The Largest Group Of Works By Hieronymus Bosch To Be Exhibited Together In The Netherlands

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A fairy tale, the garden of Eden and Hell. Hieronymus Bosch was a painter (ca. 1450 to 1516) from the Medieval era representing fantasy landscapes with imaginary and bizarre characters. In one of his most famous painting, ‘The Garden of Earthly Delights’ he depicts in a triptych, a multitude of religious symbols blended with amusing dark isolated little scenes.

Hieronymus Bosch’s style is childlike and at the same time stern and serious. On the left side of the triptych, a religious scene. G.od is presenting Eve to Adam in the quiet and peaceful garden of Eden. What is looking like a traditional scene seems in fact to represent the beginning of life and its debauchery. The following part of the painting shows the consequences of a story we know too well nowadays. That is, the story of Adam eating the forbidden fruit and sent with Eve to another land. A land where nothing is in order. Birds and fruits are bigger than humans and seem to have dominated. The animals are feeding the humans. Which, from the look on their faces, are acting like zombies. We are looking at submissive and obedient individuals satisfying their primal needs, mating and eating. The last part of the triptych depicts macabre and violent scenes. The decline of corruption through the representation of hell. People are being tortured and murdered by the animals and other hybrid creatures. Knives, swords and arrows are completing the disastrous landscape.

The set of paintings is ultra-detailed and furthermore for an artist living in the Medieval era. This looks from afar like a tale for children. The naive colors and the rounded shapes makes the art piece easy to watch. That was probably the first intent. The second was to maybe address a message indirectly to the viewers. The story of Adam and Eve disobeying from their original paths and its inevitable deadly consequences is shown to the public. The context of the paintings are unsure but what is unquestionable is the talent, vision and beautiful imagination of Hieronymus Bosch.

The triptych, 20 paintings and 19 drawings, will be displayed at Noordbrabants Museum in the Netherlands as part of the ‘Hieronymus Bosch: Visions of a Genius’ exhibition from February 13th to May 8th 2016. (via Juxtapoz)

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Haegue Yang’s Mysterious Orb Sculptures Covered With Thousands Of Bells Chiming In Motion

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Hundreds of small metal balls covering the surface of the sculpture series created by Korean, Berlin based Artist Haegue Yang. ‘Sonic Figures’ are geometric abstract creatures that come to life when they’re shaken by a human hand.

Haegue Yang speaks her own language. She has come up with her own vocabulary through abstraction. She doesn’t need the viewers to understand the meaning and influence of her work. She is offering an experience. The Sonic sculptures were created while she was working on another project during her residency in Glasgow. While listening to music, she imagined developing a piece that will ring in unison when moved around.

The artist is used to working with random household items. From that starting point, she produces sculptural assemblage. By playing with the vibrations and the chimes of the bells, she explores what it is to be human. She defies human basic senses such as sight, sound, smell, and touch. A multi sensory and mobile environment where the viewers can appreciate through her art their body and intellect. Focusing on sensory experiences, Haegue Yang not only liberates charming sounds and subtle chills from basic elements, she also triggers the viewer’s will to interact and experiment.

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Jessica Dance Knows How To Satisfy Gluttony By Knitting Make-Believe Meals

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All the comfort foods we dream of eating but that we’d rather watch from a distance to avoid calories. Jessica Dance made it happen! The art director/model maker/prop stylist collaborated with photographer David Sykes for Stylist magazine to deliver perfectly arranged hand knitted fake meals.

A full platter of English breakfast, beans on toasts, a hot dog covered with mustard. And if we need more condiments we can find them next to our cutlery, salt, pepper, ketchup; Jessica thought of everything. Using lambswool and a knitting machine, she fashioned all the foods at home. She says the bacon was the hardest to achieve as she wanted all the fat to be as real as possible.

The colors are of course true to real food colors. But the tones are slightly altered, giving a healthy, non greasy aspect that we should have found looking at the dishes. If it wasn’t for the fact that this was commissioned for an adult magazine we could have thought we were looking at kids’ toys.
There’s something warm and gentle in the story. And it’s not just about the food elements. It’s a combination. The way it’s photographed, the set up and the overall look of the food that’s transforming random meals into a grown-up tea party set. (Via Booooooom)

Engineer Zachary Abel Creates Complex Geometrical Sculptures Out Of Office Supplies And Other Household Items

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His passion for mathematics has led Zachary Abel to create geometric, science inspired sculptures made out of random elements. Paper clips, binder clips, playing cards and toothpicks are assembled according to specific formulas.

From far, the round sculptures appear uncomplicated to achieve. In actuality, Zachary Abel uses small needle-nose pliers and a schematic layout. For the Impenetraball project, the ball is comprised of 132 binder clips. The round form is obtained by assembling the binder clips one by one following a flat pattern in order to get a hollow centre and a filled surface. The designs have been so popular the talented engineer had to make a guide on how to construct the binder clip ball on his blog.

Zachary Abel in his Mathematical sculptures series is willing to share his enthusiasm for maths; replacing paint and brushes with pliers and patience. ‘Geometry in particular fascinates me, and I delight in discovering hidden patterns even in the most mundane of objects.’

