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Amandine Urruty’s Bizarre Monochromatic Drawings Depict Adorably Frightening Dreamscapes That Will Haunt You In Your Sleep

urruty4 urruty3 urruty2 urruty1

Artist Amandine Urruty’s new series of drawings delivers a collection of artworks worthy of illustrating an Alice in Wonderland picture book . Urruty’s new work is mainly done in pencil or graphite and in black and white. She depicts a mildly disturbing combination of children’s book and cartoon characters, monsters, as well as a wide selection of pop culture elements. The way she depicts nightmarish scenes and sometimes works in triptychs is reminiscent of the work of Hieronymus Bosch and, in a way she has delivered a contemporary, almost cute version of his work.

Her work unfolds in the details: she places familiar yet odd items in the backgrounds and in the corners of her pictures and you have to look closely to see the intricacy of her work. For instance one of her drawings includes a Victorian house next to a waterfall with what resembles a hotdog in a boat floating down the waterfall. Her illustrations are also sprinkled with little sheet ghosts which give her drawings an additional Halloween touch. The ways in which she makes use of the shadows in her illustrations give her work a sort of gothic touch. Upon close examination of her work, in one of her pictures, a collection of small cultural artifacts can also be seen: little men in masks with painted chests are huddled around a young girl sitting on a log while their compatriots are in the background holding up a brain with arrows planted in it.

Urruty’s wide eyed, monochromatic characters border the psychedelic, with their dark, blank stares and oscillating bodies. Her use of black and white lines and shading gives her work an extra otherworldly touch, in such a way that it almost looks like it comes straight out of the 1960s. She also says that her works contain a certain number of personal items, which gives her work an added touch of mystery and depth. Her combination of characters, albeit mildly terrifying still have a little touch of playfulness which gives them the potential to serve as illustrations in a children’s book.

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Carl Kleiner’s Sexy Fruit

I am really enjoying Stockholm based artist Carl Kleiner’s photography.  His sex series is especially fun. Who knew fruit could be so naughty!

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Next Day Flyer Presents: Seeing The Black Dog


Michael Massaia’s haunting new series Seeing The Black Dog is based on a saying truck drivers use to describe hallucinations that occur as a result of sleep deprivation during cross country runs.  When they see the “black dogs” scampering across the highway they know to pull over and get some sleep.   The moment they make that decision is when Michael sneeks up to their trucks while they’re in the cabs sleeping and captures the moment the dogs melt away (it’s also the moment Michael tries not to get his ass shot off).  All of the images were taken between the hours of 2am and 6am along the New Jersey Turnpike.


Today’s article is brought to you by the rack card printing company offering quick turnaround times and great prices, Next Day Flyers.


15 Examples of How Modern Hip Hop Artists Borrowed Fashion Styles From 16th Century Paintings

B4 - XVI

B4 - XVI

B4 - XVI

B4 - XVI

The tumbler B4-XVI berforesixteen has made a hilariously clever and all too accurate comparison between contemporary Hip Hop artists and paintings made before the 16th century, making everyone involved look quite ridiculous. When you first look at the fashion styles of centuries old paintings, you would not think anyone today would ever dream of looking like that, let alone a celebrity. However, if you think about it, what kind of person would wear flashy jewelry and frivolous fur coats? Well, Hip Hop artists! Their extreme amount of “bling” and often baggy clothing somewhat resembles the capes and jewelry of royalty depicted in classic paintings.

What makes the comparisons so on point is not just the uncanny similarities of clothing and accessories, but the position, stance, and even the facial expressions of both parties. I mean, what a lucky coincidence that Kanye West happened to be standing next to a priest for a hilarious comparison between himself and a painting of saints! Not to mention this goes perfectly with his infamous “Yeezus” complex. One aspect of Hip Hop style is missing from the series of 16th century paintings is the notorious “grill.” But don’t worry; there is instead a painting of two men proudly displaying their teeth while “mean-mugg’n” the viewer. This series of entertaining resemblances just goes to show you that every fashion style will make a comeback! (via Fubiz)

Wallpaper Company Feathr Breaks The Mold And Collaborates With Artists To Create Bold Designs





Now you can decorate your home/office/studio with wallpaper that strays from the norm. A company called Feathr has started collaborating with artists to make statement with bold wallpaper design that will inspire your daily routine. Definitely staying within the parameters of textile design the company now represents a large group who think outside the box. Some of the collaborators include Peter Judson who takes art deco in his brightly colored patterns to arrive at a striking motif and Russell Marshall who pulls directly from Warhol and uses a gun and the check bought with it for pop effect. Using both abstract and figurative patterns the placement and use of color pushes these new designs just a tad off the grid thus allowing for more free-flowing ideas. By joining up with different artists the company allows for more conversations to occur between design and fine art which references Andy Warhol’s pop and consumer ideal. This middle ground allows more people to see the work of these artists and also show how their ideas can be used in a more commercial sense.

