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The Indoor Deserts Of Álvaro Sánchez-Montañés

Alvaro Sanchez-Montenes photography1 Alvaro Sanchez-Montenes photography2

The images of photographer Álvaro Sánchez-Montañés‘ series Indoor Desert seem like elaborate installations.  However, he actually found them this way.  These buildings were once part of a town named Kolmanskop in southern Namibia.  It had been situated near a gold mine.  When the mine ran dry it was abandoned as was the town.  The strong winds quickly overtook the town filling its buildings with the sand of the nearby Namib desert.  The homes now filled with desert instead of families only emphasizes each photographs loneliness and underscores the immense power of nature.

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Paper Artist Charles Clary Carves Intricate Patterns Onto Your Favorite Retro Movie Boxes And Board Games

Charles Clary- Paper Sculpture With Found Object Charles Clary- Paper Sculpture With Found Object Charles Clary- Paper Sculpture With Found Object Charles Clary- Paper Sculpture With Found Object

Charles Clary, a paper artist, has begun a body of work calling to the nostalgia of the 80s and 90s. Taking VHS boxes from old movie favorites and the containers for childhood games, like Operation and Monopoly, he cuts into the cardboard and weaves through a layered paper sculpture.

The concept is interesting although it is not absolutely clear what purpose the paper layering is serving in reference to the found items. While I find Clary’s work to be provocative and unique in most of the settings he has explored, in this specific scenario, the nostalgic entertainment pieces and the paper formations seem more to detract from one another as opposed to enhancing or adding to the viewer’s experience.

As explained in his artist statement:

“I use paper to create a world of fiction that challenges the viewer to suspend disbelief and venture into my fabricated reality. By layering paper I am able to build intriguing land formations that mimic viral colonies and concentric sound waves. These strange landmasses contaminate and infect the surfaces they inhabit transforming the space into something suitable for their gestation. Towers of paper and color jut into the viewer’s space inviting playful interactions between the viewer and this conceived world.”

Jenny Fine Reanimates Her Dead Grandmother

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American artist Jenny Fine creates Flat Granny, a life-sized cardboard cut-out of her grandmother. The artist is interested in creating a tangible ‘thing’ that would resemble her dear, and very influential relative. With this cut-out, she attempts to extend a relationship beyond death. Apart from the cutout, Fine goes a bit further and develops a more’ carnal’ approach to the cut-out of her grandmother…

In an interest to reanimate her still image, I turned Flat Granny’s photographic body into a costume.

The bizarre, yet endearing idea is inspired by Victorian traditions of post-mortem photography, as well as the novel concept of a Flat Daddy/Mommy , photographic cut-outs of deployed soldiers for their children/ family while the soldier is away at war.

The photographs you see here feel and look surreal. However, there is no way to escape these vibes when you are looking at an object that in essence represents the absence of someone dearly missed and loved. This project is personal, but it also goes deeper than just a moving gesture from a loving granddaughter. It brings forth the realities of our attachment to the physical world- and the physical body, as well as the lengths we would go to in order to fill that void we feel when we’ve lost someone important in our lives.

Can something like this do the trick? Or would it be just plain weird and inappropriate?

Andreco

 

Andreco, negli Italia (that’s Italian for “from Italy”… I hope) recently had a project where he showed videos created from paper-cuts as a live performance “shown in a very old palace in Bologna citycenter, (‘RE ENZO Palace’, the old King Enzo building.),” according to the artist. I love the simplicity and stiffness of the stop motion, and the morbid beauty of the figures.

 

Josh Evans

Josh Evans, Lotus Face

Josh Evans, Lotus Face

Josh Evans is a Los Angeles based illustrator who works his pieces from varied sources of inspiration; a music icon, the meaning behind a word, an historical yet obscure event. I admire Josh’s illustrative methods which change from one work to another… he seems to choose a medium best fit for the story of his subject. Don’t miss Josh’s recently published zine titled Rankle Jones, and the curious history of how this publication came to pass.

MONICA MENEZ

Monica Menez’s photographs are everything you’d ever want in fashion photographs with the perfect mix of sex ladies, playful themes, and creative ingenuity.