Glenn Brown’s Incredibly Flat Paintings Look As If They Are Covered In Thick And Gooey Paint

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brown_GB145_DeepThr.tifPaintings by Glenn Brown are literally a blend of art references and a contemporary vision. Gloomy in the choice of subjects and bizarre in the colors used, the pictures resemble mutant depictions of grotesque figures.

Glenn Brown has a unique technique. He borrows images from subjects that have already been painted by masters such as Salvador Dali, Frank Auerbach, Rembrandt and unknown artists of mass market science fiction paperbacks. Taking his subjects directly from books or the internet, he then digitally retouches the features of the characters. Using Photoshop, he enlarges, crops and makes the necessary changes on the details he feels will give another outlook from the original version.
Paint is then applied to the altered picture. The artist’s brush strokes are thin and swirling on the canvas, creating a flat surface with a ‘trompe l’oeil’ effect. Glenn Brown exaggerates the flesh tones which counteracts with the kitsch color scheme. The rendering is wild and singular.

The artist is fascinated with the transformation of a reproduced picture. He is channeling new emotions from a subject that has already created previous sensations. Although his method has been used in the past by renown painters such as Picasso with the Velasquez’s Las Meninas, he is the only one who is impacting the original pieces he is working with. The soul of the paintings is dark and willing to connect with another dream world which, according to Glenn Brown would be welcoming different layers of unconscious fantasies.

Glenn Brown’s work is currently displayed in the piano room at the Brown’s Hotel in London until October 2015. A display curated by Gagosian Gallery representing the artist.

Duck Bong Kang’s Sculptures Made Of PVC Pipes Look As If They Are In Constant Motion

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Characters running, cycling and jumping; stuck in one moment. The Korean artist Duck Bong Kang is freezing time with his stacked PVC pipes sculptures. It’s his way at looking at speed and condemning the need for human kind to strive for it.

‘My work begins by attempting to capture this absurd desire that we have for speed.’

Duck Bong Kang and his futuristic vision. A multitude of PVC pipes grouped together and spray painted with urethane paint. A cluster of plastic enhanced with gradient color tones. The uneven pile of pipes and the gradient add to the speed effect the artist is trying to capture. The lines are blurred and the details cannot be perceived. The rendering creates an optical illusion that attracts the viewer’s curiosity. Where is this character’s headed?

The artist’s purpose is to pause the motion and to connect with the viewer. He is questioning through his sculptures the necessity of speed. And if the race between each other doesn’t end up by making us feel insecure. ‘More’ seems to be the enemy according to Duck Bong Kang. Once we’re settled at our current pace, whichever that may be, we are always looking to speed up and that’s a dangerous quest. Both physically and emotionally.
While speeding, our soul is not enjoying the flow of our lives. It focuses on getting power and it degrades its moral values. The artist is asking for an inner introspection on whether living an accelerated life is a risk worth taking.

Zadok Ben David’s Metal Figurative Sculptures Look As If They Are Made Of Intricate Lace

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Sculptures looking like lace drawings floating in the air. Zadok Ben David, an Israeli artist based in London is using metal to create magic and illusion. A personal mean he chooses to connect culture and innovation.

From far, the sculptures seem indistinct, projecting only a large silhouette. Up close, we are able to discern the intricate details that form the shape. Zadok Ben David laser cuts the  metal to generate the irregular patterns covering the surface. The pieces should not be visualized from one angle. By circling around the pieces we uncover the hidden feature: the flatness of the sculptures. The artist is playing with volumes, going from 2 dimensional to a make belief 3 dimensional structure.

Zadok Ben David depicts human bodies in unusual postures. The individuals seem to be in the middle of an inner contemplation and the artist have caught them by surprise. He is rendering spontaneous moments and delivering them to us. The artist’s meaning behind the figurative sculptures is to question humankind’s place in the world. This notion of presence is channeled by the representation of the botanical inspired motifs, the airy silhouettes and the harmonious combination of it all.

Sarah Sitkin Invites Us Into Her World Of Flesh, Organs And Mutant Portraits

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Disturbing creatures and creations bursting out from the photographs of Sarah Sitkin. The Los Angeles based artist renders dark and intriguing images that entice and generate space for introspection. The subjects of the photographs represent the kind of ugliness that attracts. She leaves it to us to draw the limit of where hideous stops and beauty starts.

Sarah Sitkin edits digitally to a minimum. Limiting the use of photoshop, she hand makes most of her props. Costumes, artificial body parts, dramatic lighting and projections are invented by instinct to fulfill the artist’s desire to give birth to her vision. Within the gloomy set up, symbols which seem dear to the artist appear sporadically. Geometric patterns such as triangles and diamonds mimic genitalia shapes. Body parts; fingers, skin and facial features are twisted and rounded until they don’t make sense anymore.

Leaving reality to reach her fantasy world, Sarah Sitkin is inviting us to come along and share her journey. Inspired by Jodorowsky and Kubrick movies, she says she is captivated by images more than plots and dialogues. The photographs do not reflect agression or anxiety. They are the depiction of Sarah Sitkin’s unique field of vision; one where deformation and anamorphosis constitute the basis of an aesthetically beautiful inner world.