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Joel Rea’s Paintings Collide Natures Wrath With Human Relationships

Joel Rea painting

Joel Rea painting

Joel Rea paintingFascinated by the natural world, Joel Rea paints the pulsing elemental forces of our planet interplaying with human relationships formed in our society and consciousness. Driven to explore universal meanings around the human condition, Joel is also interested in depicting the underlying inner forces which drive human behaviour. He presents these narratives visually through the use of vivid surreal landscapes, seascapes, animals and self portraiture. Joel also harvests ideas from his dreams and draws subject matter from his life journey and his own personal struggle to become a professional painter, a life long ambition which was many times nearly derailed by the unpredictable turmoil of his years coming of age as a young man. (via)

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Tadashi Moriyama

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I found Tadashi Moriyama‘s work during Bushwick Open Studios this past June and fell in love with the intricacy and obsessive mark making process that is evident in each ink and gouache work. Each painting is rife with apocalyptic imagery rendered in countless repetitions of a few motifs including waffle-like gridded squares forming architectural structures and tubular wobbly connectors slithering in and out of buildings and bodily orifices.

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Designer Creates a Different Silhouette of His Daughter Every Week

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Graphic Design can often get the bad rap of lacking soul or substance.  Designer Brent Holloman, however, created a series with heart.  When his daughter was born in 2012 he decided to create a new silhouette of her each week.  Ranging from illustration to sculpture, each week brings a profile of his little girl.  These are a sampling of the many pieces he created.  Holloman comments on the series:

” With the arrival of our first baby girl there is one thing I hear all the time… “They grow up so fast.” So I decided to start a project where I can mark the stages of her growth by doing a silhouette of her each week for her first year (or as long as I can keep it going).”

Brandon Bird’s Subversive Pop Culture Paintings

Brandon Bird lives and works in Los Angeles. Utilizing an array of pop culture references he creates disarming paintings. The work is whimsical, dark, and subversive in equal measure. One piece depicts a child on Halloween dressed as Philip Seymore Hoffman’s nurse character from the film Magnolia. Despite being downright bizarre it is a hilarious reminder of the cheap Character Costumes of old that consisted of nothing more than a plastic mask and an image of the character on a sticky vinyl wardrobe. Another painting shows the eccentric actor Christopher Walken in the middle of creating a robot in his garage. A visual such as this embodies the joy that permeates through Bird’s hysterical pop culture laced paintings.

We Are Made Of Flowers: Marcelo Monreal Fills Celebrity Portraits With Beautiful Floral Arrangements

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Marcelo Monreal is a graphic designer and creative director based in Santa Catarina, Brazil. In a project titled Faces [UN] Bonded, Monreal opens up the faces of actors and models and fills them with flowers. Although some of them might be hard to identify from within the ferocious bloom, you’ll see the faces of Julianne Moore, Cara Delevingne, Christopher Walken, and more. By splitting the model’s/actor’s faces along the fine curvatures of their jaws and down the center, the artist accentuates their physical features. The flowers reveal a deeper, more internal vitality.

The idea for Faces [UN] Bonded comes from a very important memory for Marcelo: an insight passed down from his late mother. As he explains in this interview with Dettona, when his mother was dying, they worked in the garden together, and she told him “we are made of flowers” (Source). Marcelo now continues this understanding of human vulnerability and beauty by filling photos with floral arrangements. He seeks to “think, experiment create, recreate, learn, destroy, rebuild” in his work, encouraging all burgeoning artists to explore their potential in a similar, imperfect, and blossoming ways.

Visit Marcelo’s Facebook page and Instagram to view more.

Culinary (Visual) Art From Hong Yi

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Artist and architect Hong Yi emphasizes ‘art’ in culinary art.  Her simple white dishes are plated with food.  However, this is more than a simple meal.  Only using these white dishes and food ingredients, Hong Yi recreates famous works of art, light hearted scenes, and pop culture icons.  The project began as 31 days of creativity in March – an exercise she began to encourage more creativity every day.  Each day Hong Yi would create a new piece and post it on instagram.    [via]

Klaas Van Der Linden Painting Update

We first featured Klaas Van der Linden’s dark and mysterious paintings last year. I’m happy to say that Klaas is back with a new batch of work that raises the bar with intricate detail, epic narratives, and beautiful brush work. Just check out the patterning and eyeballs on the image above… Amazing!

Wide Load- Incredible Photographs Of Overloaded Vehicles In China

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Overloading, as you can clearly see, is a serious problem in China; about 80 percent of trucks (or any means of transportation used to transport goods) are overloaded. These vehicles have been damaging the country’s already-crumbling highways and they have been the cause of collapsed bridges in the past. This bizarre collection of photographs,published by China Foto Press, reveal the heartbreaking reality of the statistics, as we see here the incredible amounts of junk that these tiny transportation vehicles carry on a daily basis. Although amusing and puzzling at first, these colorful and peculiarly beautiful compositions beg for awareness and possibly a chance for change.

“Highway and bridge tolls in China are too high for transportation companies. Sometimes, they can account for as much as 20 percent of the total expense. Therefore, many companies carry too much freight to try to make trips more profitable and compete with rivals.” – Cui Zhongfu, secretary-general of the China Federation of Logistics and Purchasing.

 

The rivalry over transportation companies has cost China about a dozen collapsed bridges each year. For instance, Qiantang River in Hangzhou, a bridge that was designed for vehicles weighing only 30 tons and trailers weighing 55 tons, was abused by truckers carrying loads in excess of 100 tons. The bridge finally gave in and collapsed in July 2011, when a 129-ton truck tried to cross it. In the same month, a bridge in Yancheng and another 301-meter steel-arch bridge in Wuyishan, Fujian province, collapsed. Both bridges had been built about 10 years ago. (Via Amusing Planet)