The papers are all reasonably priced and can be bought on the Feathr website. They are currently becoming a cool commodity in the design field. (via designmilk)

David Rochkind Documents The War Against The Mexican Drug Cartels

mexican drug cartels

mexican drug cartels

mexican drug cartels


David Rochkind’s Heavy Hand, Sunken Spirit is a project about Mexico’s new normalcy: day-to-day violence and corruption due to Mexico’s violent drug war since the rise of former Mexican President Felipe Calderon.

Since his time in office, the battle against the country’s drug cartels has become a priority, and in consequence more than 50,000 people have been killed and kidnapped

The cartels in Mexico are ruthless, meting out an awesome brutality where heads are rolled into crowded discos and dismembered bodies are abandoned on busy streets.

Rochkind images intend to “frame the violence as a symptom”, as opposed to the problem. He is interested in documenting Mexico’s present situations in an unfiltered manner; he says, “when documenting this conflict it is important not to reduce what is happening to a series of nearly anonymous images of carnage that could be happening anywhere.” His honest imagery is not just about violence, though. In nutshell, these photographs tell a story, a present of people whom find themselves in these horrid yet mundane situations. The photograph’s rawness intend to offer a snapshot of history, essentially a set of documents that can be referred to later on, in order to answer questions and redefine Mexican culture in the future.

I chose to work on this project because it represents how a grand, intense struggle can be transformed into quiet, daily dramas that are woven seamlessly into the lives of those involved. I am drawn to extreme crises that become internalized, even routine, to the communities that they touch.

This work was published as a monograph by Dewi Lewis Publishing in December 2012 and was honored by PDN, photo-eye and Professional Photographer Magazine, as book of the year. The project has also been exhibited internationally, including at the Museum of Contemporary Photography, the Southeast Museum of Photography, the Blue Sky Gallery and others. (via feature shoot)

Sponsored Video: Land Rover Inspires Parkour Performers

land rover parkour

Land Rover has always married the love of the outdoors with high-end performance. So it should come as no surprise that they would team up with a group of talented Parkour athletes for their latest video. If you’ve ever seen any of the impressive wall jumping videos on Youtube, the moves of these four Parkour athletes will look familiar. In the latest Land Rover commercial these four Parkour athletes use their skills to conquer the great outdoors, scaling the same terrain that Land Rover is known for maneuvering.  The athletes scale boulders, flip over rivers and complete rolling flips off the edge of cliffs with grace and seeming weightlessness in unison. With much the same fluidity that you might see a prima ballerina execute her dance moves on the stage, these four athletes glide through the woods, over the rocks and in between blades of tall grasses- effectively turning the outdoors into their own stage.The Parkour athletes’ fluid movements and feats of balance echo Land Rover’s ability to navigate any terrain from the gritty urban streets to the country and beyond.

This post is sponsored by Land Rover


Jeffrey Stockbridge Photographs Philadelphia’s Urban Decay

Jeffrey Stockbridge Urban Decay

Urban Decay Photography

Urban Decay

During the 19th century, Kensington Avenue in North Philadelphia was a symbol of abundance and prosperity. It once was nationally recognized as one of the leaders in the textile industry. Today, Kensington Avenue is abundant in prostitution, drug lords, drug addicts, and poverty.

Photographer Jeffrey Stockbridge, intrigued by Kensington’s history and current situation, creates Kensington Blues, a collection of photographs that capture the essence of the infamous North Philly Avenue and its urban decay by focusing on its daily activity, its inhabitants, and its cluttered,dirty landscapes in decay.

Stockbridge deliberately chooses to work with a large format (mostly used in early photography), not only for its obvious perks in quality, but also, it seems, to juxtapose the histories of two very different times in Kensington Avenue. With a 4×5 camera, Stockbridge slows down the current hectic and toxic flow in Kensington in hopes of shining a light onto his subject’s day-to-day struggles and their surroundings- making us, the viewers, reconsider our quick judgments about them and what they do on a daily basis.

The photographer records new found observations though images, audio recordings and journal entries. (Via Ignant)