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Rania Matar’s Photographs Of Teenage Girls In Their Bedrooms

Rania Matar-Photography

Rania Matar-Photography

Rania Matar-Photography

My room as a teenager was a sanctuary-my only safe place. My room was me, more specifically though, it was what I wanted to be at the moment. I wanted to be as bold, tough and flawless as my favorite musicians on the magazine cutouts on my wall. Truth is, I wasn’t any of those things. In fact, I was timid and self-conscious, an anxious girl who found it hard to make it through some days as I struggled with an anxiety disorder.

Every girl battles with herself and the burden of the transitions that come along with the teenage years; whether good or bad, her room is just an imprint of what she is going through.

Photographer Rania Matar’s recent collection of photographs, A Girl in her Room, explores the teenage girl in her habitat (her room), to further understand the origin of a teenager’s way of being. Matar wanted to capture the universality of teenage behavior by photographing girls in the U.S and the Middle East- both cultures she is very familiar with.

I became fascinated with the similar issues girls at that age face, regardless of culture, religion and background, as they learn to deal with all the pressures that arise as they become conscious and aware of the surrounding world wherever this may be.

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Paintball Pop Art

It’s fun to see how something so violent, like paintball guns, could be used to make something so beautiful like Marilyn Monroe. I mean the skills and accuracy to execute this painting are amazing though… awesome teamwork guys! I am sure Andy Warhol would be oh so proud.

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Steven Dupont’s Images Of New Guinea

Over the past six years, Stephen Dupont has traveled to Papua New Guinea, photographically documenting its changing face and the powerful impact of globalisation on the fabric of Melanesian society. From the effects of violence and lawlessness in Port Moresby to the westernization of traditional society in the Highlands, Raskols and Sing-Sing is an in-depth study of cultural erosion as well as a celebration of an ancient people.

Carsten Höller’s Interactive Installations

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Carsten Höller’s work intends “to trigger the organic responses that underpin the structure of learned behavior, to unbalance the rational mind…Using his training as a scientist in his work as an artist, Höller’s primary concerns relate to the nature of human perception and self-exploration. He has undertaken many projects that invite viewer participation and interaction while questioning human behavior, perception, and logic. His “laboratory of doubt,” embodied in objects ranging from carousels and slippery slides to upside-down goggles, often contains playful, hallucinatory or darkly humorous overtones in order to provoke experience and reflection.” – from Gagosian Gallery. Read more about Höller’s work and his 2011 exhibition at the New Museum here.

[hu]Man vs. Machine



As his name hints, [hu]Man vs. Machine delivers work created with traditional materials in order to mimic what can be done with the computer. His work is very enjoyable and ranges from ink drawings to paintings to installations.


Roseline de Thélin’s Brilliant Holographic Light Sculptures Shimmer With Ghostly Figures

Rosaline-de-Thélin-art Roseline de Thélin   Roseline de Thélin

Roseline de Thélin, a Spanish artist, creates stunning, larger-than-life holographic light sculptures and installations. Her projects feature what she calls, “Homos Luminosos,” or luminous beings. Using scientific properties of light such as reflection, conduction, refraction and transparency, Roseline creates these transparent, mystical bodies that look like they are hovering in mid-air. These fantastical works are inspired by astronomy, quantum physics, definitions of perception, and other-worldly-creatures.

Thélin uses a wide range of materials including mirrors, wires, chains, fiber optics and quartz crystals in her work. She combines the use of digital technology and exhibition space, as she works on producing these mystical beings by creating illusion and deception effects withing specific sites. The empty spaces between the light points serve to create a loose definition of what real space is. Are we looking at something that truly exists? Or is it just as illusion? Furthermore, is the visibility of the illusion a justification for its existence in the tangible world?

Her latest holographic sculptures, presented in FREQUENCY 2011, the Lincoln Festival of Digital Culture at the Saint Swithin Church in Lincoln, England, are a reflection on life, illusion and the evolution of mankind. This series features a series of these ‘light beings’ that exist in a parallel, timeless dimension.

(via Feather of Me)

Awesome Video Of The Day: Lovemachine

A galactic space ride courtesy of Electro band Columbus and visual symphony conductor The Crystal Beach.

Borondo Uses Unorthodox Materials Such As Smoke, Hay And Water To Create His Street Art Portraits

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street art

Borondo is an unconventional street artist, using a broad variety of materials to make his murals that are mostly portraits. Both his technique and choice of situ are excitingly unexpected. In a few of his works, he has used the smoke from candles to create the markings of the images. Though it would be safe to assume that this is a difficult technique to have control over, he is able to mold the forms into recognizable imagery.

Another strategy he employs is using reflections in water to be a part of his images, and sometimes even as the main event. In one, he creates the image of half a face on bails of hay – something he had done at an even larger scale beforehand – and planted grass in a pool of water to complete the second half of the face. It’s a nice contrast between the dried hay that looks as if it was burnt, and the living grass in the pool of water. Although in this one, the reflection completes the image, in the upside down mural portrait, the artwork is meant to be viewed right side up in the water, at least considered at an equal importance to the painted image. (Via I Need a Guide)