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Maarit Hohteri

Maarit Hohteri’s photographs document the fleeting moments that she spends with and around her family and friends. By photographing her life she’s attempting to make a seemingly fractured life into a whole; a story with a past, present and future.

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Jamie Salmon

Jamie Salmon’s hyper realistic sculpture capture every wrinkle, vein, and hair with uncanny realism and attention to detail.

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Stefan Fürtbauer’s Viennese Fast Food Stops

Stefan Fürtbauer’s Eiterquellen project is an ongoing series of photographs documenting the Viennese diners and fast food culture. Most of the time these diners are isolated islands of food with their own unique look and style, resisting the global look (and probably taste) of the fast food chains that most of us are familiar with.

Tony Orrico’s Drawings Test The Limits Of Physical Movement

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Since 2009, Tony Orrico has performed his Penwald drawings. Combining elements found in dance, theater and performance art, it explores repetitive movement for long periods of time, bringing drawing’s motion into peril with human physicality. The idea originates in finding a point when an act becomes more than just motor skills and crosses over into the creative process. In Tony’s case, this leaves an aesthetic mark on physical existence in the form of an abstract drawing.

After graduating with an MFA in Choreography from the University of Iowa, Tony joined Shen Wei and Trisha Brown Dance companies. As a principle, he performed in major cities around the globe, including Sydney Opera House. Both troupes known for an avant garde approach ensured that he was never far away from a serious art practice. When he was ready, this enabled him to use the experience he learned as a dancer and combine it with his passion for drawing. One of his first Penwald performances at Postmasters Gallery, NY in 2009, would set the stage for everything that followed. From there, he received an opportunity to perform at The National Academy Of Sciences in Washington DC, and  was soon taking his “Penwald” series to venues worldwide. He was one of the few selected to reappropriate performances from Marina Ambramovic’s retrospective, “The Artist is present” at New York’s Museum Of Modern Art, an experience he was honored to have.

His newest project, CARBON, further investigates the relationship between material, body and movement.  Again, testing the limits of physical, mental and creative capacity, Tony sleeps in a box of graphite broken off throughout the course of a day, from Mexican pottery bowls. The material is used as a metaphor for life and death. A few recent highlights include performances at The Metz-Pompidou, New Museum, BAM, and solo Exhibits at PPOW Gallery NY, MUAC Mexico and Shoshanna Wayne Gallery Los Angeles.

Photographer Elle Hanley Captures Surreal And Timeless Portraits

Elle Hanley-PhotographyElle Hanley-PhotographyElle Hanley-PhotographyElle Hanley-PhotographyElle Hanley-Photography

Elle Hanley, a fine art photographer based in Seattle, creates captivating characters and dreamy narratives through her portraits. Initially attracted to self-portraiture four years ago, Hanley has since amassed a career in conceptual portraits, surreal photography, and fashion editorials.

Aesthetically, Hanley emphasizes color and plays with texture in her work. Drawing inspiration from nature, her pieces are often shot in outdoor settings and feature humans interacting with their immediate environments. Due to this fascination with the “natural tension that exists between the human form and the space,” most of her work explores the relationship between her models—one of which being herself—and their surroundings. Always seeking to conjure an emotional reaction from the viewer, she strives to create narratives and seeks to capture moments in time. Evoking a sense of fantasy and avoiding indications of specific place or time, her portraits suggest “something vintage and timeless from a thoroughly modern process.”

Hanley’s recent body of work ranges from seemingly traditional, straightforward portraits to surreal depictions of women in dreamlike settings. Beautifully shot and conceptually fascinating, each piece portrays her devotion to maintain both variety and creativity in her practice, and perfectly captures her distinctive style and alluring aesthetic.

Check out Elle Hanley’s work at Axis Gallery in Seattle, Washington through the month of October!

Ave Pildas’ Nostalgic Photographs Capture The Lively Characters Of Hollywood Boulevard During The 1970s

Teenagers Bus Bench -©1974

Bus Bench – Teenagers ©1974

Halloween - Trannies ©1974

Halloween – Trannies ©1974

People on Stars - Sundance Massage ©1973

People on Stars – Sundance Massage ©1973

Halloween - KKK ©1974

Halloween – KKK ©1974

Bus Bench - Jesus ©1974

Bus Bench – Jesus ©1974

In a series of black-and-white photographs taken between the years of 1973 and 1975, Ave Pildas provides a fascinating glimpse into how, over the span of four decades, the streets and people of Hollywood Boulevard have both changed and remained curiously the same. Pildas moved from Ohio to Los Angeles in 1971, when Capitol Records hired him to design album covers and take pictures of talent. After 6 months, Pildas left to begin his own design company called Plug In and embark on his Hollywood Boulevard project.

