Mathu Andersen’s Unreal Androgynous Instagram Selfie Transformations

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Mathu Andersen, creative producer on RuPaul’s Drag Race, creative director on Drag U, and RuPaul’s personal hair and makeup artist, crafts intricate selfies for his personal instagram account.

With his talents on board, he make himself up to portray diverse whimsical androgynous personas that comment on gender aesthetics.

Andersen was recently recognized on Instagram’s very own account for his skeletal Halloween look, gaining the photo almost 500,00 and Andersen a ton of new followers.

“…I like being that special thing that people can stumble upon and perhaps even get excited enough to share with others and I like to be left to my own devices and whimsy.”

His portraits are inspirational pieces of art that influence new make-up techniques in runways and up-scale fashion photo-shoots.

Follow Mathu on instagram at (@mathu7).

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Kim Dong-Kyu Gives Girl With A Pearl Earring And Other Iconic Figures In Paintings Tech Upgrades

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‘girl with a pearl earring and an iPhone’ – based on ‘girl with a pearl earring’ by johannes vermeer, 1665

Dong-Kyu Kim

‘always in my hand’ based on ‘in the conservatory’ by édouard manet, 1878-9

Dong-Kyu Kim


‘a family gathering’ based on ‘the balcony’ by édouard manet, 1868

Dong-Kyu Kim

‘her mirror’ – based on ‘rokeby venus’ by diego velázquez, 1647–51

Korean illustrator Kim Dong-Kyu gives technological updates to Girl With A Pearl Earring and other iconic works in Art History.

Kyu’s images, although hysterical, are quite critical of the way smartphones/gadgets have dramatically changed today’s social interaction. Themes of alienation, avoidance, self-centerness, and attachment prevail through the series of images. It is interesting to think back on the cultural history of most of these works [mostly the 19th and 20th century works on here]; the juxtaposition of the cultural implications of the scenes of each painting and today’s conception of socialization is quite amusing and very different, yet, at some points, very similar.

For instance, Degas’ The Absinthe Drinker’ from 1876, reveals the increasing social isolation in Paris due to a stage of rapid growth and confinement brought forth by the highly urbanized and elite-driven atmosphere of the new Paris. The woman, actress Ellen Andrée, blankly stares into the walls of a Parisian café. With a glass of absinthe in front of her, she solemnly contemplates the nothingness of what is going on around her. The man, painter Marcellin Desboutin, sits next to her but glaces towards the opposite direction, looking to catch on to something interesting outside of his close quarters. Similarly, on Kyu’s rendition, the woman find herself ignored and in a state of alienation as she is the only one not using a gadget.

These definitely leave us wondering if social interaction has been one of those things that evolve to become more of the same thing. With or without technology, it seems clear to me that the urban, and the elite societies, both rendered in these paintings (with and without Kyu’s additions),  look to the outside, and inside, towards their phones, in order to fill some sort of void, and/or escape whatever lies in font of them. If this is true or not…that is up to you to decide.

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Hair As Typography

Monique Goossens

Monique Goossens

Monique Goossens’

Designer Monique Goossens transforms the hair left behind on the garbage, shower drain and/or combs into a work of typography.

Monique Goossens’ work includes elements of both design and organic art. The concept is disturbing yet brilliant, and design has never seen something quite like this before. Although her idea challenges established conceptions of function [and aesthetics], her work doesn’t stray away from the bizarre and amusing.

“The hair letters consist of hundreds of hairs, and give the impression of being fine pen drawings. The basic shape of the letters is created by forming the hairs into a legible character, during which process I follow the natural characteristics of the hairs: curly, rounded corners, springiness. To a great extent, it is the dynamic of the hairs which determines the shape of the letters. The ends of the hairs create an organized chaos, an energetic play of lines which forms a haze around the letter’s basic shape.”

The Amsterdam based artist studied Interior Design and Styling at Academie Artemis. Shortly after, she became interested in the relationship between photography and design, so she continued her studies at the Design Academy in Eindhoven.

Danny Evans Gives Celebrities A ‘Make-Under’

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New York artist Danny Evans, photoshops photos of celebrities to make them look like the average joe, precisely, to show what the super famous would eventually look like without the best make-up artists and stylists that money can buy.

“It was a reaction to the over-Photoshopped images of celebrities that we see everyday. I thought it would be interesting to take it in the opposite direction.”

The project has been active since 2006, when Danny started ‘making-under’ the highly popular photographs of socialite Paris Hilton. Evans was fascinated by how quickly Paris’ pictures created instant buzz, and how much power she really had over a mass public just by being rich and ‘attractive’. Needless to say, the collection of Paris’ ‘make-unders’ grew from there;  Evans created a Facebook page named Planet Hiltron which turned into a huge success; from there, he started to work with other celebrities.

“Basically just stripping away their cool personas I always find it interesting to see what’s left after the Hollywood has been scrubbed off. My intention wasn’t necessarily to age them, but to strip them of their ‘Hollywood’ facade. That has more or less been my general goal with this series all along.”

