About Rose Holtermann

Rose Holtermann is a painter from New York City. To find her work, check out her website roseholtermann.com or follow her on Instagram @p.c.crankpots

Malaysian Artist Jun Ong Installs A Massive Glowing Star In A Five Story Building

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Malaysian artist Jun Ong has implanted a glowing star within an unfinished five story building in the town of Butterworth, Malaysia. The awkward confinement of the large luminescent sculpture within the otherwise gaping desolate space offers an air of confusion. Almost as if the star was there by mistake, perhaps stuck. The installation was indeed informed by a notion of error — the star seems to mimic a glitch. Metaphorically, this “glitch star” represents the state of Butterworth. The town, which was once an prosperous industrial port linking the mainland and island, now finds itself desolate and suffering from decentralization. The twelve sided star, spanning over the the full five floors of the building, is comprised of five hundred meters of steel cables and LED strips. The piece is created in fragments, as it is divided by the floors of the concrete structure. When entering the installation, the viewer is forced to experience each floor as its own unit, creating a multi-faceted adventure. Each floor is an experience of just a mere piece of the whole, perhaps alluding to the overarching disposition of the town itself. However, despite the installation’s “gltich” reminiscent quality and fractured formation, the star is wondrous and uplifting. The project, presented as a part of the Urban Xchange Festival, was curated by Eeyan Chauh and Gabija Grusaite of Hin Bus Depot Art Center. (via designboom)

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SEKDEK’s Fantastical Gore Ritual Acts As A Demon Extraction Kit

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Slightly gory yet somehow charming and fun, SEKDEK is part performative, part sculptural, part photographic, and part ritualistic. The artists behind the work refer to it as a “spirit extraction kit/ demon extraction kit.”

The project, in their own words,

“is a series of fantastically colorful, expressive & psychedelically gory sculptured head and torso images that were caught using an expressionistic painting/ messy visual chaos technique that includes throwing, spreading and or spitting clay, acrylic paint, glitter, fake blood, wigs, fabrics and flour etc.. all over ourselves.”

The inspiration for SEKDEK comes from a large spanning vat of various sources.  To name a few, the project takes visual cues from artist such as Mathew Barney, Björk, and H.R. Giger (the guy responsible for the creature from Alien [which he won an Oscar for] and apparently also the inspiration for “biomechanical” tattoos). They also name film influences such as the 1990 dark fantasy horror film Nightbreed, the 1988 satirical sci-fi movie They Live, and the opening scenes from Where The Wild Things Are. Also the heavy metal band Gwar (still not sure if this band is a joke or not) and images from National Geographic tribal indigenous documentaries.

Extensively absurdist yet clever and elaborate, SEKDEK is a unique project that invites imaginative thinking as it lives between the borders of fetish, gore, kitsch, and perhaps just plain ol’ innocent fun. 

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Van Orton Design Creates Retro Inspired Movie Posters Of Cult Film Classics

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Van Orton Design has recreated cult classic movie posters as vibrant digital works of art. The team is a creative collaboration of twin brothers from Turin, Italy. Using digital illustration tools, the brothers have created stained-glass reminiscent, 1970s retro themed images that are unbelievably elaborate and profoundly structured. Each poster is formulated by using the classic “one point perspective.” This is a a formula used by old masters that organizes an entire image based on a single vanishing point in the center. Every line is aimed to draw attention to the exact middle of the work — perfecting it’s perspective while simultaneously controlling the viewer’s eye. The posters portray a familiar scene from each film. The series ranges from new classics to older cult epics including The Shining, The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou, Pulp Fiction, 2001: A Space Odyssey, Young Frankenstein, Knight Rider, Deep Red, Indiana Jones and The Last Crusade, The Legend Of Zelda, Big Trouble in Little China, Brazil, and others of the likes. Their style is simultaneously unique and archetypically vintage. The use of loud color and clever hue pairing scream out for attention without being overbearing or overtly overwhelming. Van Orton Design‘s work hits the mark of what any good movie poster should achieve; they both embody and generate excitement for every single film. The duo have created something truly collectable and and absolutely fun. (via designboom)

Monica Piloni’s Dark Humor Sculptures Of Skeletal Fruit

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Brazilian artist Monica Piloni creates sculptures of skeletal fruit. Her work consist of dissected papayas, figs, oranges, and peaches that’s innards expose each fruit’s meat to be structurally held together by a spine and rib simulated structure. The tiny fish-like skeletal structures within each piece of fruit is created from vinyl and acrylic. Though the pieces are indeed manmade, the delicate nature of the work truly provokes the viewer to second guess his or her knowledge of reality. Illusion as everyday object seems to be a common theme within Piloni’s work. Her sculptures mimic ordinary items and manipulate them into sculptural puns. For example, other pieces of hers play with a sort of post-modern fragility of the body, a literal “plastification” of the human form. For instance, one of her sculptures is a muscular body as a dining room chair. Another piece consists of what looks like a mass genocide of naked barbies. It seems, perhaps, that Piloni’s work aims to, with an air of dark humor, remind us of the underlying reality of our comforts. Do these pieces of skeletal fruit remind us to be mindful of our consumption? Do we even really truly think about where what we consume comes from? What it’s made of? What death and harm simple everyday products causes to those who don’t have the luxury to partake on the demand side of capitalism? Simultaneously fun and disturbing, Monica Piloni’s work is provocative and inquisitive. (via designboom)