“This place is incredible,” Pildas said when we spoke over the phone. “People escaping the winter [and] US tourists lean towards the west — and all the nuts roll towards the west as well, stopping short of the ocean in Hollywood.” Intrigued by these people who came seeking adventure (and perhaps fame in movies and music), Pildas began to collect their portraits. “My style is to interact with people,” he said, explaining his approach. He would wait until an unknown person would walk into the light, engage with them, and then request to take their picture. Some people would pose and smile, and others would hold up their hands in rejection. “For the most part, I was treated well,” Pildas said in good humor.

Among the images you will see a whole cast of characters posing excitedly (or reluctantly) for the camera. There are apathetic teenagers at the bus stop, suave fashionistas, a chef, and, rather controversially, two people dressed up as KKK members for Halloween. In comparison to present-day street photography, which favors strong contrasts, Pildas would minimize shadows by shooting on overcast days. The result is a collection of images that are nostalgic as well as beautifully muted and almost surreal in appearance.

While some of the images look a bit dated (such as the cavalier and inappropriate attitudes of the KKK Halloween-goers), they also show how some things haven’t changed. “The costumes have changed,” Pildas observed, referring to how the fashion has inevitably shifted over the decades — but many things persist. He talked about what could still be seen: the Broadway Building, as well as the variety of restaurants, head shops, trashy lingerie stores, Scientologists, and street people hanging out. What has remained fundamentally the same is the adventurous and eclectic spirit that characterizes Hollywood Boulevard.

In an exhibition titled Hollywood Boulevard: The 70s — which opened at Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions (LACE) on July 1st and runs until September 13th — Pildas has compiled an exciting collection of 51 photographs from the series. The images are made from scans of the original negatives, some of which hadn’t been seen in forty years and required repair. By opening the images to the public, Pildas offers a delightful journey into the lively history of Hollywood Boulevard and its people. Check out his website and Facebook page to learn more.

Sisters of the Black Moon Star in Black Mountain

I’m proud to say my witchy sisters & Texan friends, Sisters of the Black Moon, have recently “moonlighted” (in a black sense, of course) as the starry-eyed starring leading ladies in Black Mountain’s new music video, Old Fangs. Like a Nightshade-induced hallucination from a Belladonna dilated third eye, these sultry sirens seduce and induce cosmic visions and beyond.

And, if you love their sartorial sorcery, be sure to check out their website- they hawk their magick wares on an epic eBay store, The talented Miss Alecia Marcum of the coven, as if she isn’t fantastic enough already, also does styling work.

Check out more eye candy of these unbelievable beauties after the jump!

Myriam Dion Cuts And Slices Newspapers Into Beautifully Intricate Patterns

Myriam Dion - Design 15Myriam Dion - Design 14Myriam Dion - Design 13

A myriad of cut-out patterns invading a newspaper layout. Myriam Dion creates intricate motifs using a scalpel and newspapers she chooses according to their images. This French-Canadian talented student has already been acclaimed for her work. The art pieces she designs are airy reconstructed poems.

Myriam Dion picks front covers from the Herald Tribune, Le Devoir, Cape Cod Times or FT Weekend and selects images which speaks to her. She then creates negative space by hand cutting minuscule patterns. The entire page is cut-out. Generating a halo of waves and starbursts. The ornaments she designs at the edges and around the original shape of the newspaper mimic Arabic patterns and add fantasy to the layout.

The artist has invented her own organic way of transforming a simple medium into an art piece. By cutting and perforating the thin and fragile papers, Myriam Dion is making the rendering even more delicate than it originally was. The colors, thanks to the placement of the cut-outs, twirl and whirl sporadically on the surface.
The pieces, placed on a white background and revealing the negative spaces are treasures meant to be contemplated and used as a mean for evasion. (Via The Jealous Curator)