Get Social:

Saddo

1060111248102408

Saddo is an insanely detailed illustrator from Berlin, Germany. He graduated from the University of Art and Design in Cluj Napoca, Romania, and currently specializes in bright, intricate, and surreal characters. His mediums include acrylic paint, watercolor, pencils, and marker pens while his canvas of choice is white paper, but  has been known to work on street surfaces and wood.

Advertise here !!!

kelly Falzone Inouye’s Sitcom Watercolors

kelly Falzone Inouye’s Sitcom series are part of an ongoing series of watercolors depicting sitcom characters from the 1970s and 80s. They highlight the archetypal, quirky characters mythologized through syndication. The medium of watercolor is extremely nostalgic and sentimental. In using this medium in its loosest, most watery form to depict fictional characters, Kelly examines issues of portrayal vs. portraiture.

Advertise here !!!

Lothar Hempel

Lothar Hempel

Best known for his series of painted portraits, Lothar Hempel goes far into the idea of art as three dimensional- he plays the role of director in arranging space in order to create a script. Mixing larged diamond shaped photomontages, sculptures and painting, the whole with flashy colors and geometrical shapes, “Kats, Nerves, Shadows & Gin” plays with the mind of the viewer, to whom he offers to create his own story, in relation with his own psychological character.

B/D Featured Artist: Winnie Truong’s Piles Of Hair

Winnie Truong’s magical colored pencil drawings are things of wonder. Her work simultaneously reads as beautiful, grotesque, and bizarrely funny. We can’t get enough of Winnie’s work and we hope you can’t either. If these 6 images aren’t enough to quench your thirst then hop over to the B/D shop and get your hands on our latest book Beautiful/Decay: Class Clowns where we feature an in-depth 12 page interview with Winnie with over a dozen full color images for you to feast your eyes on!

 

Last Chance To Subscribe & Get Book 6!

Hey B/D Member! As you may have heard, the Beautiful/Decay book series highlights the most extensive interviews, and in-depth features with upcoming artists today. And in with the latest arrival of Book:6 upon us, this is your last chance to start your subscription and not miss out. With 164 ad-free pages of image heavy articles and collectible art inserts, this hand-numbered book is a source of inspiration you can re-read time and time again. So don’t, wait until it’s too late,subscribe today!

 

Jiyong Lee Carves Fragmented, Geometric Glass Blocks That Represent Cell Division And Growth

Jiyong Lee - Sculptures Jiyong Lee - Sculptures Jiyong Lee - Sculptures Jiyong Lee - Sculptures

Jiyong Lee is an artist and educator based in Carbondale, Illinois, who works in the medium of glass art. In a series titled Segmentation, Lee has created fascinating, geometric glass blocks that metaphorically examine life science. Mirroring the processes of cell division and growth, each sculpture is divided into fragments that represent “cells, embryos, biological and molecular structures—each symbolizing the building blocks of life, as well as the starting point of life” (Source). As a whole, they are firm structures, much like the proverbial “building blocks”; but internally, they are irregular and segmented, symbolizing the varying growth rates and beautiful asymmetry of organic life.

The glass Lee has chosen to work with varies in its translucency, which is significant to his theme. Sometimes the fragments are see-through; in other places they are dense and clouded. For Lee, these conditions of visibility represent “what is known and unknown about life science” (Source), for although modern science seeks to fully comprehend the workings of life, there will always be an unreachable mystery within. The internal haze also represents an unknown future for cells as they live and continue to change.

Visit Lee’s website to view more.

Bernardi Roig’s Sculptures Walk Towards The Light

Bernardi Roig - Mixed MediaBernardi Roig - Mixed Media

Bernardi Roig - Mixed Media

We are comparable to moths. This is what I think Bernardi Roig is doing with his mixed media pieces: allowing us to see our own attractions to the glowing lights brought forth with the Information Age. From computers to iPhones to tablets– our desire is instinctual or . . . mindlessly animalistic. I’m thinking here also about near death experiences: going towards the light. Remember that iconic scene from Poltergeist? Carol Ann. This too. It’s not about where our bodies gravitate or evolve, but how we speak to the light and what we leave behind as we travel towards it.

Marc Simon Frei Captures Electrical Currents And Tiny Lightning Bolts In His Shocking Photography

Marc Simon Frei - Photography

Marc Simon Frei - Photography

Marc Simon Frei - Photography

Marc Simon Frei - Photography

Are you ready for some shocking art? Somewhere between science and art, Marc Simon Frei tests their boundaries by combining these two worlds into a stunning series of photographs titled Tesla Sparks. The innovative artist creates electrical currents with a Tesla coil and captures their iridescent glow with his camera. A Tesla coil, invented by engineer Nikola Tesla around 1891, is an electrical resonant transformer circuit that produces both high and low voltage. Frei manipulates this electrical current in fascinating ways by arching a variety of different objects to the coil. This produces mesmerizing bends in the current, resembling tiny lighting bolts. In fact, Frei plays off this likeness by staging miniature lighting storms of his own. He creates clouds out of wool and constructs a scene so that these electrical currents seem to shoot out of his “clouds.”

To add an even more striking visual, he adds an element of color by illuminating his clouds with different colored LED lights. As if the bright, purple and blue glows erupting from the Tesla coil weren’t awe-inspiring enough, his eerily beautiful clouds fill you with a surreal wonder. The intense hue that the electricity emits captivates us, reeling us in to every frame. There is a powerful tension between the undeniable beauty of the many bolts of voltage lighting up each photograph and the known dangers behind high-voltage. We are drawn to its attractiveness, but are aware of its dangers. The photographer has created a unique, dynamic series that demonstrates spectacular colors and patterns made from electrical currents. (via This is Colossal)