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Greg Ferris-Trippy Collage

greg ferris collage

Not much info on the website of Sarasota, FL based artist Greg Ferris but there sure is some fantastic collage work.

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Iconograph Magazine Issue II

Iconograph Magazine has just released its stunning second issue in an edition of 750. The magazine is curated and published by Justin Blyth, with contributing editors Hassan Rahim, Justin Van Hoy & Andrew Pogany. Justin, who runs the expertly curated massive found image blog Them Thangs has produced an amazing encapsulation of contemporary dark esoteric imagery and writings. “Iconograph #2 is the second print offering in an ongoing series that gathers an eccentric collection of visual media and literature exploring the contemporary use of Ritualistic Iconography—the systems of symbols, mythic representations, and religious imagery from which we seek meaning. Iconograph #2 is an 80-page curated document, offset printed on an 8-color Heidelberg press in Belgium, in an edition of 750. It is privately funded and contains no advertising, promotion, album reviews, or horoscopes.” You can pick up a copy here.

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Korehiko Hino’s Buggin Out

Korehiko Hino’s paintings and drawings of bug-eyed  figures remind me sci-fi movies where aliens come down and put humans under a trance right before they probe them.  They are frozen in time, with no clues of whether they are about to die or if they are in an eternal state of euphoria.

Ye Chang’s Metamorphic Installation Of 10,000 Petri Dishes





Chinese architect Ye Chang‘s Kong Shanshui/Empty Shanshui is a naturally transforming installation consisting of over 10,000 petri dishes. Part of the “Pavilion of China – Architecture China 2013” exhibition, which recently opened at the Palacio Quintanar in the Segovia, Spain, the piece has a unique, changing quality. The base of the installation consists of layers of white stones which fill the ancient palace’s courtyard, echoing peaceful, meditative gardens. On top of the stones are piles or gatherings of petri dishes, some ten thousand in total, stacked in various forms, resembling miniature hills, mountains and rock formations.

According to Sue Wang at Cafa Art Info, the installation transforms at different stages of the day, citing firsthand that, “…there is dew in the petri dishes in the morning; light is gentle in the morning and the glass is transparent; when there is direct sunlight at noon, the installation is entirely placed in the sun, strongly reflecting, which is in contrast to the dry surrounding environment, making people feel cool; the setting sun is blocked by the house in the evening, so the glass reflects the light from the sky, seen as backlit, it looks like the scales of a huge creature stranded on the beach, with rich tones; the whole glass hills is self-luminous at night, producing a transition effect changing from semi darkness to darkness.”  This daily, natural transformation of the installation not only is a quickly-viewable message of transition, but it’s meditative qualities also call to attention how both art and architecture can effect a viewer’s ability to feel at peace in a home, garden or museum experience.  (via myampgoesto11 and CAFA Art Info)

Spooky Portraits Capture Death And Ecstasy


Through careful manipulation, Silvia Grav‘s ethereal black and white images capture a psychological realm where death and fear lurk around each corner, a world beyond the material where rich blacks and blinding white tones evoke a heightened anxiety and ecstasy. In her spooky portraits, the self is blurred by smoke and transparency, as if transported from the page by some unknowable force.

As with the works of the prolific photographer Francesca Woodman, Grav’s images are often set against the backdrop of the domestic space. The house, associated symbolically with the female, is no longer seen as safe or comforting; deteriorated walls and filthy floors cannot protect or contain inhabitants, and a woman rises ghostly towards a lit window. In another eerie image, the sleeping female is disturbed in sleep, her delicate floral bedding overcast by a foreboding shadow whose presence forces her to cover her breast and frightfully clasp at her back. Later, she is shown to be levitating, reaching out for the comforts of her mattress.

Within the terror of the images lies a sort of ecstasy, a dreamy surrender to instability and fright. The woman subject, surrounded by smoke clouds that seem to melt away her flesh, clasps her skeleton hands in rapturous prayer. Her nighttime slumber is seen in mysterious light, and she basks in its warmth, seeming to wriggle with delirium so that the majority of her body is pulled out of the frame.

The impressive work seems to invoke the memory of troubled women artists who came before. In one poignant image, the artist seems to mirror the famous profile portrait of Virginia Woolf by the photographer George Charles Beresford, down to the dark, pulled-back hair, the white blouse, and the ominous shadow below the eye. Contributing to the dialogue on femininity and mortality began by the likes of Woodman and Woolf, Grav adds a unique and potent modern voice. (via Colossal)

Zach Lewis’ There Are No Sins Here

Zach Lewis lives and works in New York. He has just released his book There Are No Sins Here which is a 6″ x 9″ 110 page survey of work from 2010-2012. Lewis describes it briefly saying it is a “A narrative driven documentary photography book reflecting the sentiment of contemporary American life.” It serves as an honest portrait of a twenty-something taking in the city of NY during a time of political unrest. We see the push and pull of organized religion and ideologies of faith. Current events like the death of Osama bin Laden and Steve Jobs are presented as a reminder of the speed and influx of information in our current culture. Joy, paranoia, frustration, and hope are presented in equal measure. You can pick up a copy here

Ryder Ripps Paints A Distorted View Of A Popular Instagram Model

ryder ripps paintingryder ripps paintingryder ripps paintingryder ripps painting

In Ryder Ripps’ latest series he creates an emoticon character out of an instagram model who has 340k followers and the last name Ho. How funny. The paintings are digitally distorted versions of pix that appeared on the model’s popular social media site. In these pieces, Ripp captures our somewhat skewed vision of what’s important in life . Ho’s number of followers attest to the fact that people just want to vege out and watch an attractive person prance around in gym clothes. (She also has a casual clothing line.) Despite the subject matter, the canvases are well done and hold your attention. They peep into Francis Bacon’s distorted popes and powerful men sentiment. And despite a grotesque appeal offers a somewhat fresh perspective on the medium of painting.

Ryder is no stranger to interesting projects. One called “Art Whore” was especially riveting. For this piece he placed a Craigslist ad looking for sex workers. For their hourly rate he asked them to spend an hour with him in a room at New York’s Ace Hotel and draw. He chose a man and woman who both had very distinct but different results from the session. The woman produced abstract pictures which resembled feelings and emotions. The man created a literal essay in words and pictures of his life as a prostitute. Both enjoyed the experience immensely and the hotel known for its own funky art projects offered to promote it. (via wefindthewildness)