Daniele Papuli’s Eloquent And Experimental Paper Sculptures

mise_en_mpise_1_bassa2okoka1_o panta-rei-ok

Through a process of experimentation and manipulation, Italian artist Daniele Papuli creates sensual paper sculptures that evoke feelings of quite nature and grandeur. Active as a sculptor since 1991, Papuli’s work has developed through various stages of materiality and process. His early pieces were focused on stone, wood, and plaster, however, in 1993 he learned to make paper, and by 1997 he began solely focusing on the potential of paper’s materiality. He explains his admiration for the material. He states; “according to the way in which it is moved, touched, cut, paper offers me numberless sensorial, visual and tactile suggestions engendered by its new structure. My work proceeds by returning these experiences, and searching about sculpture, its physical character, its connection to space.” In order to fully understand the material he turned to paper handling and production. He tested and trailed myriad combinations of mincing different types of paper, mixing them with herbs, grounds and colors. This process in which permits the artist to become intimate with his martial allows his work to have a distinct personality that exudes a certain essence of delicate vibrancy. He explains;

“sometimes the sculpture shows a sort of inner energy, the bending of the different sheets suggests the trend and development in the round. I am extremely interested in these manifold variations. Sometimes the shapes become paper monoliths faceted in many light lamellae where the different layers are like veins and the chromatic variations of the surface, yellowing as paper does in the sun, follow the metamorphosis by which the sheet traces back to wood, to the tree, to its primary mother-matter.”

Advertise here !!!

Christina West’s Candy Colored Spray Painted Spin On Classical Sculpture

juxtapoz_west01 juxtapoz_west02 juxtapoz_west03 juxtapoz_west05

Through the use of bright color, spray paint, and clever distortions, Atlanta based artist Christina West’s work puts a fun, humorous and contemporary spin on a classical aesthetic. West sculpts busts and full figures that begin as traditional looking white ceramic pieces, yet are matched with moments of almost ice cream cake or jawbreaker like slices. Her process begins as the classic method of creating a casted sculpture does; she creates her portraits based on a desire  for likeness. However, once the piece comes out of the mold, West gives herself a freedom to play and likeness no longer becomes her purpose. Instead, she aims to, as stated in the gallery statement for her upcoming show at CG2 gallery in Nashville, TN, “highlight the alienation that I inevitably feel with others because their thoughts and feelings are inaccessible; I can never be in another head as completely as i am in my own” (source). Her work tends to highlight poses and facial expressions of distress or discomfort, allowing her work to, as she states, nod to an existential notion of being, of confusion, isolation and, perhaps more simply, just being human. However, it is her parings of neons and day glows that take the heaviness and maybe overtly dramatized nature of sculptures such as these, and transform these works into something relatable. It is their absurdity that makes them more human, more relevant. West’s works takes a traditional type of sculpture and truly makes it fun and beautiful, but perhaps more importantly, absolutely her own. (via Juxtapoz)

Advertise here !!!

Christopher Chiappa’s Installation Covers The Gallery Walls With Over 7,000 Oozing Fried Eggs

Chiappa - Installation

Chiappa - Installation

Chiappa - Installation

Chiappa - Installation

Christopher Chiappa has been casting sculptures of eggs in plaster for the past five years and now they have taken on a life of their own. His work,“Livestrong” uses 7,000 eggs in a gallery installation and makes us wonder if we should be worried about an imminent egg invasion or if he’s simply putting egg on our face.

The pieces, which are the outcome of countless drawings and photos, have been painstakingly attached to Kate Werble Gallery (NYC) and look like an infestation climbing down walls, oozing across floors, and dripping from ceilings. But the Gallery provides us several ways to access the significance of the work, not all of which include a perilous plague. Perhaps the eggs are the energy of a large group, a non-threatening crowd, a recommended high-protein “Livestrong” recipe, or a nod to the “this is your brain on drugs” advertising campaign.

Made With Color Presents: Francisco Alarcon Ruiz’s Digitally Carved Paintings

Francisco Alarcon Ruiz Painting 6_565x784 Francisco Alarcon Ruiz Painting 5_565x784 Francisco Alarcon Ruiz Painting 7_565x424 Francisco Alarcon Ruiz Painting 8_565x424

Premier website builder Made With Color and Beautiful/Decay have teamed up again to bring you exclusive artist features. We show you exciting artists and designers who use Made With Color to create a clean and modern website. But it doesn’t just help artists create a minimal, mobile-responsive website; Made With Color also allows them to do it in only a few minutes without have to know any coding.This week we’re excited to share the work of Made With Color user Francisco Alarcon Ruiz.

In Francisco Alarcon Ruiz’s work one finds a surprising harmony between nature and technology. Ruiz brings digital techniques such as routers, 3D printers, CAD and animation software and seamlessly blends them with wood and other natural materials to create abstractions that look like a futuristic archeological dig. The surface of each piece is carved and scraped by machines exposing a hyper spectrum of color that was once hidden. Using chance and randomness to his advantage he intentionally adds a method that can potentially add errors. These elements of chance don’t hold his work back. In fact they add a playful element to the work that brings about unique elements that might not otherwise appear. The artist states

‘My work oscillates between contingency and control, visualized through material experiments resulting from new techniques that I develop to negotiate with the representation of abstraction.’

Discover more of Francisco Alarcon Ruiz’s work on his Instagram Account.