Unseen Art: A Revolutionary Project Allowing The Blind To Experience Classic Works Of Art For The First Time

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We live in a visual culture. Our daily ability to understand cultural references and have collective visual experiences shapes our discourse with our greater surrounding. Imagine never knowing what the mystery smile of the Mona Lisa looks like, or not being able to experience any work of art at all with out being told what it looks like. Imagine never being able to experience on your own how a piece of art makes you feel. For millions of blind people over the world, that is an everyday reality. Unseen Art, a project creating 3D models of master artworks, will change the art experience for the blind forever. With the help of resources from all over the world, the Unseen Art team is gathering information in order to create 3D documents of classic works, such as the Mona Lisa, to be printed in 3D form. Even better, the project is sharing these models for free, making sure that their information can be accessed anywhere in the world there is an 3D printer. Through the collaboration of 3D technicians, artists, and the visually impaired, the project has started to become a reality. With a little help, the project will be able to launch major gallery shows, create a 3D art community to constantly improve the project, and, ultimately, make art more accessible than ever.

“It would be a revolution to get blind people going to art galleries,” states Eija-Liisa, the cultural director of The Blind Federation of Finland.

Please check out more information on Unseen Art here. Please support the project by donating here.

LA Artist Adi Putra’s Euphoric Images Of Youthful Bliss Save Us From Cold Season Melancholia

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Los Angeles based artist Adi Putra takes you to an ethereal dreamland embedded in enigma, euphoria and that quintessential Southern California aura of bliss. It is no mystery why he frequently works with musicians such as Moby, L.A. Witch, Kimbra and The Vivian Girls — his style is fluid, loud, reverberating and ultimately undeniably cool. His work acts as the embodiment of warmth and mischievous freedom. It is images like these that save our souls from wilting during these bleak and bone chilling winter months. In moments of cold season melancholia, Putra reminds us, through an alluring controlled chaos, what true creativity and passion feels like. With titles such as Spring Fever, Valley of the Wind, and Dreamcatcher, his work pictorially creates that undeniable feeling of youthful excitement. That one you get sitting on a porch, drinking a beer as the sun starts to rise, filled with a quiet thrill for what’s to come.  Almost like a vintage, punk rock Ryan McGinley, Putra is able to create striking images that demand attention through glorifying the beauty in youth and purity of nature. His work, romanticized with quiet tones of sepia matched with hints of ultraviolet hues of hippie energetic galore, hits every note aesthetically thrived for. Each piece is truly blissful, sinister and perfectly raw.

Kouhei Nakama’s Mystical Short Film Features Vibrantly Mutating Human Flesh

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Art director Kouhei Nakama has created a computer generated short film that explores the possibilities of a 21st century human chameleon. Within her film titled Diffusion, she portrays a female figure as a generative canvas to investigate the potentiality of human flesh. Using a system that simulates biological processes through mathematical testing, she is able to imitate texturized skin based on patterns and textures that occur in nature. The film begins with what most closely resembles, perhaps, a white and red version of the shapeshifting capabilities of Mystique from X-Men, and transitions into a soft poetic display of a humanoid light show. Through vibrant alterations of rainbow colors and body motions displayed with toned muscles, the film provokes thoughts of almost futuristic yogi sentiments of human aura and energy field displays. The film comes to it’s climax with sculptures of human bodies that seem to be either virtual or somehow physically interconnected as hands appear to have the ability to travel through bodies. The constant shift of color and pattern and eventual bloating and deformation of the figures allow the piece to end on a dramatic, yet satisfying note. Simultaneously alien, human and robotic, Nakama’s display of futuristic metamorphosis is both disturbing and undoubtedly magical. Kouhei Nakama’s short film holds its own as a  mystifying and captivating piece of work; however, it’s true allure lies in it’s ability to display the vast ability (and even further potential) of what CGI programs can accomplish. (via The Creators Project)

Patricia Piccinini’s Disturbing Sculptures Of Plant-Animal-Human Hybrids

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Australia based artist Patricia Piccinini creates disturbing yet enticing human-animal-plant hybrids. Her work probes your brain in a very uncomfortable way, forcing you to come to terms with the potentiality of a sci-fi engineer’s fantasy come alive. Her work spans various media, however her silicone, fiberglass, and human hair sculptures seem to take the cake of most striking. These alien plants and what may resemble sea creatures made from human flesh are not exactly easy to digest — yet,  they are unquestionably inventive and just as hard to look away from as they are to look at. She begins her process by drawing through her thoughts. Once her idea becomes developed thoroughly, she plays with material. Her ideas manifest themselves through media spanning anywhere from photography to drawing to sculpture. She is able to develop a project anyway in which she believes will best connect the viewer and the concept. Her sculptures range in process — she uses both traditional approaches such as hand sculpting using plasticine models as well as digital techniques such as CNC and 3D-printing. Through provoking thoughts of genetic mutation and the potential of biotechnology, each piece questions the boundary of possibility and perhaps aims to be the foresight to the alarming possibilities of the future.

Patricia Piccinini has been active in the art scene for more than two decades. In 2014, she won the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Melbourne Art Foundation. (via Illusion)