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Local Bay Area Artists Seize The Day At Loakal Gallery In Oakland,CA

John-Wentz

John Wentz

JetMartinez

Jet Martinez

Cameron-Thompson

Cameron Thompson

On March 29, 2014 19 artists gathered at Loakal Gallery to live-paint 19 different works that would later be part of Carpe Diem, a 24-hour art show.  Each artist was given a 4′ by 8′ panel and 24 hours to complete their work. The gallery was open to the public all 24 hours of the painting day so that people could engage with the artists and observe them at work.

From street artists to classically trained painters, they all showcased their process in a way that resembled a happening- the idea of the painters’ performance was one of main ingredient is the uniqueness of this show. The artists, challenged to complete a 4′ by 8′ panel within a tight time frame, had the opportunity to perform and, at the same time, engage with spectators. Viewers not only had the chance to observe but actually participate in the process- chance was very much a part of this 24-hour art making extravaganza.

Apart from creating and sharing the process with spectators, the artist were able to engage and work with each other. For many of the artists, art is typically a solo act, done alone in one’s studio, while street artists and muralists like Ian Ross, Hueman and Nite Owl had more experience with being out in the open while creating their work. During the event, the artists involved turned to each other with a more social approach.

Full list of participating artists: Jessica Hess, Ian Ross, Hueman, Reggie Warlock, Chris Granillo, Eddie Colla, Cameron Thompson, Brett Amory, Lisa Pisa, Nite Owl, John Wentz, John Casey, Marcos LaFarga, Jet Martinez, Cannon Dill, Lauren YS, Zoltron, Max Kauffman and Daryll Peirce.

Loakal is located in the Jack London Square district of Oakland and is open 7 days a week to the public. The entire show is on view until April 28,2014. (via Huff Post)

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Diego Arroyo’s Photographic Journey Into Kenya

Photographs so striking, they’re guaranteed to give you pause. That’s what Amsterdam-based art director and photographer Diego Arroyo achieves with a look, camera in-hand. Challenging himself to capture the subtle and the intimate in his images, Arroyo travels the globe – from Kenya to Cambodia – searching out the unique stories of strangers and seeking to catch the essence of a people, a place, a nation. Through his pause-giving photographs, it’s possible to visualize his personal efforts to highlight what is most real, as well as the passion that drives the process. Among his more recent works is a photographic series documenting his time among the Samburu, a semi-nomadic pastoralist people, as well as his visit to Lamu, an island along the northern coast of Kenya. Long after their time, the hauntingly intense stares, gentle smiles, and curiosity-furrowed brows of Kenya’s Samburu and the people of Lamu live on in these beautiful images. See more after the jump, and be sure to check out the photographer’s recent series taken in Cambodia by heading over to his Behance page.

Alva Bernadine Uses Mirrors In The Creation Of Uniquely Provocative Nude Photographs

Alva Bernadine - Photography Alva Bernadine - PhotographyAlva Bernadine - Photography Alva Bernadine - Photography

Alva Bernadine is a British photographer known for his color-saturated, surrealist style and subversive content. Contained within his oeuvre are several series of unconventional nude photographs; from conjoined torsos to uncanny perspectives to disembodied legs and fetishized footwear, his works are story-filled portraits that engage and entice as often as they confound (or even repulse). Inspired by surrealist artists such as Rene Magritte and photographers Cheyco Leidmann and Guy Bourdin, Bernadine’s works contain elements of absurdity mixed with eroticism, glamour, mystery, and oftentimes humor.

This particular series incorporates mirrors to attain Bernadine’s signature stylistic effect. He was inspired to create these images when he bought six small mirrors in a £1 shop. “I have used mirrors before in my work but never in multiples,” Bernadine explained in a statement provided to Beautiful/Decay. “After initially trying to get as many into an image as possible, I then started thinking up different permutations, finally working my way back down to one mirror […]. As the mirrors were so small, you can only reflect a small portion of the body with one, which led me to try to reconstitute a woman with several.”

The results are provocative, to say the least. From playful self-examinations to fragments of orgasmic bliss, the images entice us with a unique — but not wholly transparent — form of voyeurism. We can see the nude models engaged in acts that hover between private intimacy and exhibitionism, but we are not given the whole picture; we are never truly certain of what is occurring in the room behind the camera. This ambiguity heightens the erotic effect by taking some control away from the viewer/voyeur in their engagement with the photos. Speaking of his work generally, Bernadine expresses how he is consistently trying to “produce a sort of unresolved picture, an inconclusive narrative, that the viewer has to finish for [him]” (Source). Thus, instead of passive consumption, Bernadine’s images stimulate the imagination, engaging us on both cognitive and erotic levels.

