Lisa Rienermann’s City Sky Typography

aufbau1.indd Lisa Rienermann typography2

Lisa Rienermann typography3

Lisa Rienermann‘s Type the Sky series is reminiscent of the big city tourist’s point of view.  The tops of metropolitan buildings squeeze in the sky to form a unique alphabet.  Rienermann uses the negative space, the small patches of cloudy sky, between roofs to as the structure of a fun typography.  The font has been understandably popular.  The series received an award from the Type Directors Club New York.  It was also used by Mercedes and Renault for respective advertising campaigns.

Advertise here !!!

Ai Wei Wei’s Politically Powerful New Installations For The 2013 Venice Biennale

Ai Wei Wei installation1 Ai Wei Wei installation4

Iconic Chinese artist Ai Wei Wei has never shied away from political ideas in his art.  His contributions to this year’s Venice Biennale are no exception.  Bang utilizes 886 stools to create this sprawling installation.  Such three legged stools were traditionally handcrafted and a common item in many Chinese households.   They had numerous uses and were often passed down through generations.  With the onset of the Cultural Revolution and modernization such stools soon disappeared.  The enormous structure seems to have grown uncontrollably but organically – much like the explosion of growth in population urban centers, and consumer products.

Straight addresses the tragic 2008 Sichuan Earthquake and specifically the thousands of children’s lives claimed by the disaster.  Ai Wei Wei straightened 150 tons of mangled steel rebar and neatly stacked in the project space.  While bringing to mind the suspicion of shoddy school construction the installation also serves as a vehicle to mourn, remember, and address.  Straight reflects Ai Wei Wei’s desire to straighten out the complexities and problems surrounding the massive casualties.  [via]

Advertise here !!!

Patterns Of Sound Visualized In Sand

Brusspup video1

YouTube user brusspup blends science, illusion, and art into double-take inducing videos. Sand is used to create amazing patterns that are called Chladni figures.  Brusspup pours sand on a metal plate that is connected to a speaker and tone generator.  Various frequencies create different patterns of sand on the plate, higher frequencies creating more complex figures.  Different portions of the plate do not vibrate with each frequency.  The sand naturally accumulates in these areas of no frequency, creating a visualization of the sound traveling the metal plate.   [via]

Powerfully Political Art Made From Food

three sculpture6 three sculpture3

three sculpture1

The artwork created by the Japanese art collective known as Three creates work with a political subtext as powerful as it is subtle.  Three often uses common food objects such as fish shaped soy sauce packets or candy.  For example, the installation Eat Me uses 7,000 wrapped candy pieces hung from the gallery ceiling in the shape of a house.  Visitors are encouraged to pluck candy from the installation and toss the wrapper in a corner set aside in the gallery.  Slowly throughout the day the ‘house’ of candy is transformed into a pile of trash – a symbolic recreation of the overwhelming destruction of homes by Japan’s 2011 earthquake and tsunami.

The Obsessively Detailed Linocut Portraits Of Mircea Popescu

Mircea Popescu illustration2 Mircea Popescu illustration8

Mircea Popescu illustration1

Romanian artist Mircea Popescu‘s series Head Stock unravels the typical portrait.  These obsessively detailed pieces are linocut prints – the image etched, inked, and impressed on paper.  Portraits often become stand-in’s for the sitter they identify.  Instead, Popescu’s faces float independent of bodies and clear facial features.  The images  seem to be piled with countless layers hinting at a physical face and pointing to something deeper behind it.  The complexities of the Popescu’s faces reflect the intricacy of identities behind portraits.

A Digital Clock Made Up Of 288 Analog Clocks

Humans Since 1982 sculpture4

Humans Since 1982 sculpture6

A million times (Time Dubai) by Humans since 1982 from Humans since 1982 on Vimeo.

A Million Times by the Stockholm based studio Humans Since 1982 beautifully mixes the analog and the digital.  The piece begins with the simple analog clock as its starting point.  288 clocks are arranged on the wall, their hands spinning to run through hypnotic patterns and display the time digitally.   Each of the 288 clocks’ two hands  run independently, powered by 576 individual motors.  The entire installation is connected to custom made software and operated from an iPad.  Watch the dials spin in the video after the jump.

Christopher Boffoli’s Giant Food World And Its Tiny Residents

Christopher Boffoli photography3 Christopher Boffoli photography1

Christopher Boffoli photography2

Photographer Christopher Boffoli continues his popular his Big Appetites series.  The series of photographs captures tiny people living in a giant culinary world.  These inhabitants explore, work, and even get into trouble with their huge food surroundings.  Despite its whimsical appearance, the series has a more serious grounding.  Big Appetites reflects America’s complex relationship with food.  The consumption of food – not only by eating it, but by reading and watching television about it – is ubiquitous, as if we lived in a giant world of food.

Mini Tokyo Comes Alive With 3D Mapping Projection

Tokyo City Symphony3 Tokyo City Symphony1

This miniature city is a carefully modeled Tokyo at 1:1,000 scale.  The Roppongi Hills skyscraper, dominant in the Tokyo skyline, celebrates its 10th anniversary by creating this model titled Tokyo City Symphony.  In addition to being intricately detailed, the model Tokyo is accompanied by a 3D mapping projection set to a corresponding soundtrack.  The projection brings the metropolis to life adding an impressive level of reality to the tiny Tokyo.  Check out the video to see Tokyo City Symphony in action.