Inspired By His Fathers Unexpected Death Mike Mellia Creates A Compelling Portrait Of New York City

5.another-day-in-paradise-mike-mellia 2.another-day-in-paradise-mike-mellia Autosave-File vom d-lab2/3 der AgfaPhoto GmbH 4.another-day-in-paradise-mike-mellia

New York based photographer Mike Mellia creates Another Day in Paradise, a series of images that capture the essence of New York City under the influence of Mellia’s father.

After the unexpected death of his dad, the photographer began creating cinematic scenes around New York that were reminiscent of his father’s life. Mellia is compelled to showcase his father’s contemplative presence and love for jazz . The many clues that reveal what his father was, and is to him even after death, are subtle but powerfully present.

Mellia’s sentimental piece works along the lines of alienation and tension, however. It not only provides a glimpse into his father’s life but it also showcases Mellia’s hardships to accept his passing.

Advertise here !!!

Introducing The 3D Printed Dress That Turns Transparent When You Use Social Media

naked-dress-3d-printed-data-1

Being on social media makes us vulnerable. Anyone can track down your present or your past; the information is there and it is available. Even by tweeting and facebooking about the most mundane of things, Google and whichever company buys information off Facebook are able to know what to sell to you. This feeling of you when you’ve had that dream about being naked in public, yeah, Facebook and Google’s privacy invasions sometimes feel the same way.

In hopes that they could provide a more visual picture of what it means to be part of this post-privacy world, Xuedi Che and Pedro Oliveira of NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program  create x.pose, a “wearable, data-driven sculpture” made out of flexible, 3D-printed mesh and layers of reactive displays which are controlled via Arduino, an open source electronics prototyping platform specially made for creative interactive objects.

The dress is divided into sections, each corresponding to whatever neighborhood the wearer is tweeting or posting to Facebook from. This means that when the wearer logs onto Facebook or sends a tweet via smartphone, the dress connects via Bluetooth and becomes less opaque in the “area” where he or she is currently active, revealing a part of the wearer’s body.

The more personal data is released via smartphone, the more transparent the dress becomes. (via The Daily Dot)

Advertise here !!!

Vilde Rolfsen’s Stunning, Etherial Landscapes With Plastic Bags Challenges Societies Perception Of Everyday Objects

Vilde Rolfsen Vilde Rolfsen Vilde Rolfsen

With an interest in merging consumer culture and fine art practices, Norwegian photographer Vilde Rolfsen takes the most ubiquitous piece of global consumerism, a plastic grocery bag, and creates a series of photographs that, with the assistance of modified lighting and colored cardboard, showcase a an ephemeral landscape, reminiscent of snowscapes or dancing oceans. The plastic bags used for this project were all sourced from the street; this is a very minor but important fact that underlines Rolfsen’s ultimate mission:

My findings have showed me that people take everyday objects for granted, for example a plastic bag or a Brillo pad. You use them for a couple of things, carry your groceries or scrub your dishes. By removing the objects from their original function, I am forcing the viewer to look at the object as an aesthetic thing rather than a useful thing. I challenge society’s perceptions of everyday objects, because these objects are of such normality they become surreal in a photograph.

(via Anothermag)

Liu Di’s Massive Photoshopped Animals Bring Attention To Beijing’s Urban Ruins

di_liu_beautiful_decay_01 di_liu_beautiful_decay_02 di_liu_beautiful_decay_03

On a crowded bus ride in Beijing, Chinese artist Liu Di noticed his surroundings. “Looking out at the decrepit housing blocks”, he said, “I had a vague but strong feeling that there was something missing between the ground and the sky.” It was then that he had the idea for his 2008 series, Animal Regulation, an almost cinematic display of enlarged animals sitting amongst the ‘urban ruins’ of the city of Beijing. Using photoshop, he seamlessly embedded these wild, large animals into Beijing’s forgotten and depleted back streets, construction sites and tenement courtyards.

With the addition of the gigantic,exotic animals, Di not only tries to fill the void that he notices as he travels through the city, but most importantly, he attempts to draw attention to these spaces in a big and scandalous way. We cannot  help but notice ‘the big panda in the room’, and that, I think, is the kind of reaction the artist is looking for. The metaphorical animal living amongst the city of Beijing alludes to deeper issues here–the void is filled with an unwanted visitor and in order for it to go away something must change.

Di’s political undertones cannot be missed.

“Between nature and human society, between the material world and the intellect, between obedience to and violation of the laws of nature. It is only when our preconceptions are jolted that we wake up and truly see.”

