de vivre pictured above! Yes, he really wore button downs, pastel argyle sweater vests, candy striper twill Bermuda summer shorts, Dockers boating shoes and an American flag cape each day to work! Thank you for all your hard work here Mike, we will miss you as clean shaven face misses the warmth of a well manicured ‘stache in the dead of a Minnesota winter! Check out Mike’s artwork after the jump or at his website, whoismoch.com.

Photographer Gives Roadkill Proper Burial Ceremonies

Fox, from the series At Rest

Owl, from the series At Rest

Pheasant, from the series At Rest

Emma Kisiel‘s series of photographs At Rest is as intriguing as it is simple.  Kisiel happens upon animals that have died, typically roadkill, and sparsely decorates the site.  Simply by placing stones and flowers around the carcass, Kisiel draws attention and returns a certain dignity to each animal.  Typically these animals are only seen from inside a car as it momentarily passes.  Kisiel says of her interaction with the animals in the series:

“They are happened upon, visited with, remembered, and left to return to nature.”  [via]

Evan Roth’s Ink Fingerprint Paintings Track Touchscreen Routines

Evan Roth - ink

Evan Roth - ink

Evan Roth - ink

Evan Roth - ink

American artist Evan Roth is no stranger to subverting digital culture into progressive art. In the past, Roth has developed a wall of gifs for Occupy the Internet and hacked the internet cache to create self-portraits, both of which fit neatly into his artist statement of “visualizing and archiving culture through unintended uses of technologies”. Drawing inspiration from hacker culture and philosophy, Roth helped found the Graffiti Research Lab, which merges graffiti with technology via projectile LEDs, which he used to famously tag the Brooklyn Bridge in 2008. For his Multi-Touch Paintings series, Roth tapped quite literally into a newly universal habit among people fully plugged into the digital era: that of using touchscreen devices. Created by “performing routine tasks on milt-touch hand held computing devices,” Roth used tracing paper and an ink pad to turn impressions of each finger swipe into stark paintings.

Each of Roth’s ink paintings are named after the task they’re depicting, from an entire wall of levels from Angry Birds to Twitter and e-mail check-ins. By turning mundane procedures we make on a day to day basis on our phones and tablets into textural studies, Roth blurs the line between the corporeal and the digital. One can’t help but be reminded of fingerprinting for identification when looking at the paintings, drawing a connection between the all-encompassing nature of technology in modern society and the lasting effects that may hold over our identities in the future. With iPhones that now literally use your fingerprint to access the device, it seems as though Roth’s paintings are even more prescient now than they were when he first premiered them in 2011.

Front Forty Profiles No. 1: Mark McGinnis

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Orwell fans may be familiar with the term “Newspeak,” a sort of simplified English that the totalitarian government used to constrict freedom. “Newspeak” works by removing words associated with freedom & rebellion entirely from the language. Graphic artist Mark McGinnis has aimed to remove as many words as possible from his imagery for another reason: to express what our own government often obscures from us through icons. This art book is the first in a series of artist profiles from Front Forty Press.

Forrest Lucero

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Forrest Lucero is a California based designer working in print, typography, media, and apparel.  My favorite works are the series of minimal (and poetic) posters and flyers.

Chen Dao Lee’s Evocative Paintings Of Masked Heros And Wrestling Maidens

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Chen-Dao Lee paints highly stylized pop images that are a kind of Taiwanese version of a Quentin Tarantino neo-noir film. Painted in candyfloss pinks, reds and blues, his work borders on anime, or a kind of twisted superhero comic. His subjects are powerful women (and peculiar men) who have a cynicism, sexuality and also a sickly sweetness about them. Posed together, armed with guns and wearing frilly socks and high heels, or engaged in a semi-erotic masked wrestling fight, Lee’s characters are contemporary individuals, expressing the whole spectrum of emotions.

In his recent series, Lee has shifted from depicting a logical scenario in his paintings to focusing on the figures entanglement to describe emotions or relationships which are ambiguous, embarrassing or even helpless. Beautiful young women and fallen heroes frequently appear in Lee’s works as a symbol of the projection of modern people’s inner contradictions. (Source)

With titles like Cat fight – Love Kick, Boss, Not The Hero Type, Valentine, BFF, Lee embraces a kind of feminism with a dark sense of humor. He paints scenarios loaded with sexual innuendo, but instead of them being erotic, or about power plays, he focuses on ennui. The women (and men) show a lack of enthusiasm and engagement, but rather a nonchalance about what ever is going on around them.

His past series have included paintings of women guiltily carrying loads of fast food, indulgent night life scenes with money being tossed around, strange card nights, groups of men eating sushi off a blow-up doll, and overweight men with bad tan lines wearing cute costume masks. Lee is able to blend sarcasm, skepticism and empathy to create instant modern day classics. (Via Illusion Scene)