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Noah Conopask Dramatic Cinematic Eye

Noah Conopask‘s photography is dark, intriguing, and looks like stills from a dramatic movie. Every once in awhile you get a nice break from the darkness and into the light. Check out his blog here.

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Interview: Sean Pecknold

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Sean Pecknold is a Seattle based artist who has created some incredibly poignant videos and animations. The video “White Winter Hymnal” for Fleet Foxes–a sort of time-turning-backwards retrogression via a magical crank — recently caught our eye here at B/D. Sean recently discussed that, as well his other works, inspiration, and  process behind creating his magical shorts.

 

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Porcelain Figurines Depicting Power Struggle As Sexual Tension

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Europe-Europe is a series of porcelain figurines created by the collective AES+F – a group made up of the artists Tatiana Arzamasova, Lev Evzovitch, Evgeny Svyatsky, and Vladimir Fridkes.  A first quick glance they may seem like typical decorative figurines.  However, it soon becomes clear that something is terribly/wonderfully wrong.  The collection, exhibited together in a case, seems like an orgy – people caught in various sexual situations.

Yet, something else makes this series especially interesting: the characters are often thought of disliking or even hating each other in real life situations.  A Neo-Nazi strokes the locks of a Hasidic Jewish boy, sweat shop workers pet their capitalist supervisor, a police officer fondles a rioter.  While these can easily be read as a playful and optimistic depiction of global unity, a sinister feeling lingers on these figurines.  It seems as likely that these hateful feelings are depicted as a sexual tension.  Political power struggles are illustrated as sexual power struggles.

Asia Kepka Tells A Beautiful Animal Love Story Through Photographs

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Boston-based photographer Asia Kepka did not have a master vision for where her horse and squirrel photos would go, but she didn’t need one: once she began shooting, they quickly took on a life of their own. This project, now titled “Horace and Agnes: A Love Story by Asia Kepka,” has become a beautiful collaborative project between Kepka and writer Lynn Dowling, both of which play the characters. Since the projects inception the cast has grown as they have added friends and other characters into their story.

“Once we gave them identity, their story began to unfold. They met through random circumstance and their love for each other is literally blind. They exemplify a fairy tale of what would be like to fall in love with the right person…just because.

Horace and Agnes, along with their friends, are inspired by people and stories from our past and present. Sometimes by family members and sometimes by strangers we have encountered. The photographs are memories brought to life once again- recreated with as much detail possible to make the viewer become immersed in this magical and unique world.”

Opening on September 25th, this photo series will be on view at the Griffin Museum at SoWa in Boston.

(Excerpt from Source)

New Video by Sean Pecknold

A few months ago I had the pleasure of interviewing artist Sean Pecknold regarding his video work. He has a nostalgic, bittersweet charm to his works that evoke a feeling similar to discovering a sepia-toned portrait of your great grandparents and a dried rose from an undiscovered dusty cigar box in the attic. His animations often complement the music in strange ways, not creating direct narratives that “spell out” the lyrics of the song, but rather riff off the themes within the music in unexpected ways. He recently just completed a new video for Elvis Perkins in Dearland, a slowly sinking band presiding in a lit cave above a murky, watery world of ancient lion sculpture…haunting, beautiful and strange.

Kristina Knipe’s Heartrending Portraits Of A Painful Struggle With Self-Harm

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In her recent series I Don’t Know The Names of Flowers, photographer Kristina Knipe examines her struggle with self-harm by documenting the marks and personal effects associated with the trials of others similarly suffering. Through the vulnerability of her subjects– some of whom she knew and others whom she found over Craigslist– the artist reveals a richly specific portrait of her own injury.

Inspired in part by the work of Alessandra Sanguinetti, Knipe situates her subjects within a decidedly natural world. Against a backdrop of wildflowers and floral patterned sofas, her portraits courageously reveal a tension between the beatific organic landscape and the angled, mechanical patterns of scarred and restitched flesh. The title of the work amplifies this sense of alienation, laying bare the tragically unfulfilled desire to connect with the simple purity of a budding rose.

Gently evoking poignant feelings of nostalgia and loss, this notion of innocence and corruptibility is explored further by Knipe’s expertly uncomfortable use of childlike imagery. In Andrew’s Dress, she presents a tiny article of clothing that for a grown man serves an unknowable purpose; as it wavers in the wind, viewers are forced to confront permanent blood stains. Similarly, a Raggedy Ann doll splays herself almost obscenely in a bed, revealing the words I Love You carved into her chest in red. For a particularly devastating image, Knipe shoots a page in a journal, revealing the terrifyingly pained visage of a girl scribbled in crude and childish lines.

Amidst this haunting sense of innocence lost, Knipe’s sprinkles her photographs generously with a dangerous sense of addictive ecstasy. Her photographs are decadent, richly colored and tonally mesmerizing. Scarred flesh is gleaming and sensual, and a beer can explodes orgiastically over a blissful subject. With relentless passion, Knipe invites viewers into a private world, colored by highs and lows that are equally difficult to navigate. (via Feature Shoot and Tischtography)

Grotesque Rings Made Of Actual Human Skin Are Utterly Fascinating

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For your consideration: a $500,000 ring mounted with a tanned sliver of hairy human skin. The piece, titled the Forget Me Knot ring, is the creation of boundary-pushing Icelandic fashion and jewelry designer Sruli Recht. For these one-of-a-kind works of art, Recht had a 110 by 10 millimeter a strip of his skin surgically removed from his abdomen; the artist then salted it, tanned it, and embedded it on a gold ring.

The work, though grisly, carries with it a raw sexual potency. Its title refers, of course, to marriage, or “tying the knot;” in this way, the piece is unabashedly intimate, tying literal bodily fleshiness with the idea of love and intimacy. The ring’s beauty lies in its refusal to be pretty; its hairy, gray, and it’s gruesome physicality operates as a strangely comforting promise that two people might become “one flesh.”

The medicinal and scientific references of the rings strangely reinforce this idea of devotion. Complicating the relationship between jeweler and client, the ring comes with a certificate of authenticity, providing DNA validation that the slash is in fact the artist’s, and a DVD graphically documenting the making of the ring, including the surgical removal of flesh. With these items, Recht creates a personal catalog of both his molecular and artistic existence, offering himself to a potential wearer in uncomfortable yet touching ways.

Recht’s other rings, composed of rare black diamonds and other precious stones, remain authentic to his gritty, viscerally demanding aesthetic. Take a look, and let us know what you think! (via Oddity Central)

brian tolle’s Soft Houses

Brian Tolle’s soft silicone sculptures of mass produced houses are juxtaposed with a variety of found objects resulting in hilarious juxtapositions and unusually delightful pairings.