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Jason Martin’s Sleek Hair

I love Jason Martin’s abstracted hair portraits. Ah, shiny, sleek, long hair, shines like an angel….

 

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Patty Carroll’s Ghostly Women Draped In Fabric

Patty Carroll - Photography

Patty Carroll - Photography

Patty Carroll - Photography

Patty Carroll - Photography

Patty Carroll photographs women who hide behind fabric. In her series, Anonymous Women: Draped, she features figures sitting and standing, all shrouded in luscious fabrics, rugs, and more. These women are invisible, meant to convey the idea that as we perfect the space of our home, it can fuse with our identity. Carroll’s choice in fabrics harkens another era, and look like they could be in the house of a grandparent. The Nuclear family of the 1950’s and 1960’s comes to mind in her work, when women’s roles were often domestically confined. Carroll writes about the series and the inspiration and implications behind it, stating:

I am addressing the double edge of domesticity; the home as a place of comfort, or conversely, a place where decoration camouflages one’s individuality to the point of claustrophobia. The draperies in these photographs act as both a visual cue as well as a literal interpretation of over-identification/obsession! While my direct sources for this series come from furnishing a home, as well as remembering the nuns in their habits while growing up, this series also references draped statues from the Renaissance, women wearing the burka, the Virgin Mary, ancient Greek and Roman dress, priests’ and judges’ robes, among others. I believe everyone has a hidden identity formed by personal traditions, memories, and ideas that are cloaked from the outer world. Cultivating these inner psychological, emotional and intellectual worlds is perhaps our greatest challenge as people, wherever we come from or wherever we live. (Via I need a guide)

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A Street Art Story

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Street artist Mobstr produced this piece, The Story.  Each painted-over line of the story allows the next to proceed.  Much of Mobstr’s street art works on assumption that his work will soon be painted over – it relies on its inevitable destruction.  Like his story states, his distinct approach to street art makes use this “strange harmony”.

A Sculpture That Breathes- John Grade’s Weather-Reactive ‘Capacitor’

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John Grade

John Grade sculpture

John Grade’s Capacitor is a site-specific installation which reacts to the climate of the site it inhabits. Located within the John Michael Kohler Arts Center in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, this enormous coil is roughly 40′ x 20′ x 20′ and slowly reacts to the changing wind directions and temperatures of the outside environment. Physically behaving according to statistics collected outside the institution, a mechanized controller within the installation powers the enormous coil’s shape. According to Grade, “the whole of the sculpture will appear to be very slowly breathing”. Capacitor also changes the brightness of the lights within the construct, giving an entire reaction to outside elements. (contemporist and artist’s site)

The Ancient Art Of Mandalas Revisited With A Pop Culture Twist

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Husband and wife visual artist team Hillerbrand+Magsamen crafted a series of twists on the traditional mandala. More commonly known through the Tibetan sand mandala, the original, ancient process consists of intricate patterns of sand that are later destroyed. Hillberbrand+Magsamen’s interpretation is similarly meticulous, but has a pop culture twist. Using things like books, Legos, shoes, sippy cups, things that are blue and others green, they arrange these objects in a circular, radiating formation. This light-hearted assemblage has a deeper meaning to the artists, who explain:

Loosely translated to mean “circle,” a mandala is far more than a simple shape. It represents wholeness, and can be seen as a model for the organizational structure of life itself–a cosmic diagram that reminds us of our relation to the infinite, the world that extends both beyond and within our bodies and minds. We have created mandala’s within our own home out of the stuff we have found lying around in our own creative exploration.

So often, we get caught up in the hustle and bustle of everyday life. The act of creating these works is a slow, meditative process. As these objects form a circle, there is consideration to not only placement, but the associations we have to them. It allows us to think about how the things we own are a reflection of who we are. (Via Faith is Torment)

Happy America Day!

We’re taking the day off from blogging today to celebrate a lil place on earth called America. Sure we have some problems and our government is far from perfect but after living around the world I can honestly say that I’m proud to be part of our great nation. Having the freedom to say and do whatever we want is priceless so let us all take this day and appreciate our our home and make a commitment to make it even better. We’ll be hitting up the beach and eating way too much food (like any patriot) all day long but we’ll be back tomorrow with loads of posts and other goodies to keep you inspired and entertained!

 

 

Liz Craft @ Patrick Painter

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"Candy Colored Clown (Lemon Eye Zig Zag Teeth)"

I never was too good at crafts. The little “easy loom” knit-a-kitten sets always came out looking surprisingly like Liz Craft’s sculpture, above…a mess of plaster-cast, jumbo yarn, pea-pod plastic dishes forming some sort of  goofy-grin. Or at least, I wished they came out like her work. In her recent fifth solo exhibition, “Death of a Clown” that just finished up at Patrick Painter, Liz Craft examines, in part, the culture of Regretsy…(Etsy + Regret). Macrame-mishaps and craft-catastrophes are elevated to objects d’art. At once humorous and fresh, Craft’s odd string-beards, tears, and thrift store nick-nacks don’t disappoint.

Nicholas Di Genova’s Preemptive Evolution

 

Nicholas Di Genova has developed a unique practice that is as firmly rooted in the utterly fantastical as it is in the deeply scientific. His depictions of hybrid creatures examine wildlife illustration through a Sci-fi lens. Di Genova’s highly detailed, and often encyclopaedic investigations of the natural world, yield monstrosities that are the most unlikely of amalgamations – these can be, for instance, a fusion of cat, goat and snake with cormorant, or tortoise merging into carnivorous plant and even a toad with eight, tentacle-like tongues. His depictions are obviously imagined; but Di Genova’s illustrative precision, makes these Audubon caricatures almost plausible.

His materials are simple; he looks to the conventions of analogue animation, which employs gouache paint on Mylar, or the very basic approach of ink on paper. But Di Genova pushes line-work and a compact colour palette to the extreme; his seamless and fluid application of medium is in the service of an unparalleled intricacy of image. From the tiniest black and white elements (which can be a mere couple of centimetres square) to the robust and colourful, full-sized works, Di Genova’s articulation of shape and texture is nothing short of masterful. See Nicholas’ work at Galerie Dukan Hourdequin in Paris from November 11th-December 3rd 2011.