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Bizarre Musical Parody Featuring Shia LeBeouf Turns Into A Full Scale Production

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Shia LaBeouf has our attention once again, but this time he is only a placeholder in an enormous and masterful creative production. While the video is a parody of sorts of Labeouf’s celebrity status, the real focus is on just how incredible all of the different elements come together. A mixture of music, comedy, dance, narrative and performance, the stage piece is definitely a spectacle. You just need to look at the credits on the Youtube page to see how many people were actually involved in making this strange idea come to life.

The actual song, and score was written by Rob Cantor, and was made a reality with the help of The Gay Men’s Choir of Los Angeles, The West Los Angeles Children’s Choir and The Argus Quartet. Not only did he write the song, and draw up a complex and riveting narrative of what happens to our star character, but Cantor also oversaw the construction of Shia LaBeouf heads for the dancers to wear; he stood in on the choreographed dance rehearsals, and co-ordinated a behind-the-scenes video log.

You can see just how intensive this project was, and the lengthy process it took to get the musical to the final stages. If you are still left wanting more Shia LeBeouf after watching the musical number, visit Cantor’s Facebook page for many more interesting videos on how exactly this bizarre masterpiece came to fruition.

Photo by Zach Callahan

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Photos Of Plexiglas Pierced By Bullets Resemble Exploding Galaxies

Deborah Bay Deborah Bay

Deborah Bay

As part of our ongoing partnership with Feature Shoot, Beautiful/Decay is sharing an article about photographer Deborah Bay.

I began thinking about The Big Bang after seeing a sales display of bullet-proof plexiglas with projectiles embedded in it. The plexiglas captured the fragmentation of the bullets and provided a visual record of the energy released on impact. In deciding to explore this concept further, I also was intrigued by the psychological tension created between the jewel-like beauty and the inherent destructiveness of the fragmented projectiles. Many of the images resemble exploding galaxies, and visions of intergalactic bling sublimate the horror of bullets meeting muscle and bone.—Deborah Bay

 

Houston-based photographer Deborah Bay gives us that interesting mix of creating a beautiful visual to comment on a darker issue. The Big Bang addresses the steadfast affection America has for its firearms. The topic is especially relevant for the native Texan, who lives in a state that has an estimated 51 million firearms. The images were made in Bay’s studio after law enforcement professionals from the Public Safety Institute of Houston Community College shot at sheets of plexiglass.

Bus Stop Made From 100,000 LEGO Bricks Pops Up In London To Celebrate The Year Of The Bus

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With Britain celebrating the Year Of The Bus (#YOTB), three major companies teamed up to build an amazing life-sized LEGO bus stop on the Regent Street in London. Constructed from over 100,000 LEGO bricks, it features even the most intricate details and has a personal hashtag (#LEGOBusStop).

Opened to public just a few days ago, this bus stop already received huge attention from city’s visitors and locals. On Sunday, it served as a checkpoint for vintage bus parade and showcased models from the 1820’s up to the most modern Routemasters. According to the TfL spokesman, the bus stop was meant to stay in place until July 15th but the term may be prolonged.

“Many thousands of people pass along Regent Street each day and we hope the new shelter will bring a smile to the face of even a hardened commuter”,–Leon Daniels, TfL’s Managing Director of Surface Transport.

The LEGO bus stop project was initiated by Transport for London and developed together with LEGO and Trueform, a company that specializes in public transport hardware. It took around two weeks to build and appears on the outside of a legendary toy store Hamley’s.

Brendan Leach’s Night Crawlers

Brendan Leach is a Brooklyn based artist who makes comics and illustrations about teenage night crawlers, back alley thugs, pterodactyl hunters, and characters who have a propensity for exploration.

The Handmade Psychedelic Marbles Of Mike Gong Are Out Of This World

Mike Gong Mike Gong Mike Gong Mike Gong

Mike Gong

These beautiful marbles from Portland based glass artist Mike Gong shows us he hasn’t lost his marbles at all – he has definitely still got them and, in fact, wants us to buy them. The talented man hand crafts colorful, intricate marbles filled with psychedelic swirls, bubbles, swooshes, and flecks. Ranging from about 13mm to 50mm, his marbles, which he calls ‘Acid Eaters’ are incredibly detailed and contain amazing miniature worlds within.

Gong’s marbles are full of abstract colors and forms, and he really exploits the materiality of the glass. Only with this particular material – and Gong’s patience and skill – can he achieve the depth, transparency and luminescence we see. You can purchase them here to look at them up close and in depth yourself. (Via Juxtapoz)

Michael Light

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San Francisco-based photographer has a few different ongoing projects, but the one I like the best is the tentatively named “The Inhabited West.” The series consists of aerial photographs parts of the American landscape: “pursuing themes of mapping, vertigo, human impact on the land, geology, and various aspects of the sublime.” Some interesting points on how we’ve constructed our world around nature, and how the two interact.

Rashaad Newsome At Marlborough Gallery

Rashaad Newsome’s obsessively-handmade collages in customized antique frames comprise a visual vocabulary that combines high neo-Baroque style with low pop-advertising imagery. His richly-detailed compositions form a kind of Rosetta stone for hip-hop culture. Newsome culls familiar images of luxury goods from glossy consumer magazines: sports gear, jewel-encrusted brooches, rings, watches, furs and yachts, which he then uses to create contemporary coats of arms set against meticulously-patterned backgrounds. See Newsome’s work from October 20th-December 3rd 2011 at Marblorough Gallery.