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Peat Duggins

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Watercolor, gouache and ink paintings by once Austin, TX now Cambridge, MA artist Peat Duggins.  The detail images are telling of a cartoon-apocalypse and I have to say I’m not a morbid or pessimistic person, however I enjoy dooms-day movies and I’m growing fond on such themes in artwork where humans are gone and nature takes over.  This is different though, it’s sweet.

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Hijacked Billboards Used For Political Street Art

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The Billbored series of artist Dan Bergeron (also known as fauxreel)  undermines the all to common visual language of advertising.  His hijacked billboards, particularly his series featuring Carl the Plastic Baby, challenges passers-by to consider what they see more deeply.  Like much of his work, Billbored investigates identity, consumerism, and the places they intersect.   Carl the Plastic Baby, for example, playfully offers an an easy alternative to actual children.  A website accompanying the billboard offers visitors the opportunity to buy a “child” of their own – their very own Carl delivered to their home.

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Shi Jindian Wire Mesh Motorcyles

Chinese artist Shi Jindian work at first glance may look like an xray of your favorite motorcycle or car but it in fact is creating out of a complex woven wire mesh. Shi Jindian process involves wrapping the wires around every square inch of the object and then carefully removing or destroying the object, leaving only its wire mesh skeleton. (via toxel)

Christopher Boffoli’s Giant Food World And Its Tiny Residents

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Photographer Christopher Boffoli continues his popular his Big Appetites series.  The series of photographs captures tiny people living in a giant culinary world.  These inhabitants explore, work, and even get into trouble with their huge food surroundings.  Despite its whimsical appearance, the series has a more serious grounding.  Big Appetites reflects America’s complex relationship with food.  The consumption of food – not only by eating it, but by reading and watching television about it – is ubiquitous, as if we lived in a giant world of food.

Rebecca Ward’s Intricate Tape Installations

Rebecca Ward lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. She uses miles of colored tape to transform white exhibition spaces into dynamic rooms with vibrant intersections. The nature of the medium results in a temporary transformation and adds to the importance of in-person viewing. From her bio: “Ward frequently works with tape installations whose primary concerns are colour and space. Tape adheres to the gallery’s ceilings, walls and floors converging with the architecture. This perceptual play of colour, texture and light is set into motion by the viewer’s interaction with the work.” (via)

Jonathan Zawada’s ‘Over Time’ Series

The Over Time series by Jonathan Zawada depicts landscape topographies in bright colours, evoking other fantastical worlds. However, the work was actually derived from graph data of earthly landscapes, which Zawada modelled in 3D to create this beautiful work. Each piece was displayed with the graph data nearby, as seen in the last image showcased here. Absolutely stunning.

Polar Vortex- Andy Goldsworthy’s Ice and Snow Sculptures

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Although most of America (currently enduring one of the worst winter cold snaps in nearly two decades) would like to ignore this fact in for favor of bundled layers and heated blankets, sometimes even the dire cold, snow and ice can provide the tools and inspiration for those who brave it’s elements.  Famed land and installation artist Andy Goldsworthy (previously here and here) has often utilized ice, frost, snow and frozen earth to create his trademark land interventions. And rather than avoiding the elements, Goldsworthy is only able to create these delicate and precise sculptures by embracing the cold.

In Goldsworthy’s 2004 documentary, Rivers & Tides, several scenes document the difficulty in attempting to harness the cold’s elements. One scene shows the artist, braving the winter elements for hours at a time in finger-less gloves (so as to be able to properly feel and hold the materials) fusing together icicle chunks together with warm water, holding them in place while they freeze together into naturally-made though unnatural shapes. The smallest temperature changes, light, and even chance cause the ice sculpture to collapse, repeatedly, which is all part of Goldsworthy’s process. Says the artist, “Movement, change, light, growth and decay are the lifeblood of nature, the energies that  I try to tap through my work. I need the shock of touch, the resistance of place, materials and weather, the earth as my source. Nature is in a state of change and that change is the key to understanding. I want my art to be sensitive and alert to changes in material, season and weather. Each work grows, stays, decays. Process and decay are implicit. Transience in my work reflects what I find in nature.”

Goldsworthy’s process is only captured through the use of photographs, and the often detailed notes (below) which the artist uses to document the difficulties and triumphs of each individual piece.

The Falling Garden

 

Gerda Steiner & Jorg Lenzlinger’s falling garden installation at the 5oth Venice Biennial in 2003 took a normal garden and exploded it into millions of floating pieces of debris.Installed in the Church of San Stae on the grand Canal, visitors were invited to lie on a circular bed under the doge’s tomb and stare up into the garden in the sky.