Rosa de Jong Creates Tiny Fantastical Worlds In Test Tubes

rosa-de-jong-micro-matter-miniature-architecture-in-tubes-designboom-0011rosa-de-jong-micro-matter-miniature-architecture-in-tubes-designboom-001 rosa-de-jong-micro-matter-miniature-architecture-in-tubes-designboom-005 rosa-de-jong-micro-matter-miniature-architecture-in-tubes-designboom-006

Amsterdam based designer, art director, and animator Rosa de Jong creates tiny worlds in test tubes. The series,  in which she has titled Micro Matter, almost acts like a physical miniaturized moment of nostalgia. Her work, in instants of logic and irrational, act like tiny encapsulations of deep rooted memories that are to uncover mysteries . Due to their scientific glassware, her pieces seem like they are something to investigate, to question, to figure out truth from. Their nonsensical yet somehow, almost recognizable nature, allows them to insist on a true moment of contemplation. Is this the depiction of something, somewhere, that belongs? Is this something that should be recalled, known? They are fantastical — they are a replica, but of something of a dream, of half remembered childhood homes, or fantasy houses, or fictionalized dwellings. Their beauty and their delicacy become even more inciting once it becomes known that they are hand made with simple products such as paper, cardboard and found materials from nature like tree branches and moss. Her work aims to tell a story, whether it be recognizable or not, she states;

“since people are naturally drawn to stories and people that are different, the goal is to tell the real story of the brand, an set it apart from the crowd, making every piece of communication authentic and personal.”

Artist Rosa de Jong uses her work to create a new narrative, to delve into the unknown through known resources; her work pushes us to feel and search, while holding our hand throughout the journey. (via design boom)

Léonard Condemine’s Eerie Masks In Arcane Settings Unravel The Structures Of Identity And Reality

Léonard Condemine - Sculpture and Photography Léonard Condemine - Sculpture and Photography Léonard Condemine - Sculpture and Photography Léonard Condemine - Sculpture and Photography

Léonard Condemine is a French mixed media artist who sculpts enigmatic masks and photographs them in haunting contexts. His work is influenced by occultism, mythology, and the tribal arts, representing the body in arcane relation with the earth; nude figures crouch by the fire, in the forest, and beneath starry skies. Decorated with paint, feathers, and mirror shards, the masks are stunning works of art that transform the subjects into mythic (or perhaps monstrous) beings. Impressively, none of his images have been digitally manipulated; the magic of his work arises from a brilliant synthesis of setting, costume, composition, and light, thereby transforming reality into the realm of dreams.

Condemine is interested in the dual forces of identity formation and identity loss. The masks, albeit on a human body, are extremely adept at obscuring the figures’ humanity; with their faces (and thus their emotions) inaccessible to the viewer, the figures become embodiments of mystical forces and the wilderness around them. This effect is so powerful, that when Condemine and his brothers posed for the final series of photos last November, not even their closest friends could identify them beneath their masks. This alienation from subjectivity is both unsettling and compelling, revealing identity as a construct, and also opening the images up to endless interpretation.

Learn more about Condemine and his work on his Tumblr and Instagram. More detailed images of the masks can be viewed on his blog.

Artist Ann Hoi’s Haunting Hologram Reminiscent 3D Paper Sculptures

23720225861_8a70ec035e_b 23720223581_0841bf0c9a_b23720227721_1d70177ebd_b

Chinese artist Ann Hoi creates beautifully bizarre paper figurative sculptures. Usually depicting images of children and fantastical animal creatures within an air of melancholia, her work simultaneously achieves an essence of preciousness and unsettlement. Since graduating from Ontario College of Art and Design University in 2010, Hoi has only crafted around a dozen pieces;  each work is made through a long meticulous process. Her sculptures are created with a method that begins with the extremely clever use of a 3D animation software that allows her to develop, edit, and manipulate her characters digitally. She then prints her designs onto paper and has to build her works essentially through a version of intense puzzle piecing. Their monochromatic and literal xerox copied aesthetic allows them to almost exist as a physical representation of a digital hologram. They create a real virtual reality. They seem to exist on a strange border of futuristic and nostalgic — their “digital” quality allows them to be referential of that of a technological manifestation and therefore science fiction, however, the graphics, again, the monochrome palette, as well as the sort of “glitch” like feel, makes them seem like they are that of an old technology, a reminiscent one. Hoi’s work is undoubtedly unique. Each piece has the true ability to draw the viewer into a world that they have yet to experience. However, despite how removed from reality these works are, they some how do not feel out of place. It almost feels voyeuristic, as if the viewer is the one that doesn’t belong. (via Hi-Frustose)

Ben Butler Creates “Unbounded” Installation From 10,000 Wood Sticks

benbutler_art-05benbutler_art-06 benbutler_art-07

Standing like a miniaturized skeleton city, American artist Ben Butler has installed an epic geometric sculpture that seems to distort any sense of space. The installation, titled Unbounded, is a site-specific piece for Rice Gallery in Houston, Texas. The work is made up of ten thousand small rods of poplar wood. Through the creation of complex grids, the artist and a team put together this epic structure, building section by section, almost like a block building meditation. The artist notes that Unbounded “alludes to the notion that its form has no defined boundary, that is it untamed and fills the space according to its own logic.” Butler’s work, which is not solely sculptural but also delves into printmaking and draughtsmanship, consistently refers and reflects on the notion of mass. Each work is intricate, meticulous, but perhaps, most importantly, explores a sort of metaphysical notion of space. Delicate, yet powerful in scale, his work tends to use elements of the earth. The combination of the power of size and the natural material — which acts as a connection to the earth — allows his work to truly carry an awe inspiring essence. Almost like an Agnes Martin notion of finding these quiet patterns within nature meets the raw power of element and structure like the work of Richard Serra. Profound, with a nod to a notion of fun and simplicity, Butler’s installation truly plays with perception. (via IGNANT)