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Michael Zimmerer’s Disappearing Horizon

Photographer Michael Zimmerer‘s series White Horizon captures a Midwest white-out.  Zimmerer’s stark images capture a landscape shortly after a snow storm in which the horizon seems to disappear.  Even the sun is lost in the sky.  The expansive fields of white are interrupted by the dark shapes of buffalo, river, rock, or trees.  A nearly abstract quality is lent to the photographs more often seen on the canvas.  However, the subject matter – the untouched snow, clear rivers, wild animals – also seems to emphasize the absence of the human hand and its loneliness.

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Aftershock L.A.

AFTERSHOCK_LA

Elemental and Royal/T are hosting a benefit art auction for Build Change, a non-profit organization that helps build earthquake resistant homes. The night will feature 92 artists and over 100 works of art, as well as live music and free food. For more info on the show and the artists involved, please visit www.aftershockla.com. See some of my favorite images by artists in the show after the jump.

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Cubist Inspired Street Art

Ruben Sanchez street art7 Ruben Sanchez street art6

Ruben Sanchez street art5

Spain based street artist Ruben Sanchez has a peculiar artistic style.  His work can be found internationally (his latest, the top photograph, created in Dubai).  However, his home of Spain can be found in his artwork anywhere its painted.  Influences such as Picasso’s Cubism or Miro’s Surrealism are clear in his spray painted mural.  He goes on to say of the influences that can be found in his work:

“If you dissect any of my artworks in an operating room you will find graphic design, tribal art, graffiti, cubism, skateboard culture, 90’s and 80’s music, flamenco, social situations and a kaleidoscope among others.”

Pierre Schmidt’s Melting Faces Show Us The Terrifying Beauty Of The Subconscious Mind

Pierre Schmidt - Illustration, Collage, Photo-ManipulationPierre Schmidt - Illustration, Collage, Photo-ManipulationPierre Schmidt - Illustration, Collage, Photo-Manipulation

Artist Pierre Schmidt constructs surreal worlds filled with the inner horrors of the subconscious, both terrifying and beautiful. Using photo-manipulation, illustration, and collage, he combines both traditional and digital methods to create scenes of people with faces dripping right off their skulls. Many of his disturbing, melting face runs down the composition, only to reveal sudden bouquets of flowers. Using vintage photographs, he collages imagery of 1950’s housewife types lounging about, only to be caught up in a peculiar and fantastic scene. Schmidt’s work is highly psychological, as many of his pieces have titles based on the theories and writings of philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. His flowing faces crack open the hidden psyche, pouring out its contents for us to examine. The face being a vessel of identity, Schmidt strips his characters of this so that we may look inwards into our own mind.

The Berlin based artist offers us a glimpse into a strange world of bizarre happenings, filled with faceless ladies, lush flora, and silhouettes that contain galaxies. Schmidt’s work is full of emotion and internal awareness, leaving us to sort out his stunning and complicated mash of imagery. We are left to decipher his sliced open heads, melting eyes, and rainbows oozing from faces. Like stream of consciousness, Schmidt melds together his illustrations with a unifying flow, effortlessly forming captivating and magnetic work. (via Hi-Fructose)

Chet Phillips

Phineas H. Flabbergast

Phineas H. Flabbergast

Created using the digital software program Painter, artist Chet Phillips of Chetart creates the most whimsical human – animal connections. Poodles as wrestlers? Monkeys smoking pipes? Make sure you check out the titles of all his pieces, they are as silly as the images. The one above is entitled Phineas H. Flabbergast.

Photographs of Miniature Plastic People Interacting with the Nude Figure

 

Maybe a little exploitative but well done nevertheless, these shots from photographer Allan Teger are done in single exposures. Natural, bodily curves take the place of hilly landscapes as miniature  “people” go about their business perfectly naturally. A nice way to celebrate the human form through re-contextualization, or just pretty shots of naked people- what do you think? Whenever I see these little plastic guys being used in such a way, I always think of Slinkachu’s “Little People Project”. I guess this is a common thing now. But Teger’s been doing it for a while. (via)

Kristine Moran

Kristine Moran’s abstract clouds of color and juicy brushstrokes float through spaces like paint ghosts looking to get in touch with the living world.

Richard Galpin

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British artist Richard Galpin has developed a very specific method which he uses to create all of his work, going all the way back to 2001. He shoots photographs in cities and then takes a scalpel to them, stripping away pieces of the image until a new kind of image of urban space – a very futuristic urban space – emerges. So while he is imagining the future, we can still see the vestiges of the past.