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Artist Collaborates With Bees to Cover Sculptures With Honeycomb

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Aganetha Dyck sculpture1 honeycomb

You could say artist Aganetha Dyck creates her sculptures as much as she fascilitates them.  Dyck uses honeybees to decorate these figurines.  The bees create graceful lines and countours that seem compliment the existing shapes of the figures.  Their honeycomb patterns don’t seem like strange additions but rather enhancements.  Dyck begins her process with figurines, often broken or damaged in some way.  Then collaborating with beekeepers and scientists, bees are allowed to add their distinctive pattern to each small statue.  Dyck describes her process:

“To begin a collaborative project with the honeybees, I choose a slightly broken object or damaged material from a second hand market place. I choose damaged objects because honeybees are meticulous beings, they continuously mend anything around them and they do pay attention to detail. To encourage the honeybees to communicate, I strategically add wax or honey, propolis or hand-made honeycomb patterns to the objects prior to placing them into their hives. At least I like to think my methods are strategic. The honeybees often think otherwise and respond to what is placed within their hive in ways that make my mind reel.”

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Amit Shimoni Reimagines World Leaders As Hipsters

Amit Shimoni Illustration

Amit Shimoni Illustration

Amit Shimoni Illustration

Amit Shimoni

If you’ve ever wondered what your favorite world leaders would look like as hipster, ponder no more. Illustrator Amit Shimoni reimagines presidents, prime ministers and radicals into modern day trendsetters in Hipstory. With an overall, uncanny resemblance to Mad Magazine’s Alfred E Neuman, Shimoni’s portraits of dignitaries such as John F. Kennedy, Margaret Thatcher, and Ghandi give new meaning to nose-rings and Ray Bans. His lighthearted link to the past, just another reminder of our voracious appetite for turning the old, cool again. Even in jest, his subject’s hairstyles remain constant. Who knew JFK’s windswept wave would be in style 50 years later, or that Ghandi’s baldness would be a current fashion statement for both male and female? A few inside jokes include Kennedy rockin’ a Marilyn tee and a tropical patterned baseball jacket on Nelson Mandela.

It’s lighthearted and fun to imagine these historical figures in youth of today clothing and accessories, but deeper meanings prevail. It’s no secret that fashion has the power of showing what side of the fence you’re on. A visual signifier that immediately lets the world know who you’re with. In Ghandi’s portrait, the passive resistance peacemaker is painted in Grateful Dead rainbow t-shirt. If he were alive today, he would most definitely be pro-vegan protesting police brutality. Margaret Thatcher, on the other hand, looking rebellious in riot grrrl gear, could be fronting a punk rock band singing political injustice. The only sour apple of the bunch is Honest Abe. Appearing uncomfortable and moody in rockabilly jacket and gold chain, his apparent awkwardness might mean this trend can only be recycled back so far. The portraits are available for sale on the artist’s site in various incarnations including prints, t-shirts, cell phone skins and more.  (via Fubiz)

Jen Mussari

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Jen Mussari is a Pennsylvania native fine artist, illustrator, typographer, and maker of DIY handmade art. She is now at MICA in Baltimore working on her BFA. Check out her new series of hand printed poster series called Very Important Posters, which are a combination of  hand-drawn typography and minimal illustration to communicate varied messages.  These messages range from critical to welcoming, comical to concerned.  You can collect all eight on her ETSY store!

Steve Jobs Cheese Head Supreme

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Chef Ken has taken Mac Fanboy-dom and food sculptural likenesses to a…ahem…cheesy new level. Savor the delights of Steve Jobs head on an appetizer platter, in a sizzling plate of “iPad Thai” or in a festive nacho concoction.  A big ghastly when his head melts all over the chips. I can’t really say much more.

Virginia Mori’s Dark, Surreal Illustrations Of Headless Women

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Italian illustrator Virginia Mori uses black ballpoint pen and pencil on paper to create strange, lady-centric compositions. The minimal drawings feature long-haired women in surreal situations. Heads are often seen severed or parts of the body are fused with furniture. Although they are weird, Mori’s work isn’t gruesome. Even when a umbrella handle is coming out of a character’s mouth, there’s no blood or guts. It’s simply a surreal scene.

Mori separates mind from body, in both literal and figurative ways. Heads are rolling, they exist on different levels, and are obstructed by hair. It represents the idea that we can “disconnect” our mental from our physical self, and that this separation can feel like two entities. But in Mori’s illustrations, what causes it? Mystics? Physical ailments? Lessons not learned? The sparse compositions allow for multiple interpretations.

Antonio Mora Transforms Human Portraits Into Mind-Bending Illusions

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Double exposure portraits by Spanish-based artist Antonio Mora (a.k.a. Mylovt) blend human and nature worlds into surreal hybrid artworks. Mora works with images he’d found browsing through online databases, magazines and blogs, and then fuses them together using skillful photo manipulation techniques. His seamless way of mixing various concepts together leaves the viewer with mind-tricking illusions.

“I want people to feel inspired when observing my artworks, and that is what I long for. I often look at images hundreds of times without finding anything, and then the spark just arrives. It’s a bit like fishing, a matter of patience and intuition.”

Mora describes his artworks as cocktails, mixtures of ordinary elements merged into forceful and expressive daydreams. According to the artist, his inspiration is provided by the limitless Internet itself and he feels as a medium between the two parallel worlds: real-life and the Web.

Antonio Mora originally graduated from graphic design. Right after his studies, he started a personal design studio which turned him into an art director for 15 years. Gradually, artist decided to concentrate on his art solely. Mora is one of the artists whose instant fame relies on social media: “Social networks, especially Pinterest, have been an important vehicle to spread by artworks”.

His mind-bending photo manipulations are very accessible to the public, as Mora offers anyone the chance to have their own portrait turned into an astounding work of art. (via Writeca)