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Dylan Shields Reinvents Classical Sculpture Out Of Cardboard

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Dylan Shields, an artist based in London, creates sculptures that investigate the relationship between classical sculpture and contemporary materials.

The sculptures further explore and build upon the existent relationship between canonical works of art (in this case and its contexts within modern society by creating them out of cardboard, a relatively new (ish) material in the realm of art-making. He uses re-cycled cardboard and parcel tape to produce work that is at both familiar yet fresh by its original use of form and perspective.

“It has been a process of trial and error to perfect my style. One of the challenges of working with cardboard is the limitation of its flexibility. Also, sourcing the right colors has been difficult as I don’t paint the sculptures, so the colors have to come from the cardboard.”

(via ARTNAU and Junk Culture)

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Eloy Morales’ Masked Self Portraits Are Actually Hyper Realistic Paintings

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It is almost difficult to believe that these self-portraits by Spanish Eloy Morales are oil paintings.  His oil painting are generally executed on large panels such as the one above.  Morales carefully blends colors and layers to flawlessly recreate his portraits.  He nearly seems to consider each painting a separate test of his abilities.  Morales is known to write notes prior to a painting of goals to meet that he felt weren’t met on a previous work.  However, there is more to his work then a simple recreation of a photorgaph.  Morales explains in Poets and Artists Magazine:

“I am interested in working on reality through the use of pictorial codes, previously understanding that it is a false relation and I always keep in mind that painting is an independent expression. Finding a meeting point that truly represents my vision keeps me going on painting.” [via ignant]

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Lady Lamb The Beekeeper’s Debut Studio Album, Ripley Pine

Lady Lamb The Beekeeper performing at the Bootleg Bar in Los Angeles, June 15, 2013.

Lady Lamb The Beekeeper aka Aly Spaltro recently released her debut studio album, Ripley Pine on Ba Da Bing Records. I was able to catch her solo performance the other night at the Bootleg Bar in Los Angeles and was blown away by her songs and incredible voice. At only 23, she has the stage presence of a seasoned pro starting her set singing acapella with an un-released song called, “Up in the Rafters”. Other stand out songs from the set included, “Between Two Trees” from her digital album, Mammoth Swoon, as well as the fantastic, “Aubergine” and “The Nothing Part II” from her new record. “I refuse to come back out here without a band” said Aly before performing her final song, “Crane Your Neck”.

Lady Lamb is currently on a co-headlining tour with Torres and will soon be supporting Thao & The Get Down Stay Down through August. You can check her out this coming Sunday, June 23rd at the Hi-Dive in Denver as well as in Chicago at the Empty Bottle on June 27th. You can listen to her many digital albums here as well as purchase her new record here. Check out her new video for, “The Nothing Part II, and be sure to keep an eye on this talented young singer/songwriter.

 

 

 

Jarritos Flavor City Winners!

Paul Naveda

Paul Naveda, 1st Place

Beautiful/Decay was recently asked to judge the Jarritos Flavor City art & design competition. Contestants were asked to creatively interpret the slogan “DRINK OUT LOUD,” and the winners are in! #1 was artist Paul Naveda, above. Check out the rest of the winners after the jump!

Mike Stefanini

Classic typography with a twist, slick illustrations, and just the right amount of humor go into all the works in the portfolio of Parisian designer and illustrator Mike Stefanini A.K.A Atomike Studio.

Animated Gifs Illustrate Traditional Japanese Woodblock Prints With Humour And Fantasy

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Segawa 37 pays tribute to Japanese art by creating Gifs from the original work of traditional Japanese woodblock prints, “pictures of the floating world’. Most of the time, he only animates a few parts, adding a realistic and modern add-on to the art piece. In other images, he blends in futuristic elements, denaturalizing the first intention of the historical painting. Originally, Japanese woodblock paintings, also called Ukiyo-e, were depictions of everyday scenes in Japan. Affordable, they represented the possibility for the mass to access art. Segawa 37 gives a new life to these prints by altering their core. From hyper realistic to surreal, the artist offers to the modern world a new way of looking at a classic form of art. 

The most emblematic representation of Japan, a contemplation of movements; calm and serene, but always intense remains within those wooden prints. The artist’s reinterpretation of Katsushika Hokusai’s images is disturbing the stillness and tranquility of the scenes.
The Shinkansen, a Japanese high-speed train is passing by travelers resting at a station, a person is driving a segway in the middle of a road field, a couple of people, watching mount Fuji are also seeing a extraterrestrial flying saucers passing by. What is meant to be admired in almost a meditative state is now entertaining.

Discover Segawa 37’ series of Gifs on the GifMagazine award page sponsored by Adobe. (via Spoon&Tamago)

Adam Miller’s Contemporary Mythological Paintings

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With his paintings, Adam Miller recontextualizes baroque and Hellenistic style elements by placing them within a modern futuristic landscape. Miller implements mythological, ecological, and humanistic themes in order to address ideas of technology and progress and “the struggle to find meaning in a world poised between expansion and decay.” His dreamy and angelic compositions reflect contemporary concerns with a classic and realist style. Imagery that might at first appear dated and inaccessible becomes relatable and modern upon closer inspection.