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Studio Visit: Stas Orlovski


I recently stopped by the studio of LA painter  and B/D featured artists Stas Orlovski. Stas and I have been trading studio visits for quite a while and it’s always fun to see what he’s up  to. Not only is his work brilliant but he has a studio that anyone would be jealous of. It’s more tropical oasis than studio with amazing landscaping surrounding the converted garage studio. More  finished paintings and work in progress after the jump.

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Inka Järvinen

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Inka Järvinen is an illustrator/designer from Helsinki.  Järvinen works mostly in detailed collage’s, her output is dark, as she draws inspiration from the old sci-fi aesthetic of the future in the 1960’s and 1970’s. I love her illustrations and simple use of color.

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Hubert Duprat’s Flies that Create Precious Works of Art

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It’s difficult to tell who is the artist in this work.  Hubert Duprat began working with caddisfly larvae in the 1980’s.  The caddisfly live in streams and use bits from their natural surroundings to create a casing to live in.  Typically this is made up of pebbles, wood, plants, and so on.  Duprat moved these caddisfly larvae to a new surrounding and delicately removed their outer shells   The caddisfly than used the precious metals and stones of their new home to create strangely glamorous shells.  It’s interesting to note the particular materials and patterns the larvae tend toward.  The flies’ “creativity” and Duprat’s conspicuously absent hand in work makes it extremely intriguing.

Marwan Sahmarani


Montreal based artist Marwan Sahmarani’s work has a loose brush work aesthetic that I find charismatic. He paints epic scenes of warriors in the midst of  battle. His work is a reflection of his Middle Eastern origins. Sahmarani states that his oil paintings, drawings and performative works  are linked to the mediums themselves, and their support in the face of sociopolitical problems.

Sam Moyer

In a recent attempt to find contemporary artists making fresh, black and white imagery, I fortunately stumbled upon Sam Moyer‘s, washed out, subtle abstractions. These images, composed of bleach and ink, are soft and elegant and fair in scale. I want one. Many more after the jump!

Paul Koudounaris’ Photos Of Human Skeletal Remains Adorned With Opulent Costumes, Precious Jewels


The photographer Paul Koudounaris has made a name for himself by photographing the mysterious dead: mummies, skeletons, ossuaries.The enchanting subject of his recent project Heavenly Bodies are the never-before photographed relics of Europe’s Catholic churches, said to be the bones of Christian martyrs. At their discovery in 1578, these remains were taken from underground tombs and enthroned as objects of worship in place of earlier saintly relics ravaged by the Protestant Reformation.

The opulent adornments that surround the remains (i.e. wigs, gemstones, gold lace) reflect the decadence of the late Middle Ages, when churches ornamentation became more elaborate and extravagant. Dressed like royals, these saints suggest an afterlife filled with heavenly pleasures. Against rich, dark fabrics, the precious metals shine brilliantly; within a tight frame, Koudounaris shoots from below, simultaneously capturing the splendor up-close and elevating the sacred remains to a slightly higher plane.

Although he exalts his subjects in this way, Koudounaris’s images remain touchingly human; while some images capture gigantic, enthroned figures with the utmost deference, others focus on small, humble details. A gap where a tooth once sat or a clenched skeletal hand serves as a poignant memento mori, reminding viewers of the human deaths that happened long ago. The mysterious remains, of whom no one knows the full story, are seen ambiguously, both as a suggestion of an enraptured afterlife and a morbid recognition of mortality and decay. Take a look at the mesmerizing images below. Heavenly Bodies is available in print here. (via Colossal and Hyperallergic)

Someone Made A Living Replica Of Vincent Van Gogh’s Severed Ear


We all know the story of Vincent van Gogh’s ear, an organ that the artist is rumored to have severed from his own head in a fit of lovesick madness. For her project Sugababe, the artist Diemut Strebe has recreated the living ear of the legendary Post-Impressionist. Teaming up with scientists and using an advanced 3D printing technique, Strebe constructed the true-to-life organ from a sample of the late artist’s DNA found in an envelope that he had licked in 1883 and live cartilage from the ear of Lieuwe van Gogh, a grandson of the painter’s brother. The replicated ear, now on view at The Center for Art and Media in Karlshruhe in Germany, is kept alive by being suspended in a solution laced with nutrients.

Strebe’s installation includes a microphone into which viewers can speak. The sound is then carried to the ear, which hears speech as a crackling noise that is projected through speakers for all to listen. For the artist, Sugababe is a physical manifestation of Theseus’ paradox, wherein the ancient Greek hero was asked if a ship would remain the same if all its individual parts were replaced with new ones. Here, Strebe asks if this clone of an ear might in fact be considered the same ear worn by van Gogh. Tragically unable to respond the viewers who speak to it, the organ seems startlingly alien. Though it is composed of the same elements as the original ear, it lacks the humanity and the romance we ascribe the artist whose molecular biology it shares.

Given the tragic history of the artist, Strebe’s work carries with it a sense of loss and poignancy. Where the living van Gogh was unappreciated— reviled, even—in his time, here even his tiny organ is preserved with the utmost care, his body transformed into a valuable work of art in and of itself. (via Design Boom and The Daily Beast)

Masterpiece On The Runway- Viktor & Rolf Create Dresses That Are Made Out Of Framed Paintings

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A runway of living masterpieces was the idea behind the couture “Wearable Art” collection.
Viktor & Rolf had models walk around wearing human size canvases for their Fall 2015 couture show. The girls were coming out wearing a denim apron and a framed canvas at first white and then punctuated by paintings inspired by Dutch golden age painter Jan Asselijn. As the show went on, both designers appeared on stage to undress a model out of three, delicately taking off the painting they were wearing as a dress and hanging it on a hook off a wall.

The show was held at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris, a location known for it’s contemporary art and where designers have previously held their show. (Rick Owens, Phillip Lim and Maison Rabih Kayrouz to name a few). Viktor & Rolf gave an updated version of a fashion show, instead of having regular models strutting up and down the runway, the designers gave a performance. Trying to get as close to an art performance, blending art and fashion and demonstrating once again their genius in pattern making. Watching the video (see below) will make it much more clearer that this has nothing to do with fashion per say.

The designers are experimenting wearable art. Instead of trying to prove that fashion is art they are subtely implying that fashion is inspired by the excellence of art. By taking the clothes off the models and hanging up the garments they are claiming that fashion is humble and vulnerable compared to art. There is something naive and touching about this show. Fashion designers following the footsteps of art performers, clearly inspired and admirative of the art world.

By the end of the show, art collector Han Nefkens acquired one of the pieces to donate to the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen in The Netherlands (via Dezeen).