The Sad Three-Eyed Boy Sculptures Of Seungchun Lim

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Korean artist Seungchun Lim creates life-size sculptures.  His work is steeped in narrative, each piece a character.  Seungchun’s sculptures are, in fact, part of a complex story.  The three eyed boy above is born with a hump in his back that turns out to be wings.  Eventually his wings are stolen from him.  Independent of their grand tale, Seungchun’s sculptures still exude an air lonliness and sadness.  His characters wordlessly communicate through their powerful but quiet imagery.

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The Polygonal Street Art Of Sy

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Sy street art 9Street artist Sy creates cleanly crafted murals.  Rather than a hurriedly executed work, Sy’s pieces appear to be carefully planned to the extent of nearly seeming more at home in Adobe Illustrator than on an alley wall.  Sy clearly references and draws inspiration from 8-bit graphics and the block y polygons of early computer animation.  However, the simplistic graphics style really betray an expert use of light and perspective.  Subtle color shifts and familiar imagery in a surprising context add depth to the murals of Sy.

 

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The Sky Illustrations Of Thomas Lamadieu

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While many of us as tourists may walk looking up at the tops of buildings, artist Thomas Lamadieu is looking at the sky.  Lamadieu uses negative space to create playful drawings and illustrations.  Utilizing photographs of a sky squeezed between rooftops, he illustrates within the patches of blue.  The pieces of sky cut out by the buildings are a point of inspiration for Lamadieu culling stories from the shapes he’s dealt.  Rather than being a limit, they become a point of departure.

Classical Photographs of Contemporary “Beauty” (NSFW)

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In a classical compositional style, Photographer Phillip Toledano‘s series A New Kind of Beauty depicts subjects that have drastically augmented their bodies.  The photographs contrast classical ideas of beauty with the contemporary and nearly obsessive pursuit of it.  A fixation with beauty is ancient, but the images examine it in the light of modern body modification.  Toledano says of the series:

“I’m interested in what we define as beauty, when we choose to create it ourselves.  Beauty has always been a currency, and now that we finally have the technological means to mint our own, what choices do we make?”

Landfill Harmonic And ‘The Recycled Orchestra’

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Landfill Harmonic- The world sends us garbage… We send back music. from Landfill Harmonic on Vimeo.

Recycling is a way of life in Cateura, Paraguay.  Many people there earn money by scouring the huge landfill for items that can be recycled.  A certain garbage picker, though, began recycling for much more than money: for the young people in his community.  Nicolás Gómez began creating instruments – violins, cellos, drums, guitars – from the trash he sifted through and gave them to local children.  The idea picked up steam and children’s orchestra known as “The Recycled Orchestra” came to life.  Landfill Harmonic, a documentary on Gómez and the orchestra, is slated to capture the inspirational story.  [via]

The Indoor Deserts Of Álvaro Sánchez-Montañés

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The images of photographer Álvaro Sánchez-Montañés‘ series Indoor Desert seem like elaborate installations.  However, he actually found them this way.  These buildings were once part of a town named Kolmanskop in southern Namibia.  It had been situated near a gold mine.  When the mine ran dry it was abandoned as was the town.  The strong winds quickly overtook the town filling its buildings with the sand of the nearby Namib desert.  The homes now filled with desert instead of families only emphasizes each photographs loneliness and underscores the immense power of nature.

Unbelievably Realistic ‘Painted’ Fish By Keng Lye

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It may surprise you to know that these are not real animals – they’re probably most accurately called paintings.  Artist Keng Lye brings these aquatic creatures to life by creating layers of resin and alternating them with acrylic paint.  Coupled with his expert play of perspective, the fish (and other creatures) seem ultra realistic.  Keng Lye has since added three dimensional portions to his ‘paintings’ as can be seen in these first four images, making them seem even more unbelievably alive and real.   [via]

The Slicing Sun Light Sculptures Of James Nizam

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Artist James Nizam calls photographs documents of ‘light sculptures’.  For the series he captures the sun and manipulates it into various ‘structures’.  Using precise cuts into the exterior of the house, small mirrors mounted on ball joints, and studying the movement of the summer sun Nazam was able to capture these images.  A synthetic fog emphasizes the concentrated beams of light, making them almost palpable like floating fluorescent light bulbs.  See photos of Nizam preparing the house after the jump.