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Maurice Mikkers’ Stunning Photographs Of Tears Reveal Their Crystalized Magnificence

tears4 tears3 tears2 tears1

Dutch photographer Maurice Mikkers’ latest project “Imaginarium of Tears” shows that tears, much like snowflakes are all different. His series explores the magnificence of tears on both an aesthetic and molecular level. By placing tears under a microscope, he provides us with a close examination of crystallized tears in such a way that allows you to observe the different sections and patterns present within each tear. Mikkers’ series is based in his interest in tears from a scientific perspective and the way they are each composed of different elements and each have their own chemical structure.

His fascination for the individuality of tears I all the more interesting given the way in which he has chosen the tears to use for his project. Mikkers selected a group of his friends and asked them “what they would like to cry from”. He then gave them a selection of tear inducing activities such as cutting onions, looking into a fan, or eating hot peppers. He says he was highly interested in examining the ways in which each individual tear looks different when examined closely.

The process itself includes capturing the tears with a micropipette, placing them on a microscopic slide, and then letting them settle. The result of his project is a series of tears that are so meticulously different in all their details and, on a larger scale, a merging of science and art.

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Brandi Strickland’s Inner Space Collages

Brandi Strickland - Mixed Media

 

Brandi Strickland - Mixed Media

Brandi Strickland - Mixed Media

Brandi Strickland’s collages are a mixture of photographs, painting, and drawing. Exploring different themes, Strickland fills her compositions with people and textures, utilizing a lot of old, faded papers, and National Geographic-like magazines. Inner Space is a series about the galaxy and our world, examining topics such as overcrowding, our relationship to our planet, and our perception of space.

Strickland combines a dizzying amount of black and gray tones, playing with scale of stars and fractured light. Each work in Inner Space seems to illustrate a different aspect of space. In one work, The Duat, (directly above) the artist has included pair of eyes, signifying fear of intergalactic exploration. In that same piece, Strickland has a woman diving, as if you say we should embrace these fears.

The piece titled Inner Space (below) focuses more specifically on Earth. It is a visual magpie; Strickland has collected shiny, colorful, manmade, and natural imagery to represent a world that’s focused less on the great unknown and more about ourselves. The sphere takes up most of the composition, too – it’s just all about Earth. Amulet (also below) has the same thematic considerations that Inner Space does, but it recognizes that we are just a very small but valuable part to the greater universe. Scale-wise, the Earth that was so large in Inner Space is significantly smaller by comparison. An amulet’s most important characteristic is its alleged power to protect from evil, so the title suggests that we are either in need of one or we are one.

Strickland describes her work, stating, “For me, collage begins with collecting, saving, acquiring, searching; then, as if they were memories, I meticulously sort, separate and organize them into something new, something that is both happily accidental and tediously arranged.” The series demonstrates a meditation on this theme, and I’d be curious to know what conclusions she drew.

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Megan Bogonovich’s Ceramic Sculptures Of Oversized Coral Reefs Are Detailed Fairytales

 ceramic coral reef  ceramic coral reef Megan Bogonovich - ceramic Megan Bogonovich - ceramic

In New Hampshire-based artist Megan Bogonovich’s magical ceramic sculptures, well-dressed women and men peek into gigantic anemones and castle-like coral reefs, plunging headfirst inside like Alice in Wonderland. Looking at the sculptures is similar to reading an enchanting fairytale, with each ornate detail given the attention and intricacy usually afforded to the illustrations in a children’s storybook. Bogonovich’s eye for detail is perhaps most evident in the underwater creatures poised to swallow their small-scale human counterparts. Made colossal in comparison, they foster the sense of wonder and impending adventure that Bogonovich is so adept at creating for each of her sculptures. There’s no end to the number of details one can glean looking at just one of Bogonovich’s sculptures, from the little girl peering into the rose-like openings in a slab of coral to the woman on the cusp of falling headlong into a multicolored anemone that, with its open valves, strongly resembles a human heart. Bogonovich’s sculptures are painted in vivid pastel colors of yellows, pinks, and greens, which lends them an even stronger storybook aesthetic. This serves them well in conjuring up all of the magical scenarios to follow the spellbinding scenes her sculptures capture. (via Hi Fructose)

A World of Soft Fantasy in Damien Kamholtz’s Paintings

 

Australian artist Damien Kamholtz recently opened Boats Like Feathers, an exhibition of new works at Art House Gallery in Melbourne. From the gallery’s website:

Boats Like Feathers brings together the child and adult in a soft and vibrant world of narrative and metaphor evoked through Damien Kamholtz’s deeply layered and nostalgic work, rich with a story unique to each viewer if they are willing to take part in the journey.

More images after from the show after the jump, and you can check out a video of the artist in the studio here.

George Boorujy’s Hyper-Realistic Paintings Confront The Viewer With Intense Animal Gazes

George Boorujy - Ink on Paper George Boorujy - Ink on Paper George Boorujy - Ink on Paper George Boorujy - Ink on Paper

George Boorujy is a New York-based artist who paints large-scale animal portraits with ink. His subjects are non-human inhabitants of North America, such as bluebirds, lynxes, vultures, and black bears. Each species is incredibly researched, and it shows; after visiting zoos and studying photographs, Boorujy recreates the animals with painstaking detail. Every feather and tuft of fur is accounted for, creating a palpable and almost hyper-realistic sense of texture and animation. Set against a white backdrop, the viewer gets the rare opportunity to study the animals and appreciate their distinctiveness and beauty.

There is no denying that Boorujy’s subjects have a way of demanding our attention; their silent, steady gazes drill into the soul, in a deeply personal encounter. When our eyes meet, the boundaries between “humans” and “animals” fall away into a greater awareness of cross-species consciousness. The following quoted statement from Colossal reveals the emotional and philosophical intent of Boorujy’s works:

“Boorujy challenges the viewer to confront both the animal and their preconceived notions about it. Through their gaze an interaction evolves with the wild that otherwise would have to be sought out or birthed from happenstance. However fleeting our exchanges with the wild are, an impression of their presence marks our memories. There is something mystical at play; a silent exchange that either moves us towards awareness or heightens our fear of the unknown.” (Source)

More of Boorujy’s works can be viewed on his website. (Via Hi-Fructose)

Photographs Of Super Heroes As Saints

Antonio Strafella digital art3

SPIRITUAL HERO

SPIRITUAL HERO

Perhaps the digital artwork of Antonio Strafella isn’t so profane as it may at first seem.  His series Spiritual Hero at once compares and juxtaposes saints and superheroes, the holy and the vulgar.  Comic books are often thought of as the exclusive domain of young people, rarely taken serious.  However, in a strange way the superheroes don’t seem exceptionally out of place in Strafella’s work.  Indeed, many of the grand story lines of the characters featured by Strafella have clear Biblical references.  He goes on to say:

“These icons have various aspects in common: saints do miracles and superheroes have superpowers, both are venerated, opening the conflict between faith and zealotry.”

Ghostly, Warped Prints and Drawings from Joseph Parra

 

Joseph Parra, who received his BFA in Painting this year from MICA, has started his career with a running start. Back in 2008, he worked with famed architect  Richard Gehry as part of HBO’s Masterclass,  and last year he completed a solo show at Galerie M in Milwaukee, WI. He distorts portraits of absentminded subjects with unorthodox techniques, employing sand paper and collage. Parra’s charcoal drawings, also figurative in nature, are equally of note. His drawings (like his prints) are ghostly. His figures are presented with little distraction, no context or background. This demonstrates a confidence in his image making. He’s showing us exactly what he wants us to see.