Get Social:

Big name + plinth = works of art?

 

 

Wolfgang Tillman's plinth

Wolfgang Tillmans' plinth

 

Graphic designer Peter Saville has designed a white cardboard, flatpack plinth, for sale in a limited edition of 200, the idea being that in today’s age of ‘culture for the masses’ we’re all entitled to choose what merits artistic status.

 

The exhibition showcases the plinths with ‘work’ by a selection of Saville’s peers and friends including Hans Ulrich Obrist, Thomas Demand, Gavin Turk and Jarvis Cocker, each allowed to place whatever they wish on their plinth. The results vary from the sublime (Douglas Gordon’s pile of ash atop a charred plinth) to the inflated (Cerith Wyn Evans’ helium balloon).

 

 

Advertise here !!!

The Incredible Decaying Remains Of The Soviet Space Shuttle Program

Ralph Mirebs - photography Ralph Mirebs - photography Ralph Mirebs - photography Ralph Mirebs - photography

A most fascinating thing has been found in Kazakhstan, Russia, by urban explorer Ralph Mirebs: the decaying shell of a space shuttle. The long-abandoned air craft was a part of a project called the Buran program. Launched in 1974 as part of the on-going international space race, this pet project of the Soviet Union was one of the largest and most expensive space exploration programs.

‘Buran’ is Russian for ‘snowstorm’ or ‘blizzard’ and a few prototypes of the shuttle were built (from plans stolen from NASA), but only one actually flew. Tens of millions of dollars were invested in this particular program, so it is such a shame to find the shuttle in such a demolished and forgotten state. Mirebs discovered this particular air craft in an old hangar that is still used by Russia today. It is located on a site called the Baikonur Cosmodrome, and is a launch pad for shuttles to reach the International Space Station.

This hangar is gigantic – at 433 feet long and 203 feet high, it has massive sliding doors on either end to let the shuttles out. Containing heavy duty cranes that can lift up to 400 tons, the building in itself is an incredible sight. Full of peeling paint, rusting beams and steel that can withstand shock waves from an explosion, the hangar is a piece of architecture that should be preserved.

Hopefully along with the publication of Mirebs’ photographs of this incredible discovery, someone will realize these historical artifacts need to be restored or at least protected from further decay and damage. Be sure to check out the amazing footage of the one and only shuttle launch in 1988 after the jump. (Via Bored Panda)

Advertise here !!!

Erased Lynchings

649_12297252891Ken Gonzales-Day creates a series of photographs in which the ropes and lynched victim have been removed from the scene.

Douglas White Creates An Abstract Elephant Skin Tent, Giving A Second Life To Abandoned Bodies

Douglas White - Installations 1Douglas White - Installations 4Douglas White - Installations 3

A tent made out of elephant skin as a large scale art installation. This does sounds like a shocking and provocative piece. Douglas White rips off our hearts and makes us angry before we even realize that he brilliantly fooled us. We are actually looking at an interpretation of what he encountered himself: an elephant’s deflated skin, draped and folded next to its bones like a collapsed tent. “Here was a body become landscape, a body both present and absent in which the distinction between the inner and outer had evaporated in the heat and decay. It was a body you could walk through…” said the artist. “Of all those objects that I ever encountered, this is the one I wanted most to possess…” Douglas White creates shapes, in between figuration and abstraction. Through his sculptures he is looking to get us sensitive on current problems like the environment, mass consumption and industrial products waste.

Ten years after his trip to East Africa and after numerous attempts in his London studio, the artist discovered a new way to work with clay. He conceived a thick and cracked texture close to a pachyderm’s skin. From there he developed a work of art around wood and clay. The result is bluffing: over 2500 lbs of wet clay suspended by a strange system of ropes, pulleys and wooden poles. By collecting thrown away or lost objects, Douglas White prefers to work with used materials to create spectacular and strange sculptures. Carbonized tires, containers, decomposed trees on a metal structure; through his art, Douglas White gives a second life to these abandoned materials.

If we makes analogies and dig into our primal instinct we can clearly see the reference to the structure of a circus big top. And if we dive even more deeper we can allow ourselves to link the song from Disney’s Dumbo soundtrack, “Song of the Roustabouts” to the name of the piece and we would be right to do so.

Gina Osterloh

13_dotsfrontmisfire

In “Shooting Blanks,” Gina Osterloh combines installation and preforming arts featuring herself on a paper stage. Her latest works, including “The Rash Room,” “The Cut Room,” and “The Turquoise Room,” are staged for the camera with Osterloh as the main subject enclosed in rooms of brightly colored bond paper. However, the candy colored walls frame a darker matter; Osterloh obscures her face behind her hair and often covers her entire body in paper strips, toying with the notion of identity crisis. In each installation, she slowly removes herself from the room, and is gradually eaten by the empty space, leaving behind a vacancy that echos that emptiness, or “blankness.”

Paul Loubet

Paul Loubet’s illustrations remind me of brightly colored Pinatas full of small treats, fun, mouth watering surprises. The above illustration is my favorite out of the bunch. Would make a nice addition to my collection of artist postcards and prints.

Malin Gabriella Nordin’s Slight Structures

Malin Gabriella Nordin lives and works in Bergen, Norway. She creates subtle compositions in multiple media with a focus on modest shapes. Natural and manmade textures are sourced and assembled to compose elegant collages. These collages then inform her sculptures that are as meek as they are monumental. 

Heikki Leis’ Beautifully Decayed Photographs

It should come as no surprise that we love a bit of decay in anything beautiful and Heikki Leis’ gorgeously lit  series Afterlife is the perfect marriage of the two. His photos of rotting food and  macro zooms of mold and decay have enough beauty and decay for the most diehard Cult Of Decay member.  Long live Beautiful Decay!

 

Ps. thanks to Christopher at Colossal for the link!)