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Dana Oldfather


Dana Oldfather is an artist that currently works in Cleveland, Ohio. Her abstract paintings have this beautifully organic nature that it almost feels as if she painted from a bio-lab sample of a plant. Composed of oddly shapes, splashes and blobs of paint, her color scheme is very earthly and neutral and this helps set the tone in the painting.

She states about her work, “Each work is an attempt to elegantly express the embodiment of paradox; a physical manifestation of conflicting desires communicated in an abstract arrangement of forms.” She will be showing her work at William Rupnik Gallery in Cleveland, April 23 – May 9, titled We Are Mountains.

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Tetsuya Ishida


Like clues in a crime scene, Tetsuya Ishida’s paintings use a million tiny details to tell their story. The note on the table, the eerie playtime carnage–Ishida’s work often speaks of the uncertain union between Man and Machine. But I think the most unsettling thing about his paintings is that the human figures’ reactions range only from complacency to mild concern, as if I re-enacted deadly car accidents with my toys on a daily basis. In a tragic act of irony, Ishida himself was hit and killed by a train in 2005.

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The Unaltered Photography of Matt Perrin

Matt Perrin believes in the magic of classic photography.  Perrin decidedly does not use Photoshop or manipulate his photographs once the shutter clicks.  Rather, he fully utilizes the simple features of his camera and experimental lighting to create his dreamy images.  His photographs glow like cosmic abstractions.  Perrin is intentionally ambiguous as to the exact nature of his subject matter.  Rather, he encourages a more open reading similar to abstract painting.  He says of his process:

” Any object seen, in any photograph, was physically in front of the lens when the shutter opened and closed. It’s the twists and turns that have occurred between those points that have brought you here today.”

Johan Creten’s Abstract Ceramic Sculptures Covered With Vulvas Tackle The Ambiguity Of Sexuality

Johan Creten - Sculpture 9 Johan Creten - Sculpture 8

Johan Creten speaks his own language. He creates organic creatures by casting a rare medium used in the art world: clay. It has been considered too primitive, associated with craft rather than sculpture for a long time. Johan Creten imposed his vision and art and is now established in the most prestigious residencies : Sevres and Medici. (an art residency is a place where an artist is invited to work with the best artisans and manufacturers in order to create master pieces. A residency can catapult an unknown artist to fame and success overnight).

The artist was born in Belgium and is now traveling throughout the world. He calls himself an observer of the world. His mission is to translate the social tensions and injustices into beautiful abstract ceramic sculptures. While other artists would rather think about a project and have it conceived by a third party, he is choosing to dig his hands into the clay which he calls “mother earth”.

His signature are large scaled bodies covered with glazed vulvas with which he approaches themes like the ambiguity of sexuality, solitude as a threat and the injustice of social status. Ceramic was never a form of art before Johan Creten. The fact that he was able to live with the harshness of his peers ignoring his work as art is a resistantce which makes him proud. He uses this relationship to balance his art. His pieces reflect our roots in today’s world but they are facing the future.

A must see: Johan Creten solo exhibition at Gallery Perrotin in New York City this coming September 2015

SITU wraps up Atticus Site!

SomethingIntheUniverse_AtticusBeautiful/Decay’s sister company, Something in The Universe, recently wrapped up re-vamping Los Angeles music-infuenced brand Atticus Clothing’s web site! SITU “riffed” off their loose, energetic rock-music vibe throughout the site, from page layout to fonts. Check it out!

Book Review: The Time After



We recently received Doug Fogelson’s book “The Time After” in the mail today. One of the catch phrases on the press release is: “Temporal speculation for the post climate change era.” Heavy! Although it’s not as apocalyptic as the Popul Vuh’s 2012 world-termination prognosis, and not as, ahem, temporally speculative (in my opinion) to warrant vast assumptions about the post climate change era, there are some prismatic, multi-exposed layered photographs that time-lapsed-surfaced-ly explore the age old question of nature, man, and their relation to time. Shots of clouds and forests lay side by side by sprawling city streets. It’s certainly an interesting attempt to turn such a tired trope of amateur photography (the double-expose) into the basis for a complicated conceptual framework, though how many “heady” points on the nature of humanity the book makes, I’m not so sure.  Regardless, the book features stunning and creative print lay out and design by Tim Hartford. 


Yuri Suzuki’s Phonograph Globes, Flame Organs, Theremin Radios

 Yuri Suzuki is an English artist/designer/inventor who has been making some really remarkable objects. They’re not really “art” in a traditional sense, but they’re not products or inventions that would ever be used by The People, nor are they simple design ideas. What they are, is amazing–phonograph globes, flame organs, theremin radios. Yuri is also a big supporter of the DIY community, so if you’re wondering how to make any of his objects, he has instructions for most of them on his website. Suzuki’s is a very special brain. Check out videos of his objects in action after the jump! ( via )

Gordon Magnin


Gordon Magnin, an artist currently residing in Los Angeles, California,  works with found images to turn high fashion magazine layouts into bizarre portraits. I  like the way he cuts up the found images and pieces them back together to create something completely new, each having their own personality.