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Yuri Suzuki’s Tiny Robot Orchestra Turns Drawings Into Music

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For Japanese designer Yuri Suzuki, dyslexia prevented him reading music in the traditional sense. But that didn’t stop him playing it. Instead, he adopted a playful approach and created an installation that invites viewers to produce their own music using color markers. Visitors draw along the curvy lines on the floor, and then the robots translate their marks into one-of-a-kind sound pieces.

The robots are called Color Chasers, and they associate each color that they find on their path with a sound. This small, unique orchestra features five different machines that each have their own sound and shape. The Basscar has a Dubstep-like sound, the Glitchcar reproduces computer-like sounds, and the Melodycar, Arpeggiocar, and the Drumcar to add rhythm.

This imaginative work was recently selected by the New York MoMA for their collection. (Via Spoon and Tamago)

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Miami Project 2013 Highlights

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Kate Clark’s half-human, half-animal sculpture

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Vanessa German’s Doll sculptures

Miami Project, one of the biggest fairs in the Wynwood district this year, celebrates some of the most sought after artists this year. Most importantly though, as Jillian Steinhauer brings to light in her article ‘The Women of Miami Project’, most of the impressive works here were created by women. Consequently,  most of my favorite works in this fair were created by women too!

Here are some of the highlights at the Miami Project art fair:

Brooklyn based artist Kate Clark creates sculptures that are a lifelike fusion of a human and an animal. The surreal object, almost human-sized, investigates which characteristics separate us within the animal kingdom, and more importantly, which ones unite us.

The unexpectedness of the human face on these animals also evokes curiosity. They are obviously reconstructed yet they are not monstrous, they are approachable, natural, calm, innocent, dignified. The facial features are believable and the skin, which is the animal’s skin, has been shaved to reveal porous and oily features that we recognize as our own. The viewer has an intimate relationship with the face and then identifies with the animal, acknowledging the animalistic inheritance within the human condition.

Vanessa German, a multidisciplinary artist [sculptor, photographer, painter, actress, poet] and advocate for the black female experience,  creates these female figures that are made out of plaster, wood, glue, tar and found objects: hair, shells, old jewelry. They each represent aspects of female experience, power, and her cultural heritage.

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Carlos Cruz Diez’ Ultra-Colorful Light Installations

 

Carlos Cruz Diez‘ choice medium in his installation Chromosaturation is simply color.  While we’re accustomed to seeing many different colors constantly and simultaneously, Diez uses only three colors presented one at a time as a departure point: red, green, and blue.  Diez saturates a room with one of these single primary colors of light.  The color floods from room to room, interacting with other colors, creating entirely new hues.  The light immerses the gallery space so thoroughly that the color almost takes on a physical aspect.  In his statement, Diez says:

“The Chromosaturation can act as a trigger, activating in the viewer the notion of color as a material or physical situation, going into space without the aid of any form or even without any support, regardless of cultural beliefs.”

Liza Corbett

Illustrator Liza Corbett lives and works in New York, previously having studied at Syracuse University and the Studio Arts Center International in Florence, Italy. Her dark fantasies and fairy tales populated by angular ladies, weed-people, and animal bones have appeared in exhibitions both here and abroad, as well as on the pages of Atlantic Monthly, Bitch Magazine, and – best of all, amirite? – now Beautiful/Decay. Check out her creations after the jump. Oh, and maybe try to find all the severed limbs. It’s like a Where’s Waldo of scissor-cut hands, really.

Serrah Russell’s Muted Body As Landscape Photographs

Serrah Russell lives and works in Seattle, WA. Using instant film her work often presents the body as an ominous muted landscape. Her close-up snap shots take on the form of hazy abstractions. Her work has been described as a way to “illuminate the permanent effect that actions trace upon their environment. Her works are a tangible remnant of an abstracted and often autobiographical narrative of immutable occurrences that move forward in a flux of nature, culture and time.”

Jorge Rodríguez-Gerada’s Charcoal Street Art Portraits

In 2002 Jorge Rodríguez-Gerada moved to Barcelona where he began his ‘Identity Series’. Gerada was drawn to the beauty of old surfaces and wanted to blend photo realistic images of anonymous locals to question the controls imposed in public space, and the use and abuse of iconic faces to sell us products and ideas. He decided to apply the same approaches used by advertising, such as strategic positioning and size, but with the intention of creating a poetic counter commentary that fades away with beauty. The Identity Series is about initiating a dialogue with a local community through art. These portraits transformed local, anonymous residents into social icons, giving relevance to an individual’s contribution to the community and touching upon the legacy that each life has to offer.

Gerada chose charcoal for its transparency and ephemeral quality. He involves the visual narrative of the textured wall instead of covering it. These time-based portraits gradually deteriorate. They become a metaphor of the fading of life, of fame and of the things we first thought were so important. The creation of the “Identity Series” is also an act that is environmentally sound and at the mercy of the natural world. The pieces fade away like the warmth after an embrace. The photo realistic drawing is only an aspect of the piece. The importance of the piece is the whole process of creation, destruction and memory. Watch a video of Gerada in action after the jump.

Doug McAbee’s Fun Time Structures

Doug McAbee’s sculptures look like something Alexander Calder would make if he had a better sense of humor.

Katsuyo Aoki’s Stunningly Intricate Porcelain Skulls

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Katsuyo Aoki creates stunningly intricate porcelain skulls. Her work is almost like a three-dimensional expansion on the tradition of calavera, decorated skulls made of sugar or clay to commemorate the Day of the Dead. She touches on this in her explanation of work, commenting that elevating the skull, which could be considered macabre, can make the viewer feel, “tranquility and awe that can almost be described as religious, as well as an image as an object of worship.”

The patterns on her skulls range from elegant swirls to jagged spikes that look like prehistoric teeth. Others unfurl like deep sea creatures from another plane of existence, stretching their frills out like anemones from beyond. The name of the exhibit, “Predictive Dreams,” further emphasizes the mystical qualities of the artwork, recalling a time when prophets and seers would study bones and entrails to gaze into the future.

Aoki says of the work:

“The decorative styles and forms I allude to and incorporate in my works each contain a story based on historical backgrounds and ideas, myths, and allegories. Their existence in the present age makes us feel many things; adoration, some sort of romantic emotions, a sense of unfruitfulness and languor from their excessiveness and vulgarity.”

(via Deadman’s Reach)