Get Social:

Jane Masters’ Intricate Abstractions Made Using Scratchboard

Jane Masters lives and works in Providence, RI. Using the scratchboard technique that originated in the 19th century she creates highly detailed abstractions. Using nothing but knives and sharp tools the art of scratchboard is creation through removal. In Masters’ case what remains are dizzying op art spirals and ribbons of intersecting waves. The stark black and white adds to the timelessness of designs that often resemble microscopic magnifications of viruses, cells, and other things found in biology. (via)

Advertise here !!!

Seiko Kato

694

Brighton, England’s very own artist Seiko Kato’s work is something you think you’d find at an antique boutique. But looking closer, it’s not necessarily something you would buy for your grandmother’s birthday.  Her work is Victorian era meets contemporary design. Kato’s inspiration lies in Victorian medical books, old Victorian drawings and encyclopedias, and Victorian paraphernalia. Kato is also a collage artist and illustrator.

Advertise here !!!

LA TEX CITY


Eastside Angelinos are probably familiar with the dead-end leading to an overpass in Chinatown on Yale Street (I know I’ve made the repeated mistake? miraculous discovery? of turning onto Yale and thinking it was a through street many a times)- but less have probably seen it used for anything not related to shady drug deals (can anyone confirm this assumption?).

 

Get Rid of White Walls Collective is focused on bringing fine art out of galleries and into non-traditional spaces: public, domestic, industrial, nautical, etc. These events are meant to reveal the unique identity of these sites to the surrounding public, offering a place of public interaction via the provocation of the urban landscape.

 

Wizards in Winter Shred Lights


Christmas Lights 2009 – Wizards in Winter

Dude. Just. Whoa. Heavy metal/wizards in winter/hesh lights.

The Quiet World Of Song Myung-Jin

There is a erie stillness in the work of Korean artist Song Myung-Jin.

 

Shadow Street Art Portraits Using Kitchen Strainers

Isaac Cordal sculpture8 Isaac Cordal sculpture3

Strainers are tools not often seen outside of the kitchen, much less in the art studio.  However, artist Isaac Cordal puts them to use in a series of street installations titled Cement Bleak.  For the series Cordal sculpts human faces into the mesh of the hand held strainers.  The strainers are then inserted into the ground.  Sunlight or streetlights pass through the strainers and project a shadow portrait onto the sidewalk.  The nature of strainer’s mesh allows for a strangely realistic face from several angles of light.

B/D “Submit Your Artist” Contest Winner!

We asked for your favorite artists, and we got them! Thanks to everyone who participated in our recent contest. In case you didn’t hear, we asked our readers to submit their favorite artist for a chance to win a Beautiful/Decay Apparel t-shirt and see their artist of choice on the blog!

We’re excited to announce the winner: Corey Thompson, who submitted the Portland based artist Mark Warren Jacques! We absolutely loved his poetically metaphysical triangulations. More of his images after the jump.

However, there were so many amazing entries, we decided to dole out some honorable mention blog spotlights- check back every day this week for some runners up!

Crystal Morey’s Thought Provoking Sculptures Address Issues Of Humanity And Nature

totem4 totem3 totem2 totem1

In her latest series of ceramic and underglaze sculptures entitled Habitats Collide, artist Crystal Morey underlines the role and impact of human beings on nature in the most melancholic sense. Her work represents human beings with stern looks on their faces “encased” in the bodies of animals. Morey states that the animals she has chosen for this series are either endangered or extinct, which adds to the thoughtful aspect of her project.

She states that her work is inspired by the Byzantine, Renaissance and Ancient Egyptian eras. It also bears a strong resemblance to Native American totem art, due to the visible ridges in the pieces which are designed to look like fur as well as the merging of human and animal forms. Her work, being inherently totem like is thought provoking on many levels beyond its aesthetic composition.

Her representation of human beings as both a part of nature and a problem for nature is in line with many current debates concerning the role of humans as linked to the impact we have had and continue to have on our environmental surroundings. She states that her work seeks to address “current psychological, environmental, and cultural feelings”, which she does perfectly through the facial expressions of the human components in her work. She hopes to create a dialogue centered on technology, progress, and, on a greater scale our relationship with nature.