Bernadine’s work has become deservedly well-recognized over the years. He worked his way up as a self-taught artist and collaborated with magazines. He eventually won the Vogue Sotheby’s Cecil Beaton Award for young photographers for The Fetish, a series of photographs showing a high-heel shoe in a variety of strange contexts. In 2001, Bernadine published Bernadinism: How to Dominate Men and Subjugate Women, which won him the Erotic Photographer of the Year in Britain (2002). Another book, titled Twisted, recently came out in 2014. Visit Bernadine’s website and Facebook page to follow his fascinating, creative, and unconventional work.

Alice Smeets Photographs Modern Witchcraft

Belgian documentary photographer Alice Smeets has traveled the world and covered everything from war to famine. However her series on Witchcraft has blown me away! This series captures the life and practices of the modern witchcraft practitioner by pulling back the veil on this ancient yet taboo tradition. Smeets says about this project:

“Modern Witchcraft is practiced across Europe, the USA and the rest of the Western World. It is extremely diverse; with beliefs that range widely from polytheism to animism, to pantheism and other paradigms. The largest movements of this self-termed Neo-Paganism are Wicca and Druidism; the followers of which call themselves Witches or Druids, sharing beliefs of Magic, Witchcraft and Nature’s Power. They respect their environment and celebrate eight Sabbats in the Wheel of the Year where they praise the divinities of nature. They often hold rituals – called Esbats – on the Full Moon. In part, they return to some of the old Celtic traditions.

While Wicca is a very young religion – formed by Gerald Gardner not more than 50 years ago, its roots are much older than Christianity. It has no relationship to Satanism, which is one of many misconceptions held by the public. Ancient pagan beliefs have begun to make their way into the Neo-Pagan community in many ways, making our spiritual path a very deep one, rooted and grounded in the very earth that supports us. From its origins in England it is now widely spread across Europe, America and the rest of the world. At the present time, Neo-Paganism is a large network of small communities with its own organizations, festivals, magazines, shops, workshops, gatherings and ceremonies. Witches can be found everywhere: in the supermarket, in the streets, as well as in our own neighborhood. And you would not know these Witches unless you were told who they were or were one yourself.”

Yan Copelli

As you all know we have a very active Flickr Creative Pic Pool filled with creative work from all over the world. Yan Copelli is just one of the many talented artists that we found while going through the thousands of images one late night. Yan’s delicately drawn and extra funny illustrations have just the right amount of humor and gross-out visuals for us. Check out his Flickr page and his site and hire him to do your next shirt graphic, put him in your next group show, or even better put down some cold hard cash and add his work to your collection.

Gregg Segal’s Poignant Portraits Of People Surrounded By One Week Of Their Own Trash

Gregg Segal - photography

Gregg Segal - photography Gregg Segal - photography Gregg Segal - photography

Do you know what kind of trash you accumulate over the course of a single week? For California-based photographer Gregg Segal, this question comes with a loaded context: there’s the irrefutable issue of Americans producing more trash than nearly any other country, as well as the large-scale ramifications producing so much waste has on the environment. In his new ongoing series, ‘7 Days of Garbage,’ Segal recruited friends, neighbors, and other acquaintances to compile a week’s worth of their personal garbage and allow him to photograph them lying in it. The photos are provocative, with Segal crafting beaches, bodies of water, and other natural settings to place emphasis on the garbage his participants were willing to bring to him. “Of course, there were some people who edited their stuff. I said, ‘Is this really it?’ I think they didn’t want to include really foul stuff so it was just packaging stuff without the foul garbage. Other people didn’t edit and there were some nasty things that made for a stronger image.”

Segal aimed to include people from different socioeconomic backgrounds, providing for a fascinating display of different kinds of trash. By shooting from an overhead angle, garbage strewn between created natural environments, Segal crafts startlingly personal portraits that are oddly still detached, conveying a more poignant message lying underneath. “Obviously, the series is guiding people toward a confrontation with the excess that’s part of their lives. I’m hoping they recognize a lot of the garbage they produce is unnecessary,” he said. “It’s not necessarily their fault. We’re just cogs in a machine and you’re not culpable really but at the same time you are because you’re not doing anything, you’re not making any effort. There are some little steps you can take to lessen the amount of waste you produce.” (via Slate)

Jules Julien

Jules Julien’s portfolio is full of beautifully rendered digital illustrations, playful typography, and a couple mural and poster campaigns for good measure.