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Awesome Video Of The Day: Origin Of The Beginning

Levi Van Veluw’s eerie Origin Of The Beginning installation draws from his own childhood memories to thematically and narratively develop his own brand of self-portraiture. Creating 3 “rooms” covered with more than 30,000 wooden blocks, balls and slats the spaces feel both like wooden prison cells and as metaphosr for the artists darkest memories. Watch a video of the installation after the jump.

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Nelson Garrido

Nelson Garrido

 

Right off the bat, Venezuelan Nelson Garrido states the following: “To know limits is to begin to know that one does not have limits.” His work, brash and unapologetic, throws together Catholicism and American consumer culture, yielding incredibly fascinating results. Actually, to call his photographs “fascinating” would be an understatement. We’ll go with “riotous” after seeing Jesus depicted with three jumbo penises!

 

And for those with a strong stomach, check out one of his blog posts entitled “La Gruta de la Virgen.” You have been warned! This project in particular goes along with his passion for showcasing concepts deemed unacceptable by society.

 

 

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Impossibly Teeny Tiny Crochet Animals To Melt Your Heart

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Imagine your favorite teddy bear and or snuggly stuffed animal shrunken down to fit atop your fingertip, and you have the magical creations of Su Ami, an artistic company in Vietnam devoted to creating delightfully miniature crochet animals. The family run business includes only 5 expert craftsman who work to imbue the tiny woven creatures with unique and touching personalities.

Because of the animals’ itty bitty frame, each stitch is noticeable, highlighting the careful handmade nature of the work. In each turn of the yarn, we imagine the delicate movements of human fingers, and each being becomes impossibly precious. Heightening their dearness is the fact that delightful creatures are so easily lost; like microscopic pets, their vulnerability inspires us to cherish them and hold fast to their tiny bodies. In this way, the pieces recall the nostalgic yearning of a child for his toy.

Despite their smallness, each creation has an impressively distinct character.  With the slightest opening of the mouth, a gecko exudes a curious and playful attitude; a long-beaked bird stares in awe of her own crochet egg. Two squirrels tell a story, peering up at the sky in unison; similarly, a parent elephant watches over her child, whose plastic button eyes seek approval. A lion turns his head with a poignant frown, as if startled by his own size. All animals great and small, from the littlest snail to the tallest giraffe, inhabit the same magical space, cautiously yet courageously exploring the large world they miraculously inhabit. (via Demilked)

Another Day At The Plant…

The life of a creative director never seems to end with countless hours spent waiting for sampling. Here is a visual diary via my Iphone.

First you have to burn endless amounts of screens for each color.

Artist Of The Day: Hannu Karjalainen

Hannu Karjalainen’s photos of paint covered figures are absolutely amazing. I love how the paint takes on the texture and detail of the fabric and brings out every single stitch.

Awesome Video Of The Day: Supernatural Creator (Jesus Pixel)

The history of creation ala 8-bit video games!

Animation by Mareike Ottrand and music by Daniel Brenner

Eyal Gever’s Explosions Dissected On Acrylic Panes Reveal The Layers Of Destruction

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Orthographic Slices of Nuke Sim from Eyal Gever on Vimeo.

Artist Eyal Gever mixes two and three dimensions to capture the movement of destruction.  For these installations Gever begins with a three dimensional model of an explosion that is split into ten layers.  The layers are transformed into inkjet prints on acrylic, hung, and lit from underneath.  Combining the ten layers gives the piece a strange sort of depth and seems to freeze time.  Viewing the sculpture, though motionless, you begin the anticipate the motion and unfolding of the explosion as if it were a running algorithm.  Gever explains the technology and concept behind his work saying:

“My sculptures are created from software I have developed. I am influenced by the destructive impact within our environment. Uncontrollable power, unpredictability and cataclysmic extremes are the sources for my work. They inspire, fascinate and remind me of the constant fragility and beauty of human-life. Beauty can come from the strangest of places, in the most horrific events. My art addresses these notions of destruction and beauty, the collisions of opposites, fear and attraction, seduction and betrayal, from the most tender brutalities to the most devastating sensitivities. I oscillate between these opposites.  Using my own proprietary 3D physical simulation technologies, I have developed computational models for physical simulation, computer animation, and geometric modeling. Combining applied mathematics, computer science, and engineering, my work captures and freezes catastrophic situations as cathartic experiences.”

Check out the videos above and after the jump to see how the three dimensional images are sliced.

Dominic Wilcox And Four Other Artists Upcycle and Illuminate Found Objects

Dominic Wilcox

Dominic Wilcox

Sarah Frost

Sarah Frost

Gabriel Dishaw

Gabriel Dishaw

Robert Bradford

Robert Bradford

Through the metamorphic conversion of discarded paraphernalia given a second life, art created from materials otherwise destined for a landfill has turned waste into resource. In a conscious reflection of a recycled object’s inherent value as a cultural statement, the fragmented disarray of salvaged goods conjoin as a reflection on the surplus of consumerism. Computer relics and plastic toys from the 1990’s resurface as jarring, three-dimensional works that reestablish a value beyond their initial introduction as cultural commodities. Extending the life of goods long since forgotten, the immortalization of a wastefulness that continues to swell stands as not only a poignant reminder of the ecological decay resulting from our consumption, but the opportunity to revisit and remake otherwise quotidian, superfluous goods.

Working predominately, if not entirely, with upcycled goods, the following artists create stunning installation and sculptural works that are a visual whirlpool of texture, color and line.

Featured artists include Dominic Wilcox, Sarah Frost, Robert Bradford, Gabriel Dishaw and Elisabeth Higgins O’Conner.