Get Social:

Les Deux Garcons

LesDeuxGarcons14LesDeuxGarcons2

I can not help but find myself indescribably drawn to taxidermy in all shape and forms, especially unconventional artwork as with the case of Les Deux Garcons. They seem to have a surrealist, Gothic freak-show aesthetic all combined into one. There’s something horrific about manipulating the animals’ lifeless, frozen forms into eternal works of art against their will…it reminds of the scene in Chronicle of Narnia where you walk through the White Witch’s front yard, and poor Mr. Tumnus and all the other forest animals have been turned to stone sculptures in various states of fear and despair by her ghastly spell.

Advertise here !!!

Lucy McRae

Lucy McRae
Lucy McRae straddles the world of fashion, technology and the body. Classically trained as a ballerina and architect, her work inherently is fascinated by the human body and how behaviour constantly shapes the ways in which our body interacts with the world and vice versa.

Advertise here !!!

Documentary Watch: Amy Casey

A nice short documentary on Cleveland artist Amy Casey. Hear Amy talk about her inspirations, references, and watch her work in her intimate sized studio. Watch the full documentary after the jump.

Ben Skinner

i got your back

Ben Skinner, a Vancouver based artist, has a knack for presenting ideas and phrases in the most visually relevant, and witty way. The “I got your back” dominoes kills me, so clever!

Justin Amrhein’s Imaginary Schematics

Justin Amrhein is a whole new kind of mad scientist. Gathering inspiration from the way things are made, Amrhein crafts a new breed of machinery, in the form of an engineer’s schematic illustration, to provoke thoughts around the function of these beautifully complex creatures.

 

Iight Installations by Luzinterruptus

 

Luzinterruptus is an anonymous urban arts group based in Milan that uses “light as a raw material and the dark as [their] canvas.” They’ve created huge, luminous garbage installations and commemorated torn-down public pools with fiery blue liquid. Their works never stay on the street too long: “they take less than one hour to disappear”. A really nice project started, apparently, for the sole purpose of beautifying and adding a little wonder to their city. (via)

Studio Visit: Alexandra Grant’s Bold Text Paintings

As part of our ongoing partnership with In The Make, Beautiful/Decay is sharing a studio visit with artist Alexandra Grant. See the full studio visit and interview with Alexandra and other West Coast artists at www.inthemake.com.

Alexandra’s studio is in the historic West Adams district of Los Angeles, just a short distance from Koreatown and Downtown. From the outside her building looks like a non-descript, kind of funky commercial space that in no way expresses how big her studio actually is. The place is huge with a cavernous feel to it— cold, shadowy, and resounding with echoes, it heightened every one of my senses. Everything I took in seemed exaggerated: the damp air, the bright fluorescent lights, the vibrant colors of Alexandra’s paintings, and the steady rhythm of her voice. Long after our visit those impressions continued to linger, as did much of my conversation with Alexandra. She is a force to be reckoned with— her brain is agog with ideas that she expresses in a continuous flow of conversation, often jumping from one thought to the next as they wildly run through her mind. Her energy is infectious and inspiring, and makes you feel like the world is in fact full of promise, insight and adventure. Many of Alexandra’s paintings are collaborations with writers and their ideas, which makes sense because she appreciates the complex nature of dialogue: the exchange of both concepts and language, the act of deciphering and interpreting, the twists of subtext, and the inevitable losses in translation and how we make up for them. By borrowing writers’ poetic language she utilizes the format of dialogue to create “conversation” between image and text. In engaging text and image this way, the work then becomes a liminal space that challenges the viewer’s ability to perceive and hold both elements at once.

New(ish) Work from Minimalistic, Idiosyncratic Dutch Artist Parra

Let’s check in with Dutch artist/designer/illustrator mogul Parra for a second. What’s that dude been up to lately (besides a show at SFMOMA)? Well, looks like he’s still killin’ it with his idiosyncratic minimalistic style. Birds, babes, food, and his signature palette still in full force- good to know he’s not slowing down. His style has always had an element of vintage 70s illustration, but not that of this planet. If you’re craving some Parra imagery for your own consumption and can’t afford a limited run print or sculpture, you can head over to his clothing/design company and score somethign there.