(Via I Acknowledge that Beauty Exists)

How Real Men Would Look If They Posed Like Models in Famous Underwear Ads

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Women have had the opportunity to rise against the perfection of the ad model. For instance, Jes from The Militant Baker goes against the grain by reinventing the black and white, over-perfected couple shots seen in Abercrombie and Fitch’s stores by posing, as a plus size model, with the regular Abercrombie male model. Many ad campaigns [Dove, Hanes, etc] have also done the same thing countless of times by producing content that celebrates the fact that beauty comes in every shape and size. These ads, however, almost never feature men, but only women.

So what happens with men? Do they not go through the same? Are they not as affected by the distorted ideals of beauty as much as women are?

In this photo series, Jenny Francis and The Daily tabloid newspaper, The Sun [England] teamed up to show how real men compare to the popular underwear ads that showcase the chiseled abs and faked tanned male models.

Four average looking men, stood alongside David Beckham, Cristiano Ronaldo, Freddie Ljungberg, and David Gandy to show off what a real life man would look like wearing the same exact underwear and standing in the same exact poses. The photos are quite funny, but they are also quite empowering as the provocative poses and the polarity of bodies shown in the comparisons further examine the different male body types out there, from short and thin, to tall and bulky. Just like women, many men are confronted with the issue of body ideals that are often impossible to achieve. (Via My Modern Met)

Stencil Of 9,000 Bodies On Normandy Beach Created To Mark International Peace Day

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The Fallen, an installation by two British artists [Jamie Warley and Andy Moss], entails striking silhouettes of fallen soldiers on Arromanches beach in Normandy. The project is a tribute to the civilians, German forces, and Allies who lost their lives during the Operation Neptune landing on June 6, 1944 on Normandy Beach.

The artists, together with a team of volunteers, traveled to the site in order to create the silhouettes, which were individually drawn into the sand with pre-prepared stencils.

After the completion of about 9,000 imprints, the shapes were then left to wash away by the beach waves; a poetic visual composition that reminds us that life is temporary.

“The idea is to create a visual representation of what is otherwise unimaginable, the thousands of human lives lost during the hours of the tide during the Second World War Normandy landings. People understand that so many lives were lost that day but it’s incredibly difficult to picture that number.”

Veterans and families, including some who have lost loved ones in recent conflicts were involved in the ‘Fallen’ project. (Via DailyMail Online)

Carl Warner Recreates Landscapes With Food

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English photographer Carl Warner creates realistic landscapes that are made out of food. As an experienced landscape photographer, Warner puts his talents to work in order to reinvent the conventional type. The ‘Foodscapes’ are created in Carl’s London studio where he crafts out each and every little detail (all components completely made out of food) through intricate and laborious steps. The scenes are photographed in layers from foreground to background. The food products used tend to wither quite quickly under the beaming lights, this might take each landscape even more time to get finished.

He first starts off with a set of drawings; he lines up the model-drawings that he would like to work with, and from those he picks the one that will be worked on.

Warner has a team of food stylists and other artists that help him with the process.

“ Although I’m very hands on with my work, I do use model makers and food stylists to help me create the sets. I tend to start with a drawing which I sketch out in order to get the composition worked out, this acts as a blue print for the team to work to.”

Mark Nixon’s Photographs Of Vintage Teddy Bears

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Bobo-age: 34.Height: 12″
Belongs to: Shane Maher

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Beary (6) Height 12”
Belongs to: Tom O’Connor Jr

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Daddy Bunny (7 ½) Height 14” -Belongs to: Zoe Bracken

Flopsie (6) Height 14" Belongs to: Lua Spencer

Flopsie (6) Height 14″
Belongs to: Lua Spencer

Photographer Mark Nixon creates portraits of worn-out vintage teddy bears in the series Much Loved Bears. These nostalgic portraits immortalize the innocence of youth; better yet, the goodness and appreciation of a child, as they hold on to the old with no remorse. The photographs are paired with text provided by the owner and they are part of a book called Much Loved.

The funny looking portraits project a sense of irony, as seeing the teddy bear, a signifier of early age, and their ‘wear’ and ‘tear’, a signifier of old age, together generate an interesting tension between the two. The battered teddy bears are a symbol of love, respect and friendship- moreover an undenying preservation of a friend that was important, and therefore hard to replace.

“When you see these teddy bears and bunnies with missing noses and undone stuffing, you can’t help but think back to childhood and its earliest companions who asked for nothing and gave a lot back.”

It feels as if these photographs also expound on a critical string of thoughts regarding the journey of becoming older, and what it means to be an owner of something today. The fact that we so easily get rid of ‘damaged’ material things with the eagerness of wanting more and ‘better’ is something that contrasts Nixon’s attention to the teddy bear’s ‘battlescars’; for a kid,however, the damaged but useful and loved, is not something to easily get rid of. (Via My Modern Met)