These photographs are part of Barbara Pollack’s My Generation, an exhibition that acts as the first in the U.S  to focus solely on the new post-Mao generation of dissident Chinese artists. The catalogue includes works by Sun Xun, Lu Yang, Ai Wei Wei’s former assistant, Zhao  Zhao and many more. The show is currently being co-presented in two venues simultaneously through a unique collaboration between Tampa Museum of Art and the Museum of Fine Arts in St.Petersburg, FL. My Generation will be on view until September 28th, 2014.

Nina Röder’s Portraits Explore The Memory Of Three Generations Of Women

Nina_Roder_beautiful_decay_04Nina_Roder_beautiful_decay_05 Nina_Roder_beautiful_decay_06

Photographer Nina Röder creates Mutter Schuhe (Mother’s Shoes), a series that through a variety of portraits visually explores the evolution of three generations of women: her (Nina Röder), her mother, and her mother’s mother. All three women are wearing Röder’s grandmothers clothes and they are sitting around in the old rooms of her (Röder’s) mother’s childhood home. All women maintain more or less  the same expression, one of nostalgia for the most past, as they reenact mundane activities throughout the home. Through her choices of clothes and props, the artist is looking to explore how different individuals, her family, recall the past and how it evolves as time wears on.

“The personal narrative of my mother and my grandmother effects my life in a very dominant way: Almost every artwork I’ve done so far is influenced by conscious or unconscious aspects of family stories. For example, my grandparents were expelled from Bohemia (now Czechia) after the Second World War so they lost everything they had. I guess that is the reason why my grandmother now is keeping all her old clothes or furniture from the last 40 years. Almost all my ‘models’ are wearing clothes from my grandmother.”

(via Feature Shoot)

Marco Ugolini Showcases The Power Of Package Design On The Consumer’s Decision To Buy Excessively

Marco_Ugolini_beautiful_decay_01 Marco_Ugolini_beautiful_decay_02 Marco_Ugolini_beautiful_decay_03

While on his residency at JACA in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, photographer Marco Ugolini, in collaboration with Pedro Motta, created the series ‘Per Color’. The striking photographs, taken at a local supermarket near JACA, capture the merchandise by category of color: yellow, red, blue, black and white. With success, Ugolini showcases the lack of diversity in colored packages, perhaps revealing that the corporations that distribute the many products shown here are specifically using the same colors palettes because of an underlying psychological reason- the consumer will buy in excess if the color is vibrant and attractive enough. By visually displaying the ubiquitous packing format and color choices, he also aims to reveal that the supermarket serves as a space of manipulation. “My attempt in this action”, Ugolini says, “is to subvert this structure of power.” (via Ignant)

Tattoo Artist Creates New Areolas And Nipples For Breast Cancer Survivors

Inspirational Tattoo artist Vinnie Myers boosts the confidence of breast cancer survivors by giving them back what they lost.

Working out of his Finksburg, MD studio, Myers gives women back the bodies they loved before surgery by tattooing special nipple designs on their lovely lady lumps. Myers, who started as a traditional tattoo artist while in the army, currently mixes a wide palette of paint to achieve a 3-D effect design of areolas. Too often, he says, women just get the basic, nothing too fancy but that does the job of bringing back color and livelihood to the area. The women he tattoos say that the process doesn’t hurt much since most sensation is lost during surgery.

Myers has now done about 4,000 nipple tattoos since he got started. (via ABC 7 and SuperStar Magazine)

Axel de Stampa’s Playful Animations Put Static Architecture Into Motion

Memory-Museum-by-Estudio-America-photo-Nicolas-Saieh-by-Axel-de-Stampa

Zollverein-School-by-Sanaa-photo-unknown-by-Axel-de-Stampa VitraHaus-by-Herzog-_-de-Meuron-photo-Iwan-Baan-gif-Axel-de-Stampa-530SQ Theatre-Agora-by-UNStudio-photo-Christian-Richters-gif-Axel-de-Stampa750

French GIF artist Axel de Stampa creates Architecture Animée, a series of GIFS that show various buildings in motion, precisely to show them off through different perspectives. In opposition to the real life experience- one where the viewer moves around the building- these GIFS let the spectator remain static as the buildings shift and change positions.

Architecture Animée (Animated Architecture),  turns architecture by SANAA, Herzog and de Meuron, Morphosis Architects, and more into amazing, moving structures. (via ArchDaily)