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Stacey Rozich’s Masked Myths

Seattle based illustrator Stacey Rozich’s work is littered with vibrant tribal patterns and drawings based on folklore. She brings an animated, lively, modern perspective to stories of myth. Her pattern work and line work are nothing short of exhilarating, playing reference to southwestern art, and tribal marks.

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LA Artist Adi Putra’s Euphoric Images Of Youthful Bliss Save Us From Cold Season Melancholia

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Los Angeles based artist Adi Putra takes you to an ethereal dreamland embedded in enigma, euphoria and that quintessential Southern California aura of bliss. It is no mystery why he frequently works with musicians such as Moby, L.A. Witch, Kimbra and The Vivian Girls — his style is fluid, loud, reverberating and ultimately undeniably cool. His work acts as the embodiment of warmth and mischievous freedom. It is images like these that save our souls from wilting during these bleak and bone chilling winter months. In moments of cold season melancholia, Putra reminds us, through an alluring controlled chaos, what true creativity and passion feels like. With titles such as Spring Fever, Valley of the Wind, and Dreamcatcher, his work pictorially creates that undeniable feeling of youthful excitement. That one you get sitting on a porch, drinking a beer as the sun starts to rise, filled with a quiet thrill for what’s to come.  Almost like a vintage, punk rock Ryan McGinley, Putra is able to create striking images that demand attention through glorifying the beauty in youth and purity of nature. His work, romanticized with quiet tones of sepia matched with hints of ultraviolet hues of hippie energetic galore, hits every note aesthetically thrived for. Each piece is truly blissful, sinister and perfectly raw.

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Alexander Semenov’s Unbelievable Photographs Of 222 Species Of Deep Sea Worms

Alexander Semenov

Alexander Semenov

Alexander Semenov

Alexander Semenov

Russian underwater photographer and biologist Alexander Semenov has created a new series of images that brilliantly captures a variety of deep sea worms known as polychaetes, some of which may be unknown to scientists. Semenov has spent many hours diving in places like the White Sea and Great Barrier Reef in Australia in order to get up close and personal with this creepy, crawly sea life. Altogether, Semenov photographed 222 different species of polychaetes that are currently being studied and documented by scientists.

Semenov first began photographing sea life for fun while organizing the White Sea Biological Station underwater projects. Using basic photography equipment, he’d get a few good shots every few months, and this eventually encouraged Semenov and his team to acquire more professional equipment. Semenov now produces images like the ones seen here, as well as a series of jellyfish and tiny creature images are all just as stunning. (via colossal)

Kyle Bean’s Eggshell Sculpture

Kyle Bean’s sculptures are made out of everyday objects such as straws, baked goods, jello, and even matchsticks. His latest eggshell sculpture doesn’t necessarily answer the question “What came first the chicken or the egg” but it sure is beautiful.

Pedals & Prints

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Cyclists, Bikers, Riders, Sliders and Pedal Pushers – Rejoice! This Saturday, from 6-9pm, is the opening for “Pedals & Prints”, a print show dedicated to bicycle-themed art at Crewest Gallery.  The list of artists is longer than any bike ride you could ever manage on two wheels, so you don’t want to miss this huge group show.  Just to name a few – Two Rabbits Studios (who also curated the show), Dethkills, Hit + Run, Dale Dreiling, Hammered Company, Will Manville, Swank One, Dash 2000 Fidel, and sooo many more! Check out a sneak peek of the show after the jump!

10 Street Art Images You Need To See

Sam3

Sam3

Sam3 (detail)

Nychos

Nychos

This week’s images bring us surprising works of beauty, detail, and wit.  Sam3 brings a silhouette mural with an innovate use of the fence posts (I’m guessing located in rural Spain) – the piece references the expulsion of the Moors from the Ricote valley in the 16th century.  We also have a giant new mural in Poland from Sainer of the ETAM crew. Alexis Diaz also give a new mural, an elephant/octopus creature a week in the making comprised of thousands of detailed brushstrokes.  Stenciler DS smartly rebuffs the buffer – after one of his stencils was painted over DS replaces it with a portrait of the “remover man”.  David de la Mano‘s is a poetic and carefully detailed mandala-esque piece.  Ludo expounds on his theme of contrasting technology and nature with an impressive tulip-rifle mural.  Nychos new piece in San Francisco finds a tiger literally jumping out of its skin.  Finally, we have an awesome collaboration between artists POSE and Revok that followed their dual exhibit at the Jonathan Levine Gallery.

Awesome Video Of The Day: Human Castles

In the city of Tarragona, Spain, castellers gather every two years to see who can build the highest, most intricate human castles. It requires astonishing strength, finesse, and balance.

Tania Dibbs’ Timeless Sculptures Of Barnacle Infested Waste

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Aspen Valley based multimedia artist Tania Dibbs has created an epic series of barnacle infested sculptures. Her work, generated with various materials such as resin, paint and found objects, acts as a timeless collection of discovered underwater treasures. The beauty of her pieces lay in the simultaneous precision and playfulness within the materiality. Each sculpture demands a second look, an investigation, a questioning of origin and time. Dibbs‘ work, which ranges well beyond sculpture, also touching media such as oil and encaustic, holds a constant theme of questioning nature and man’s relationship to it. With pieces such as her denatured alcohol containers, rusted waste cans, and bottles being infested by, if not entirely submerged, in tentacle-barnacle-algea reminiscent formations, she forces perspectives on how and why. Where it is the made man objects that take on the action of being disturbed and manipulated, it is, in fact, the object that does not belong. Dibbs transforms every day garbage into fragile and precious works of art, concurrently creating an environmental debate. Her work, she describes, portrays an “unstoppable nature, creeping along and encrusting and covering” (via Hi Fructose).

Tania Dibbs has a show coming up @ De RE Gallery in Los Angeles.